Monthly Archives: January 2018

Examining America’s Cities: Demographic-Economic Updates

.. of the approximate 29,500 U.S. cities and places — geographic areas of population concentration — 301 had an ACS 2016 5-year estimated population of 100,000 or more. The median household income among these places, one measure of economic prosperity, ranged from $26,249 (Detroit, MI) to $117,642 (Frisco, TX).

What are the demographic-economic characteristics of your cities/places of interest? How do these compare to peer groups or a metro/state of interest. Learn more using the new city/place demographic interactive tables. Its about more than economic prosperity — using these data provide otherwise unknowable attributes about the demographic, social, economic and housing characteristics of individual cities/places.

Visual Analysis of City/Place Population Dynamics
The following view shows patterns of population percent change by city in the Charlotte, NC/SC metro area.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… more about above view in City/Place Economic Characteristics section.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity ($MHI) by City/Place
— Northern Virginia, DC, Maryland; part of the Washington, DC metro.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click graphic for larger view with places labeled by name and $MHI.

Interactive Tables — new January 2018
Use these interactive tables to get answers, build insights:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics
• Economic Characteristics — used to develop data at top of section
• Housing Characteristics
Related:
• City/Place GeoDemographics Main Section
• Annual City/Place Population Estimates & Trends
• Similar ACS tables: Census Tracts | ZIP Codes | State, Metro & County

More About City/Place GeoStatistical Data and Data Analytics
The term “places” as used here refers to incorporated places and Census Designated Places (CDPs). Incorporated places are political areas having certain governmental powers designated by the corresponding state. Unincorporated places, or Census Designated Places (CDPs), are statistical areas having no official standing and no governmental powers but are recognized as being areas of population concentration. Wide-ranging demographic-economic estimates are developed annually for the approximate 29,500 incorporated cities and CDPs based on the American Community Survey 5-year estimates. See more about the ACS 2016 5-year estimates.

Many cities have planning and data development operations that develop important local data including tax parcel data, building permit data, transportation and infrastructure data … bit generally not the data reviewed in this section. Many cities have no planning department to develop, organize and analyze geographic, demographic, economic data … making these data even more essential.

Increasingly in core sections of metropolitan areas, as shown in the above graphics, a large number of cities/places are contiguous. Many retain their own character evolving over many years. Having the detailed ACS demographic-economic data makes it possible to compare places side by side. Use the same data for related drill down geography such as census tracts and block groups to examine neighborhoods and market areas.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metro 2016 Demographic-Economic Data Analytics: Social Characteristics

.. part one of four parts focused Metro 2016 Demographic-Economic Data Analytics.  This post is on Social Characteristics; ahead: general demographics, economic characteristics and housing characteristics. See related Web section.

Patterns of Educational Attainment by Metro
The following graphic shows patterns of educational attainment (percent college graduate) by Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Legend shows color patterns associated with percent college graduate values.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– use these resources to develop similar views for any area.
– modify subjects, zoom, colors, labels, add your data.

A Selected Social Characteristic & How Metros Vary
In 2016, the U.S. percent college graduates was 31.3 percent (of the population ages 25 and over) while Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) ranged from 11.3% (Lake Havasu City-Kingman, AZ MSA) to 60.6% (Boulder, CO MSA). See item/column S067 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze metros based on this measure for 2016 … in context of related social characteristics. These data uniquely provide insights into many of the most important social characteristics.

Social Characteristics – Subject Matter Covered
– Households by Type
– Relationship
– Marital Status
– Fertility
– Grandparents
– School Enrollment
– Educational Attainment
– Veteran Status
– Disability Status
– Mobility; Residence 1 Year Ago
– Place of Birth
– Citizenship Status
– Year of Entry
– Region of Birth
– Language Spoken at Home
– Ancestry
– Computers & Internet Use

Metro Data Analytics
Use tools, resources and methods to access, integrate and analyze social characteristics for metropolitan areas or Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs). The table includes data for 382 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and 129 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs). These data will update in September 2018.

Approximately 600 subject matter items from the American Community Survey ACS 2016 database (released September 2017) are included in these four pages/tables:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics — reviewed here
• Economic Characteristics
• Housing Characteristics
See related Metro Areas Population & Components of Change time series data.

Focusing on Specific Metros & Integrated Multi-sourced Data
While these data provide a good cross section of data on social characteristics, this access structure is a) for one time period and b) data sourced from one statistical program. Also, there is a lot going on in metros; these are typically large areas with many important and diverse smaller geographies such as cities, counties and neighborhoods among other others.

