Category Archives: Population

State Population & Components of Change: 2010-2016

.. data and tools to examine how state demographics are changing 2010-2016 … using the new 2016 population and components of changes estimates. The U.S. population changed from 308,758,105 (2010) to 323,127,513 (2016), a change of 14,369,408 (4.7%). Only three states lost population. See the growth rates for DC and the remaining states in this table. Highest growth rates were in D.C., North Dakota, Texas, Utah and Colorado.

Patterns of Population Change, 2010-2016, by State
The following graphic shows the percent population change by state with labels showing the rank among all states based on the percent change in population, 2010-16.

View created with CVGIS and related GIS project. Click graphic for larger view.

Resources to Analyze these Data
Use our tools to view and analyze annual population estimates, 2010 to 2016, rankings and components of change for the U.S., regions and states. Use the interactive table below in this section to view, rank, compare these data. Use the GIS tools and ready-to use project described below in this section to create maps for states and regions of interest. Create thematic maps for any of the fields/measures shown in the interactive table. Change color patterns and labels. Integrate your own data.

Using Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query states based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

The graphic shows the largest 10 states ranked in descending order based on 2016 population. The column “PopChg Rank 10b16” (second from right) shows the rank of this state, among all states, based on the population change from 2010 to 2016. The rightmost column shows the state’s rank for the period based on percent change in population over the period.

Largest 10 States based on 2016 Population

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine state patterns and characteristics based on your selected criteria.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

2016 Presidential Election – Voting & Citizen Voting Age Population by County

In 2015, the U.S. citizen voting age population (CVAP) was 227,019,486 of the total U.S. resident population of 321,418,821 (70.6%). 2016 CVAP data are not yet available. In the 2016 presidential election, 128,298,470 votes were cast — approximately 56% of the citizen voting age population. For individual counties the 2016 presidential election vote ranged from 16% of the CVAP to near 100%. Use the interactive table in this section to examine characteristics of the 2016 presidential election vote and citizen voting age population by county.

This section reviews access to tools to view/analyze characteristics of the U.S. voting population (ages 18 and older and citizen) and participation in the 2016 presidential election. Data are based on Census Bureau annual population estimates, American Community Survey 2010-14 5 year (ACS 2014) Citizen Voting Age Population (CVAP) special tabulation and 2016 presidential election results.

Visual Analysis of 2016 Presidential Election Vote by County
The following graphic shows the 2016 presidential vote as a percent of the citizen voting age population.

– Click graphic for larger view.
– View developed with CV XE GIS software.

U.S. Electorate Profile: Characteristics of the Citizen, 18 and Older Population

– based on 2015 American Community Survey 1-Year estimates
*Except where noted, “race” refers to people reporting only one race.
**Hispanic refers to the ethnicity category and may be of any race.
***Households with citizen householders.

U.S. by County Interactive Table Analysis 
Use the interactive table to examine characteristics of the 2016 presidential election vote and citizen voting age population by county. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used to examine patterns in the Houston, TX metro by county. The Find in CBSA button is used below the table to select only counties in this CBSA/metro. The rightmost column header cell is clicked to rank counties on the voter participation rate for the 2016 presidential election.

– click graphic for larger view.

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine a set of counties in a metro or state of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Regional Economic Information System: Annual Updates

.. which counties are experiencing the fastest economic growth? by what economic component? what does this look like on a per capita level?

.. access & analyze economic characteristics and patterns by county and state .. annual time series 1969 through 2015 with projections.  Personal income is the income available to persons for consumption expenditures, taxes, interest payments, transfer payments to governments and the rest of the world, or for saving. Use the interactive table to examine characteristics of counties and regions of interest. The table provides access to 31 personal income related summary measures. These data are a selection of a broader set of annual time series data from the Regional Economic Information System (REIS). REIS is a part of the ProximityOne State & Regional Income & Product Accounts (SRIPA) and Situation & Outlook (S&O) featuring current (2016) estimates and demographic-economic projections. Go to table.

Visual Analysis of Per Capita Personal Income Patterns
The following map shows the Houston metro (view profile) with bold brown boundary. Counties are labeled with county name and 2014 per capita personal income.

