Category Archives: Counties

Creating Maps & GIS Projects

.. follow these steps to create custom maps & GIS projects .. while maps are “everywhere,” there is a continuing need to make new maps. Reasons for this include changing underlying geography, new features (like stores or customers to be viewed), visually examining geographic relationships not available elsewhere (e.g., census tracts and ZIP codes), different geographic depictions for an area (smoothed versus precise vertices) and other reasons. A map can provide view(s) that relate to geospatial analysis; map visualization can be indispensable (showing road features adjacent to selected properties).

View of Initial Map Objective — University Park, TX; Dallas Metro area
Census tracts (black boundary) shown with census tract code as label.

— view developed using CV XE GIS software

Follow steps in this section to make a map like above for any area in the U.S. This section provides an overview of how to use the CVGIS software to quickly build a map. It is actually more than a map, it is the process of building a GIS project. A map is one rendering that can be displayed, and optionally published, using a GIS project. Map/GIS project development steps reviewed here can be performed using the no fee CVGIS software and no fee data resources, CVGIS Levels 1 and higher can save the GIS project and have additional geography available. With geographic extension, the process illustrated here can work for any place in the world. A GIS project is a file itself that contains references to map files (shapefiles) located on your computer. Once a GIS project has been created and saved, it can be immediately opened with CVGIS using the File>Open operation. After turning your computer off, and restarting it, the GIS project can be re-opened to display the same view as saved in an earlier session.

No Previous GIS/Mapping Experience Required
This section is designed for use by anyone including those with no previous GIS/mapping experience. Requirements are a Windows computer and Internet access. This section is a part of a module used in the Certificate in Data Analytics and the CVGIS Certification Programs. Developers can also benefit from this and related tutorials to learn more about how GIS can be integrated with other data analytics tools and methods.

Making Maps Steps
The objective of this session is to develop a map (and GIS project) to view characteristics of census tract “48113019301”. The first step in making a map (GIS project) is to have a clear objective. This 11 character geocode uniquely identifies this Census 2010 census tract among all other 73,057 tracts in the U.S. See more about census tract geography and geocodes. While this application shows a process for adding only two layers, it could be extended by adding more. Similarly, while this application uses a census tract boundary files (shapefile), alternatives are census blocks, block groups, ZIP code areas, among others.

These steps should take an inexperienced user 10-15 minutes to develop a new CVGIS project view. If anything becomes confused, close the program and start over.
Step 1. Install CVGIS (1/1/2017 or later version)
Step 2. Open Base Project
Step 3. Get Census Tract Shapefile
Step 4. Get Roads Shapefile
Step 5. Modify Map View
Step 6. Optionally Save GIS Project

The view should now be similar to the view at the top of this section.

Next Steps
Try the process yourself with geography of interest to you. View/use other “Creating Maps & GIS Projects” tutorials to learn about:
• integrating subject matter
• developing and using thematic maps
• creating site profiles

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

2016 Presidential Election – Voting & Citizen Voting Age Population by County

In 2015, the U.S. citizen voting age population (CVAP) was 227,019,486 of the total U.S. resident population of 321,418,821 (70.6%). 2016 CVAP data are not yet available. In the 2016 presidential election, 128,298,470 votes were cast — approximately 56% of the citizen voting age population. For individual counties the 2016 presidential election vote ranged from 16% of the CVAP to near 100%. Use the interactive table in this section to examine characteristics of the 2016 presidential election vote and citizen voting age population by county.

This section reviews access to tools to view/analyze characteristics of the U.S. voting population (ages 18 and older and citizen) and participation in the 2016 presidential election. Data are based on Census Bureau annual population estimates, American Community Survey 2010-14 5 year (ACS 2014) Citizen Voting Age Population (CVAP) special tabulation and 2016 presidential election results.

Visual Analysis of 2016 Presidential Election Vote by County
The following graphic shows the 2016 presidential vote as a percent of the citizen voting age population.

– Click graphic for larger view.
– View developed with CV XE GIS software.

U.S. Electorate Profile: Characteristics of the Citizen, 18 and Older Population

– based on 2015 American Community Survey 1-Year estimates
*Except where noted, “race” refers to people reporting only one race.
**Hispanic refers to the ethnicity category and may be of any race.
***Households with citizen householders.

