Category Archives: Urban

Urban Area Demographic Trends 2010-15

.. tools and analytics to examine all urban areas with particular focus on Urbanized Areas and demographic change between 2010 and 2015 .. examining urban areas in context of metropolitan areas .. the four fastest growing Urbanized Areas (UAs) from 2010 to 2015 were in Texas. McKinney, TX UA led the nation with an increase of 27.5% in total population. View, rank, compare 2010 and 2015 demographic characteristics for UAs using the interactive table in this related section. Urban areas (Urbanized Areas and Urban Clusters) are important for many reasons. More than metros and cities, urban area geography better reflects how the urban and rural population is changing. Both metros and cities can change geographic boundary over the years. Urban areas are based on Census 2010 and unchanging between 2010 and 2020. Annual demographic updates are available from the American Community Survey (ACS 2015).

This section is focused on tools and analytics to examine all urban areas with particular focus on Urbanized Areas and demographic change between 2010 and 2015. Use the interactive table >in the related section to view, rank, query urban areas and demographic change for larger urban areas. Use the related GIS tools and data to develop related thematic and relationship maps. Perform geospatial analysis of geographic and demographic-economic characteristics using the resources we have developed. Gain insights into patterns that might affect you. Use these resources to collaborate on how, where, what, when and why of change.

McKinney TX Urbanized Area in Context of City
The McKinney, TX UA (bold orange pattern) is shown in context of McKinney city (cross-hatched area) and other urban areas (lighter orange pattern). It is easy to see that some parts of the city are rural and that the UA extends beyond the city in many areas. See more about the McKinney UA and in comparison to other urban areas using the interactive table.


– view created using CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Most Urbanized Areas (UAs, 435 of 487) have population 65,000 population or more resulting in the availability of annual demographic-economic estimates. Data are fresher than available for smaller urban areas (ACS 5-year estimates for areas under 65,000). This means more current data to assess more recent characteristics. As annual data are available UAs enabling analysis of change over time. The “2010s” marks the first time these refreshed, time series-like data have been available for urban areas. Businesses and those examining change performing market analysis benefit from the ability to examine characteristics or urban areas in combination with counties and metros.

Houston Urbanized Area in Context of Houston Metro
The Houston metro has a bold brown boundary. It is easy to see how the Houston UA (darker orange fill pattern) geographically relates to the metro. Other urban areas (all) are shown with a lighter orange fill pattern. It is easy to see the urban/pattern character of the general region. While the Houston UA is the largest, there are four UAs that intersect with Houston metro. Use the interactive table below to view their names and characteristics.


– view created using CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Urbanized Areas tend to be associated with metropolitan areas having a similar name. But very often there are multiple UAs within a metro; sometimes one is not dominant. Often there are several UAs in a metro having similar size. Use the interactive table below to view the relationship of UAs and metros (CBSAs).

Using Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query urban areas based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

The graphic shows the urbanized areas ranked in descending order based on 2010-2015 population. The rightmost column shows the area percent change in population over the period.

Fastest Growing Urbanized Areas, 2010-15

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine urban area patterns and characteristics based on your selected criteria.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Analyzing ACS 2014 1-Year Supplemental Data

.. examining 2014 characteristics of areas with population 20,000 and over  .. this section summarizes how to use the America Community Survey (ACS2014) “supplemental” data (ACS2014S) to access more current estimates than otherwise available. The America Community Survey “supplemental” data are just that, a supplemental set of ACS 2014 1-year estimates — for areas 20,000 population and over. See the related Web section providing more detail.

The importance of the ACS 2014S data are two fold.
1 – 2014 1-year estimates for a larger number of areas than available from the ACS 2014 1-year (ACS2014) estimates.
2 – more current (2014) data for those areas only available from the 5-year estimates (centric to 2012) that are between 20,000 and 65,000 population.

The ten cities/places with the highest 2014 median family income based on 1-year estimates were all under 65,000 population. These cities were not included in the ACS 2014 1-year standard estimates but were included in the ACS 2014 1-year supplemental estimates. See list below.