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-2014 by County
.. relative to U.S 2008-2014 change

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Interactive Analysis – County or State Profiles
The following graphic illustrate use of the interactive table to view an economic profile for Harris County, TX. Use the table to examine characteristics of any county or state. Click graphic for larger view.

Interactive Analysis
– comparing per capita personal income across counties
The next graphics illustrates use of the interactive table to rank/compare per capita personal income across counties. Rank/compare states. Choose any of the economic profile items. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Analyzing ACS 2014 1-Year Supplemental Data

.. examining 2014 characteristics of areas with population 20,000 and over  .. this section summarizes how to use the America Community Survey (ACS2014) “supplemental” data (ACS2014S) to access more current estimates than otherwise available. The America Community Survey “supplemental” data are just that, a supplemental set of ACS 2014 1-year estimates — for areas 20,000 population and over. See the related Web section providing more detail.

The importance of the ACS 2014S data are two fold.
1 – 2014 1-year estimates for a larger number of areas than available from the ACS 2014 1-year (ACS2014) estimates.
2 – more current (2014) data for those areas only available from the 5-year estimates (centric to 2012) that are between 20,000 and 65,000 population.

The ten cities/places with the highest 2014 median family income based on 1-year estimates were all under 65,000 population. These cities were not included in the ACS 2014 1-year standard estimates but were included in the ACS 2014 1-year supplemental estimates. See list below.

This section provides an overview of the ACS 2014 supplemental data and provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze characteristics of these areas. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual county demographic-economic projections. See schedule of related 2016 updates.

Scope of Expanded Geography Available
As shown in the table below, 2014 1-year “supplemental” estimates are available for more than twice as many counties from the ACS2014S compared to the ACS2014 “standard” 1-year estimates. However, there area a more limited set of subject matter data available from the ACS2014S data compared to both the ACS 2014 1-year and 5-year estimates.

MSA/MISA: Metropolitan Statistical Areas/Micropolitan Statistical Areas Counties: county and county equivalent

ACS 2014S Data Availability by County
The following graphic shows the additional counties for which ACS 2014 1-year estimates are available using the “supplemental” data.
• ACS 2014 1-year “standard” estimate counties — blue fill pattern
• ACS 2014 1-year “supplemental” estimate counties — orange fill pattern
• Only ACS 2014 5-year estimates available for remaining counties
Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view. The larger view shows metropolitan area (MSA) boundaries. Note that for example, ACS 2014 1 year data are available for all counties in the Austin and San Antonio metros (see pointer) — previously unavailable..

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. any CV XE GIS user can create this view using the default US1.GIS project

ACS2014S Tables — scroll section
The ACS 2014 supplemental data include 42 tables and a total of 229 data items. Br> The table number and descriptions are summarized below.

View full table/item detail in tables shells: ACS 2014S Table shells (xls)

ACS 2014 Selected Supplemental Items for Selected Geography
  — interactive table
The interactive table contains all geography for which the ACS2014S data have been tabulated for these geographies: U.S., state, county, city/place, 114th Congressional District, MSA/MISA, PUMA, urban area and school district. The table provides access to key selected items.

The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table. First cities/places were selected using the Type drop-down below the table. Next, the table is ranked in descending order on median family income. As shown in the graphic the largest 10 cities/places were under 65,000 population. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Population by Age, Gender & Race/Origin 2010-2015

.. tools to examine characteristics and patterns of U.S. & state population by age, gender & race/origin, 2010-2015 annually .. access individual state and area profiles.

What are the 10 states with the largest Hispanic population? How is Hispanic population distributed by age in the U.S. or any particular state? In which states does the Hispanic population comprise more than half of the total population? And by age? Get answers to these types of questions using data access and analytical tools described in this section.

Using the Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table. Tools are used to select only 2015 and show only the total and Hispanic columns, then rank in descending order on Hispanic population. It is easy to see which states have the largest Hispanic population and in relation to the total population.