U.S. by County Interactive Table Analysis 
Use the interactive table to examine characteristics of the 2016 presidential election vote and citizen voting age population by county. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used to examine patterns in the Houston, TX metro by county. The Find in CBSA button is used below the table to select only counties in this CBSA/metro. The rightmost column header cell is clicked to rank counties on the voter participation rate for the 2016 presidential election.

– click graphic for larger view.

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine a set of counties in a metro or state of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Regional Economic Information System: Annual Updates

.. which counties are experiencing the fastest economic growth? by what economic component? what does this look like on a per capita level?

.. access & analyze economic characteristics and patterns by county and state .. annual time series 1969 through 2015 with projections.  Personal income is the income available to persons for consumption expenditures, taxes, interest payments, transfer payments to governments and the rest of the world, or for saving. Use the interactive table to examine characteristics of counties and regions of interest. The table provides access to 31 personal income related summary measures. These data are a selection of a broader set of annual time series data from the Regional Economic Information System (REIS). REIS is a part of the ProximityOne State & Regional Income & Product Accounts (SRIPA) and Situation & Outlook (S&O) featuring current (2016) estimates and demographic-economic projections. Go to table.

Visual Analysis of Per Capita Personal Income Patterns
The following map shows the Houston metro (view profile) with bold brown boundary. Counties are labeled with county name and 2014 per capita personal income.

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-2014 by County
.. relative to U.S 2008-2014 change

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Interactive Analysis – County or State Profiles
The following graphic illustrate use of the interactive table to view an economic profile for Harris County, TX. Use the table to examine characteristics of any county or state. Click graphic for larger view.

Interactive Analysis
– comparing per capita personal income across counties
The next graphics illustrates use of the interactive table to rank/compare per capita personal income across counties. Rank/compare states. Choose any of the economic profile items. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Monthly Local Area Employment Situation; 2015-2016

.. this update on the monthly and over-the-year (August 2015-August 2016) change in the local area employment situation shows general improvement. Yet many areas continue to face challenges due to both oil prices, the energy situation and other factors.  This section provides access to interactive data and GIS/mapping tools that enable viewing and analysis of the monthly labor market characteristics and trends by county and metro for the U.S. See the related Web section for more detail. The civilian labor force, employment, unemployment and unemployment rate are estimated monthly with only a two month lag between the reference date and the data access date (e.g., August 2016 data are available in October 2016).

Unemployment Rate by County – August 2016
The following graphic shows the unemployment rate for each county.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated LAES GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing legend details.

As shown in the illustrative interactive table view below, seven of the ten MSAs having the highest August 2016 unemployment rate were in California. Use the table to examine characteristics of counties and metros in regions of interest. As apparent from the monthly patterns shown in the table, some areas are impacted by season factors, but others are not.

View Labor Market Characteristics section in the Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook Reports, providing the same scope of data as in the table below integrated with other data. See example for the Dallas, TX MSA.

The LAES data and this section are updated monthly. The LAES data, and their their extension, are part of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook database and information system. ProximityOne extends the LAES data in several ways including monthly update projections of the employment situation one year ahead.

Interactive Analysis
The following graphic shows an illustrative view of the interactive LAES table. Seven of the ten MSAs having the highest August 2016 unemployment rate were in California (ranked on far right column in descending order). Use the table to examine characteristics of counties and metros in regions of interest. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

New 2016 Digital Roads Database

.. new resources for updated geographic reference and statistical mapping and geography for routing logistics and optimization .. The Census Bureau TIGER/Line is a continuously updated geographic database used for geographic reference and geospatial processing of data from various Census statistical programs including the decennial census Census 2010 and American Community Survey (ACS 2014). The public use version of TIGER is released annually that includes updates developed during the year. ProximityOne integrates the TIGER geographic updates in the Digital Map Database. Warren Glimpse, founder of ProximityOne, developed the GBF/DIME used as the prototype for TIGER/Line development.  See related Web section for more details, interactive table and access to GIS resources.

The TIGER database includes many types of files and data. The data are developed in the form of shapefiles and dbase files that may be used directly with the ProximityOne CV XE GIS software at no fee. Perform wide-ranging mapping and geospatial analysis applications using these GIS resources. See more aboutmapping statistical data.

TIGER/Line Roads Data
This section is focused mainly on the use of the TIGER/Line “edges” shapefile. The edges shapefile U.S. wall-to-wall street/road coverage in the form of line shapefiles. Lines classified as roads are intersection-to-intersection road segments. Line segment fields include name, left- and right-side high and low addresses, and many related attributes.