This section provides an overview of the ACS 2014 supplemental data and provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze characteristics of these areas. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual county demographic-economic projections. See schedule of related 2016 updates.

Scope of Expanded Geography Available
As shown in the table below, 2014 1-year “supplemental” estimates are available for more than twice as many counties from the ACS2014S compared to the ACS2014 “standard” 1-year estimates. However, there area a more limited set of subject matter data available from the ACS2014S data compared to both the ACS 2014 1-year and 5-year estimates.

MSA/MISA: Metropolitan Statistical Areas/Micropolitan Statistical Areas Counties: county and county equivalent

ACS 2014S Data Availability by County
The following graphic shows the additional counties for which ACS 2014 1-year estimates are available using the “supplemental” data.
• ACS 2014 1-year “standard” estimate counties — blue fill pattern
• ACS 2014 1-year “supplemental” estimate counties — orange fill pattern
• Only ACS 2014 5-year estimates available for remaining counties
Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view. The larger view shows metropolitan area (MSA) boundaries. Note that for example, ACS 2014 1 year data are available for all counties in the Austin and San Antonio metros (see pointer) — previously unavailable..

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. any CV XE GIS user can create this view using the default US1.GIS project

ACS2014S Tables — scroll section
The ACS 2014 supplemental data include 42 tables and a total of 229 data items. Br> The table number and descriptions are summarized below.

View full table/item detail in tables shells: ACS 2014S Table shells (xls)

ACS 2014 Selected Supplemental Items for Selected Geography
  — interactive table
The interactive table contains all geography for which the ACS2014S data have been tabulated for these geographies: U.S., state, county, city/place, 114th Congressional District, MSA/MISA, PUMA, urban area and school district. The table provides access to key selected items.

The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table. First cities/places were selected using the Type drop-down below the table. Next, the table is ranked in descending order on median family income. As shown in the graphic the largest 10 cities/places were under 65,000 population. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

America’s Million+ Population Cities

.. there are 10 million+ population cities in the U.S. .. each is reviewed in some detail in this section .. the change in U.S. city population from 2010 to 2015 ranged from growth of 357,979 in New York City to a decline of in Detroit, MI. New York City is actually five counties; the next largest city growth was Houston, TX with a 181,463 population gain. See cities with largest growth or decline using the interactive table.

The July 1, 2015 Census Bureau model-based estimates for the U.S. 19,505 incorporated cities show a total population of 202,066,769 compared to 192,179,239 as of Census 2010. These areas are incorporated cities as recognized by their corresponding state governments and granted certain governmental rights and responsibilities. ProximityOne integrates these estimates, with related data, in models to develop projections, examine change and assess the impact of change.

Largest 10 Cities — the Million-Plus Population Cities
The largest 10 cities in 2015, shown by this graphic taken from the interactive table below, are also the set of cities having 1 million or more population.

Locations and Attributes of the Largest 10 Cities
Locations of the largest 10 cities based on 2015 population are shown in the following graphic as red marker.

Examine demographic-economic attributes of these cities using these related individual city-focused sections.  These sections compare the city boundary/location with corresponding urbanized areas and include extended data from ACS 2012 and ACS 2014 1 year estimates presented in a comparative analysis format.
1. New York, NY
2. Los Angeles, CA
3. Chicago, IL
4. Houston, TX
5. Philadelphia, PA
6. Phoenix, AX
7. San Antonio, TX
8. San Diego, CA
9. Dallas, TX
10. San Jose, CA

City/Place Demographics in Context
State & Regional Demographic-Economic Characteristics & Patterns
.. individual state sections with analytical tools & data access to block level
Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook
.. continuously updated characteristics, patterns & trends for each/all metros

Visual Analysis of City/Place Population Dynamics
Use the CV XE GIS software with city/place GIS project to examine characteristics of city/place population, 2010-2015. The following view shows patterns of population percent change, 2010-15, by city in the Charlotte, NC/SC metro area.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click map for larger view and details including city name.