Use the Metropolitan Situation & Outlook (S&O) reports to develop extended insights. See this example of the Washington, DC MSA S&O Report. Examine trends and projections to 2030. Inegrate your own data.

Using the Interactive Table
The following example illustrates use of the metro social characteristics interactive table … try using it on areas of interest. This view, showing metros partly or entirely in Arizona, was first developed by using the state selection tool below the table Next the selected columns button the table is used to examine educational attainment columns/items. The final step was to click the header cell on the “S067” item to sort metros on percent college graduates. It is easy to determine that the Flagstaff metro has the highest percent college graduates (home to Northern Arizona University).

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Federal Statistical System Updates January 2018

.. sharing updates on developments about and within the Federal Statistical System (http://proximityone.com/fss.htm). Today I attended a briefing by Nancy Potok, U.S. Chief Statistician (part of OMB OIRA) at the American Statistical Association offices. The session was coordinated by the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics (COPAFS).

Several topics were discussed, including:

1. Will the Federal government shutdown on January 19, 2018, due to a budget impasse? As of now, there seems to be a 50-50 consensus likelihood.

2. In the spring of 2018, there might be a far-reaching Federal government reorganization plan released by OMB. While there are no details on this, it may well be that certain Federal statistical agencies will be reorganized. This follows more than a year of processing recommendations suggested by individual agencies. Right now, it is not clear if this will be focused on Federal statistical and information-related operations or something broader.

3. It is expected that the 2018 Federal budget, thus including the 13 primary Federal statistical agencies, will be released in early February. Much of the 2019 Federal budget is also completed, though many important details remain.

4. The widely publicized possible addition of a citizenship question to 2020 census questionnaire was discussed. OMB approves the addition or deletion of all questions on Federal government information collection forms. See USATODAY editorial comments today, consistent with my opinion. The merit to the argument to add the citizenship question, if there is one, is that while block group level tabulations of citizenship status from the American Community Survey are available and updated annually, these are subject to sampling error and other errors of estimation, they are not tabulated at the census block level, they are estimates for respondents over a five year period, and they will lag the 2020 census data (first release March 31, 2021) with ACS 2018 estimates (centric to mid-2016) released in December 2020. Key facts are that 1) at there is no Federal government agency requirement for citizenship by block data, 2) a citizenship question definitely imperil the quality of the Census 2020 results, 3) block group level data are sufficient for any reasonable need, 4) the cost of adding the question would be huge in an already underfunded census.

Next Federal Statistical System Updates
The next planned Federal Statistical System update will be in March followed by an update in April. We might move to a recurring monthly update.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

2018 U.S. & World Population

.. Welcome to 2018 .. how the U.S. and world are changing …

The Census Bureau estimates the U.S. population is 326,971,407 as of January 1, 2018. This represents an increase of 2,314,238, or 0.71 percent, from New Year’s Day 2017. Since Census Day (April 1) 2010, the population has grown by 18,225,587, or 5.90 percent.

In January 2018, the U.S. is expected to experience one birth every 8 seconds and one death every 10 seconds. Meanwhile, net international migration is expected to add one person to the U.S. population every 29 seconds. The combination of births, deaths and net international migration will increase the U.S. population by one person every 18 seconds.

The world population on January 1, 2018 is estimated to be 7,444,443,881. The world has experienced a population increase of 78,521,283, or 1.07 percent, from New Year’s Day 2017. During January 2018, 4.3 births and 1.8 deaths are expected worldwide every second.

Patterns of Population Change by State, 2010-2017
The following graphic shows patterns of percent population change from 2010 to 2017. Use the associated GIS project to examine different years or subject matter items. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

How the U.S. Population is Changing
The following graphic shows how the population of the U.S. has changed from 2010 to 2017 and how the population might change 2018 through 2020. Click graphic for large view. The population is as of July 1 for each year. The components of change (birth, deaths and migration) are for the period July 1 through June 30 for that year.

Population for each year is computed by the population identity equation:
  P[t]=P[t-1] + B[t,t-1] -D[t,t-1] + M[t,t-1]
Viewing the larger image, see how each of the components of change are impacting the total population and population change.
… see more detail about these data for the U.S. and by state at http://proximityone.com/states2017.htm.

More About Population Trends, Patterns and Characteristics
See more about how population dynamics; use the interactive tables in these sections:
  • School Districts — http://proximityone.com/sdtrends.htm
  • Cities — http://proximityone.com/places2016.htm
  • Counties — http://proximityone.com/countytrends2016.htm
  • Metros — http://proximityone.com/metrotrends2016.htm
  • States — http://proximityone.com/states2017.htm

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.