Use the U.S. by county interactive table below to examine attributes of TIGER 2016 street/road coverage. ProximityOne developed these county summary data by processing each county edges shapefile. See about using the edges shapefile with the CV XE GIS software below in this section.

Illustrative Applications
The following sequence of graphics shows an example of a “road segment” in context of related geography. These applications focus on an area in Kansas City, MO (Jackson County),. Jackson County has 52,139 TIGER 2016 road segments. See the related step-by-step summary of how you can create these and similar map views using CV XE GIS below in this section.

Road Segment Map View & Profile
– Starbucks locations shown as red markers; pointer on road segment by a Starbucks location.
– View illustrates how non-Census, non-statistical data can be integrated with TIGER.
– Clicking on the road segment (in GIS operation), a mini-profile displays.
– The profile shows attributes of the selected road segment.
.. the TLID value shows the unique ID for this segment among all segments in U.S.
.. left- and right-side high and low address ranges and included in the profile.

Corresponding Census Block Profile
– The road segments are boundaries for census blocks.
– The census block boundaries are shown using a related TIGER blocks shapefile.
– The more that 11 million census blocks cover the U.S. wall-to-wall.
– The census block code (290950073002017) is shown as a label in the map graphic and in the profile.

Neighborhood & Shopping Area View
– A zoom-out shows the location, roads and blocks for a broader areas.

Regional View
– A further zoom-out shows the focus area view in context of the metro counties (a related TIGER shapefile)
– The January 2016 Kansas City city area (orange cross-hatch pattern) is shown using a related TIGER 2016 shapefile.

TIGER 2016 Roads
TIGER/Line 2016 vintage files were released in August 2016. While many aspects of road coverage remain as described in this section, TIGER/line 2016 includes many updates as well as “new vintage” geography for school districts, state legislative districts, congressional districts and other political/statistical area geography.
• More about TIGER 2016.
• More about TIGER/Line in general.

TIGER 2016 Road/Street Name/Address Coverage
— Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to examine the number and characteristics of road segments by county. This view shows the top 10 counties based on the number of total road segments.

– click graphic for larger view

Using TIGER/Line with CV XE GIS
These operations require a Windows computer with Internet connection
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the TIGER Roads project fileset
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now)
… unzip TIGER Roads GIS project files to local folder c:\tiger2016
3. Open the c:\tiger2016\riger2016_kc.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named c:\tiger2016\tiger2016_kc.gis
4. Done. The start-up view is shown at top of this section.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Navigating the U.S. Federal Statistical System

.. an overview of the Federal statistical system and how to access data  .. the U.S. Federal Statistical System offers a vast array of diverse data resources that are useful in wide-ranging planning and analytical applications. Many of these data resources, such as census block level demographics from the decennial census, are unique in scope and content; in many cases there are no alternative data resources.

But there are issues/challenges for the data user to navigate the Federal Statistical System. Examples … the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases total employment data by county quarterly and monthly through multiple programs. The data values differ, for methodological reasons, but the net result can be confusion. The Census Bureau releases total employment data from many statistical programs by county both annually and more frequently. Where are these alternative total employment data and how can they be accessed? How do these various measures differ and which data are right for my situation? This section provides basic statistical program information. Subsequent updates will provide more detail.

This section provides an overview of the U.S. Federal Statistical System (FSS) and information that can help stakeholders navigate access to selected types of data produced by the FSS. While the FSS is focused on agencies that collect, develop and make available statistical data, there is a broader set of data and resources that relate to accessing and using these data. As technology and related data analytics resources have evolved, access to and use of these data is closely associated with the development of geographic data by Federal statistical and other agencies and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

The FSS is a decentralized set of agencies that collect, develop and make available statistical and geographic data. The OMB Office of Statistical Programs and Standards (SPS) provides a FSS coordinative role. The SPS establishes statistical policies and standards, identifies priorities for improving programs, evaluates statistical agency budgets, reviews and approves Federal agency information collections involving statistical methods, and coordinates U.S. participation in international statistical activities.