Individual million+ population city sections will be updated and the topic of separate future blog posts. Follow this blog to learn about updates to these and related sections.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metros 2016: Honolulu, HI Situation & Outlook

… examining Honolulu, Hawaii metropolitan area:
• How will the market for single family homes change in the next 5 years?
• How does economic prosperity in this metro compare to others?
• What are the patterns in metro rental income and rental vacancy rates?
• How do patterns vary within the metro by county/neighborhood?
• How are demographic-economic characteristics trending?

We examine these types of topics in this section. Stakeholders can replicate applications reviewed here for this and other metros. Select any metro.

.. this section now continuously updated … see Honolulu Metro Situation & Outlook; see related Hawaii Demographic-Economic Characteristics.

Metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

Focus on Honolulu, Hawaii MSA
This section is focused on the Honolulu, Hawaii MSA (formally designated by OMB as “Urban Honolulu, HI”); Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) 46520. It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather illustrate how relevant decision-making information resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights. The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro. – See a more detailed version of this document focused on this metro.

The Honolulu MSA is shown in the graphic below. The single county metropolitan statistical area is shown with bold boundary; counties appear with black boundaries and county name/geographic code labels.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

This metro is home to Fortune 1000 companies including Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc. and Hawaiian Holdings, Inc.

Principal cities (about principal cities)
… click the link to view city profile   Urban Honolulu.

The total population of the Urban Honolulu, HI metro changed from 956,336 in 2010 to 991,788 in 2014, a change of 35,452 (3.71%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 54 in 2010 and 54 in 2014, based on total population. Annual net migration was 3,980 (2011), 3,901 (2012), 4,316 (2013), -634 (2014). View annual population estimates and components of change table. See more about population characteristics below.

This metro is projected to have a total population in 2020 of 1,061,105. The projected population change from 2010 to 2020 is 104,769 (11.0%). The population ages 65 years and over is projected to change from 142,858 (2010) to 201,180 (2020), a change of 58,322 (40.8%). See more about population projections.

Based on per capita personal income (PCPI), this metro was ranked number 62 in 2008 and 74 in 2014. among the 917 metros for which personal income was estimated.The PCPI changed from $44,693 in 2008 to $49,722 in 2014, a change of $5,029 (11.3%). Per capita personal income (PCPI) is a comprehensive measure of individual economic well-being. Use the interactive table to compare PCPI in this metro to other metros. See more about PCPI in Economic Characteristics section below.

282 metropolitan statistical areas, of the total 381, experienced an increase in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) between 2009 and 2014. This metro ranked number 51 among the 381 metros based on 2014 GDP. The GDP (millions of current dollars) changed from $49,506 in 2009 to $59,271 in 2014 a change of $9,765 (19.72%). Real GDP (millions of real, inflation adjusted, dollars) changed from $49,506 in 2009 to $54,089 in 2014, a change of $4,583 (9.26%). GDP is the most comprehensive measure of metro economic activity. GDP is the sum of the GDP originating in all industries in the metro. See more about GDP in Economic Characteristics section below.

Attributes of drill-down, small area geography within the metro … metros account for 65,744 of the national scope 73,056 census tracts (others are in non-metro areas). This metro is comprised of 244 tracts covering the metro wall-to-wall. View, rank, compare demographic-economic attributes of these tracts using the interactive tables. Use the CBSA code 46520; see table usage details below the table.

The following thematic pattern shows a measure of economic prosperity (median household income: MHI) by census tract.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.
Develop variations of this map view using the Mapping Hawaii Neighborhood Patterns GIS resources.

See Zoom-in view>.

View additional selected details about the metro …
–  Component City Characteristics
–  Attributes of New Authorized Construction updated monthly
–  Component County Characteristics
–  Economic Profile
–  Component School District Characteristics

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about this metro, comparing this metro to peer group metros and use of data analytics to develop further detail related to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Importance of Census Tracts in Data Analytics

census tracts are important for many reasons. It is easy to misidentify or misunderstand patterns and characteristics within cities, counties and metros which become obfuscated using these higher level, more aggregate, geographies. Many cities and counties that might be experiencing demographic-economic decline will often have bright spots that are groups of a few or many census tracts.

Patterns of Percent Population with Bachelor’s Degree
— by Census Tract; Los Angeles Metro
The following graphic shows percent population age 25 years and over with bachelor’s degree by census tract based on ACS 2014 5 year estimates for a portion of the Los Angeles metro. Accommodating different demographic-economic thresholds/patterns, different legend color/data intervals are used. The pattern layer is set to 80% transparency enabling a view of earth features. Click graphic for larger view, more detail and legend color/data intervals. This map illustrates the geographic level of detail available using census tract demographics and the relative ease to gain insights using geospatial data analytics tools.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Get a Custom Map for Your Area of Interest
Use this form to request a no fee map graphic similar to the one shown above for a county of interest. Enter the request with county name and state in the text section; e.g., “Requesting social characteristics tract map for Cook County, IL.”

This section reviews reasons for the importance of census tracts in data analyyics. See related Web sections on tools, resources and methods that you can use to access, integrate and analyze U.S. by census tract general demographics data. The U.S. national scope Census Tracts Demographic-Economic Dataset contains approximately 600 subject matter items tabulated for each census tract organized into four subject matter groups:
General Demographics
Social Characteristics
Economic Characteristics
Housing Characteristics

Importance of Census Tracts for Data Analytics
Census tracts are important for many reasons.  A partial list of reasons is provided below.
• Covering the U.S. wall-to-wall, census tracts are the preferred “small area” geography for superior data analytics.
• The Census Bureau now produces annual tract demographic-economic data from the American Community Survey;  there is an evolving time-series at the tract level creating new analytical opportunities.
• Originally developed to equivalence neighborhoods, many still do.
• Defined by the Census Bureau in collaboration with local groups, tracts typically reflect boundaries meaningful for local area analysis.
• Defined generally for use with each new decennial census, most tract boundaries are stable and non-changing for ten years and many much longer.
• Designed to average 4,000 population, there are more than twice as many census tracts (73,056) than ZIP code areas (33,129).
• Tract boundaries are well-defined; unlike ZIP code areas which are subject to multi-sourced geographic definitions.
• Many data developers (e.g., epidemiologists) use census tract geography to tabulate their own small area data enabling more effective use of those data with Census Bureau census tract data.
• As a statistical geographic area (in contrast to politically defined areas, census tracts are coterminous with counties; data at the census tract level can be aggregated to the county level.
• Small area estimates for tracts are typically more reliable than for block groups.
.. census tracts are comprised on one or more coterminous block groups.
.. on average, a census tract is comprised of three block groups.
• Census tracts are used by many Federal, state and local governments for compliance and program management.

The annually updated American Community Survey provides “richer” demographic-economic characteristics for national scope census tracts. While Census 2010 provides data similar to those items in the General Demographics section, only ACS sourced data provide details on topics such as income and poverty, labor force and employment, housing value and costs, educational participation and attainment, language spoken at home, among many related items. The approximate 600 items accessible via the tract dataset are supplemented by a wide range of additional subject matter. ACS census tract data are updated annually in December of each year.

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about using census tract geography and demographic-economic data.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Mapping Statistical Data

.. GIS tools & data resources that you can use for statistical mapping & visual data analysis … Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide flexible and powerful capabilities to combine maps with data. In our increasingly data rich environment, we often experience “drowning in data.” GIS tools can help harness disparate and voluminous data and assist with data linkage. This section provides links to other sections that provide information on no cost GIS software and “production” GIS projects and datasets that you can use.

Patterns of Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-14 by County
— relative to U.S. PCPI 2008-14 change
To illustrate, the following graphic shows patterns of per capita personal income change 2008 to 2014 by county relative to the U.S. See more information. Click graphic for larger view with legend and additional details. Make variations of this map view using resources described in this section. Optionally integrate your own data.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated REIS GIS Project

GIS provides us with a way to improve collaboration; we can more easily comprehend and understand geographic relationships and patterns among “variables” and statistical data. As we reduce tabular data to visual representations, we are better able to communicate “what the data are telling us” among stakeholders and teams/committees. This second dimension, learning what the data are telling us, provides the power of creating insights for more effective decision-making.