While the FSS spans more than 100 agencies, the 13 “principal statistical agencies” have statistical work as their principal mission. Excluding funding for the decennial census ($919.3 million requested for the Decennial Census for FY 2016), approximately 38 percent ($2,486.9 million of the $6,486.6 million total proposed for FY 2016 President’s budget request) of overall funding for Federal statistical activities (of the Executive Branch) provides resources for these 13 agencies. The principal statistical agencies include:
Census Bureau (Commerce)
Bureau of Economic Analysis (Commerce)
Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice)
Bureau of Labor Statistics (Labor)
Bureau of Transportation Statistics (Transportation)
Economic Research Service (Agriculture)
Energy Information Administration (Energy)
National Agricultural Statistics Service (Agriculture)
National Center for Education Statistics (Education)
National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/HHS)
National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics NSF/Independent
Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics — SSA/Independent
Statistics of Income (IRS)

The remaining 62 percent of the FY 2016 budget involves more than 100 programs that conduct statistical activities in conjunction with another program mission. These statistical programs are components within a Federal department or other agency. They include a broad set of centers, institutes, and organizations in addition to the 13 principal statistical agencies.

There are also Federal agencies whose statistical activities are not part of the Executive Branch. These agencies include the Congressional Budget Office, which develops and applies projection models for the budgetary impact of current and proposed Federal programs; the Federal Reserve Board, which compiles the widely used Flow of Funds report and other statistical series and periodically conducts the Survey of Consumer Finances; and the U.S. Government Accountability Office, which uses statistical data in evaluations of government programs.

Guide to Navigating the Federal Statistical System
The following graphic is a snapshot of the Guide to Navigating the Federal Statistical System. See http://proximityone.com/fss.htm to access the entire guide.

– click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn

Analyzing ACS 2014 1-Year Supplemental Data

.. examining 2014 characteristics of areas with population 20,000 and over  .. this section summarizes how to use the America Community Survey (ACS2014) “supplemental” data (ACS2014S) to access more current estimates than otherwise available. The America Community Survey “supplemental” data are just that, a supplemental set of ACS 2014 1-year estimates — for areas 20,000 population and over. See the related Web section providing more detail.

The importance of the ACS 2014S data are two fold.
1 – 2014 1-year estimates for a larger number of areas than available from the ACS 2014 1-year (ACS2014) estimates.
2 – more current (2014) data for those areas only available from the 5-year estimates (centric to 2012) that are between 20,000 and 65,000 population.

The ten cities/places with the highest 2014 median family income based on 1-year estimates were all under 65,000 population. These cities were not included in the ACS 2014 1-year standard estimates but were included in the ACS 2014 1-year supplemental estimates. See list below.

This section provides an overview of the ACS 2014 supplemental data and provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze characteristics of these areas. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual county demographic-economic projections. See schedule of related 2016 updates.

Scope of Expanded Geography Available
As shown in the table below, 2014 1-year “supplemental” estimates are available for more than twice as many counties from the ACS2014S compared to the ACS2014 “standard” 1-year estimates. However, there area a more limited set of subject matter data available from the ACS2014S data compared to both the ACS 2014 1-year and 5-year estimates.

MSA/MISA: Metropolitan Statistical Areas/Micropolitan Statistical Areas Counties: county and county equivalent

ACS 2014S Data Availability by County
The following graphic shows the additional counties for which ACS 2014 1-year estimates are available using the “supplemental” data.
• ACS 2014 1-year “standard” estimate counties — blue fill pattern
• ACS 2014 1-year “supplemental” estimate counties — orange fill pattern
• Only ACS 2014 5-year estimates available for remaining counties
Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view. The larger view shows metropolitan area (MSA) boundaries. Note that for example, ACS 2014 1 year data are available for all counties in the Austin and San Antonio metros (see pointer) — previously unavailable..

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. any CV XE GIS user can create this view using the default US1.GIS project

ACS2014S Tables — scroll section
The ACS 2014 supplemental data include 42 tables and a total of 229 data items. Br> The table number and descriptions are summarized below.

View full table/item detail in tables shells: ACS 2014S Table shells (xls)

ACS 2014 Selected Supplemental Items for Selected Geography
  — interactive table
The interactive table contains all geography for which the ACS2014S data have been tabulated for these geographies: U.S., state, county, city/place, 114th Congressional District, MSA/MISA, PUMA, urban area and school district. The table provides access to key selected items.

The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table. First cities/places were selected using the Type drop-down below the table. Next, the table is ranked in descending order on median family income. As shown in the graphic the largest 10 cities/places were under 65,000 population. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.