Mapping Statistical Data Topics
Most applications presented in this section involve use of Windows-based desktop GIS software. The software and GIS project files and datasets are installed on your computer. These resources are available for use by members of the User Group at no fee.  Click a link below to view additional details about a topic of interest.  There you find a description of the scope and use of the data/geography, steps to access and use the GIS projects/datasets and getting started tutorials.
World by Country
U.S. by State
U.S. by Congressional District
U.S. by Metropolitan Area
U.S. by County
U.S. by City/Place
U.S. by ZIP Code Area
State by Census Tract (each/all states)
State by Block Group
State by Census Block
K-12 Schools & School District Data Analytics

Applications make use of a range of statistical data from the Federal Statistical System, and other sources, integrated with shapefiles from the Census Bureau TIGER/Line shapefiles, OpenStreetMaps, and other sources.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss accessing, integrating and using these resources … and linking these data/geography with other data that relate to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Comparing Census Tract Demographics Over Time

.. it’s about more than census tracts .. this section is about comparing American Community Survey ACS 5-year estimates: 2005-2009 with 2010-2014 … something new and powerful happening this week.

To make good business decisions we need hard data, recent data, trend data … to assess patterns and change and develop reliable, superior plans. Read about the past and then how things have changed for the better.

Imagine that it is 2005. Data from Census 2000 are now 5 years old. There will not be another update for richer demographics for all counties and cities in the foreseeable further. There will not be any update for small area geography such as census tracts or block groups until Census 2010. Businesses are forced to use out-of-date data to assess markets … where and how are opportunities changing? City and neighborhood planners can only make educated guesses to respond to growing needs of various population groups. Federal and state government programs that base funding allocations on demographics are challenged. Changes in the rental vacancy rates for most cities, counties and metros will remain unknown for the foreseeable future.

Fast forward to 2015 and present day reality. The situation is now radically different. First, we can now compare 5-year estimates from the 2009 American Community Survey ACS to those from the 2014 ACS 5 year estimates. Second, we will be able to do that again in 2016 — compare 5-year estimates from ACS 2010 to those from ACS 2015. Health planners can now assess the size and change in special needs population and how that matches up to resources that respond to those needs — rather than guessing. Schools and school districts can better understand how school age population trending and plan for enrollment change. Education agencies are better able to assess how changing demographics among school systems compare to one-another. Businesses can now determine the size of potential markets and how they are trending based on hard data. It is possible to compare changing patterns in rental vacancy rates and rental housing market conditions for all levels of geography down to block group.

The American Community Survey ACS provides a wide range of important statistics about people and housing for every community in the nation. These data are the only source of local estimates for most of the approximately 40 topics it covers for even the smallest communities. It produces statistics for ancestry, language, education, commuting, employment, mortgage status and rent, as well as income, poverty and health insurance. The ACS estimates are tabulated annually as 1-year estimates (e.g., the ACS 2014 1-year estimates) and 5-year estimates (e.g., the ACS 2014 5-year estimates. See a comparison below in this section about scope, advantages/disadvantages, and other usage attributes for the 1-year versus 5-year estimates.

See ACS 2014 5-year main page for additional data access & use details.

Data from the 5-year estimates are available for all geographies down to the block group level regardless of population size. Starting with the ACS 2014 5-year estimates, for the first time, users will be able to compare two non-overlapping five-year periods 2005-09 and 2010-14. Looking ahead, data from the 2006-10 and 2011-15 (available December 2016) will be comparable … and so on. Over several years, a time-series of 5-year estimates, non-overlapping five-year periods, will evolve.

Comparing Geography Between 2005-09 & 2010-14 ACS 5-Year Data
The following graphic summarizes geographic tabulation areas for 2005-09 and 2010-14 ACS 5-year data. Use the corresponding Web table as a reference guide for comparing data over time. Links provided in the table enable you to navigate to selected data access tables. This Web-page table updates with new links; bookmark the page for re-visits.

Updates
Posts later this month will provide updates on this topics; new data and new data analytics tools. Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss use of these data using analytical tools and methods applied to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.