Tip of the Iceberg
It’s not just about Hispanic and total population; perform similar queries/analyses by gender and for each of the five major race groups. These data are based on the latest Census Bureau 2015 model-based population estimates released in June 2016. The data options are not limited to the 2015 data; annual revised data for 2010 through 2015 are included. Find out about the size and trends for specific age groups of interest.

More about the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to perform other types of queries/analyses described above. Click a link in the table to view an extended profile for each area. The profiles are developed using the Regional Demographic-Economic Modeling System (RDEMS). When a profile is opened (new web page), analyze these population by age by gender by race/origin in context of related wide-ranging, multi-sourced data. Access the profiles for drill-down geography including counties and other areas.

Use the RDEMS current estimates (2016) and annual 5-year projections (to 2021) to examine this same scope of subject matter to the county level.

The interactive table includes a row for the U.S. and each state. Column structure and content are described below the table.
• Click the “link” (column 3) to view the RDEMS POP1 profile.
• See about more operations and usage notes below table.

Viewing Extended Profile for an Area
Clicking the link for Arizona, as illustrated above, shows the full “POP1” table/profile for Arizona. Clicking the link is equivalent to clicking this link: http://proximityone.com/rdems/1/rdems04000pop1.htm.
  • click the above link now to view the full profile.
  • California profile
  • Texas profile
  • Access any state using the interactive table

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State Demographic-Economic Briefing Notes

.. with the ever increasing availability of demographic and economic data, it can be difficult to access key up-to-date data for the U.S. and individual states, metros and counties … among other geography.

Here we look at the “tip of the iceberg” — intentionally. This section provides links to access State Demographic-Economic Briefing Notes. A summary of selected key demographic-economic measures and trends for each state are presented in comparison with the U.S. Use the Briefing Notes to facilitate briefings to others, collaboration and to obtain a snapshot of current and trending conditions. These data are mostly taken from the more detailed tables available as links at the bottom of each Briefing Notes section.

The Briefing Notes have been developed using the Regional Demographic-Economic Modeling System (RDEMS). The Briefing Notes sections and related detailed tables update frequently.

The per capita real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) estimates, new this past week from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, for 2010 and 2015 were added today. See how this comprehensive measure of economic well-being is trending and compares to the U.S. overall in states of interest.

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

America’s Million+ Population Cities

.. there are 10 million+ population cities in the U.S. .. each is reviewed in some detail in this section .. the change in U.S. city population from 2010 to 2015 ranged from growth of 357,979 in New York City to a decline of in Detroit, MI. New York City is actually five counties; the next largest city growth was Houston, TX with a 181,463 population gain. See cities with largest growth or decline using the interactive table.

The July 1, 2015 Census Bureau model-based estimates for the U.S. 19,505 incorporated cities show a total population of 202,066,769 compared to 192,179,239 as of Census 2010. These areas are incorporated cities as recognized by their corresponding state governments and granted certain governmental rights and responsibilities. ProximityOne integrates these estimates, with related data, in models to develop projections, examine change and assess the impact of change.

Largest 10 Cities — the Million-Plus Population Cities
The largest 10 cities in 2015, shown by this graphic taken from the interactive table below, are also the set of cities having 1 million or more population.

Locations and Attributes of the Largest 10 Cities
Locations of the largest 10 cities based on 2015 population are shown in the following graphic as red marker.

Examine demographic-economic attributes of these cities using these related individual city-focused sections.  These sections compare the city boundary/location with corresponding urbanized areas and include extended data from ACS 2012 and ACS 2014 1 year estimates presented in a comparative analysis format.
1. New York, NY
2. Los Angeles, CA
3. Chicago, IL
4. Houston, TX
5. Philadelphia, PA
6. Phoenix, AX
7. San Antonio, TX
8. San Diego, CA
9. Dallas, TX
10. San Jose, CA

City/Place Demographics in Context
State & Regional Demographic-Economic Characteristics & Patterns
.. individual state sections with analytical tools & data access to block level
Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook
.. continuously updated characteristics, patterns & trends for each/all metros

Visual Analysis of City/Place Population Dynamics
Use the CV XE GIS software with city/place GIS project to examine characteristics of city/place population, 2010-2015. The following view shows patterns of population percent change, 2010-15, by city in the Charlotte, NC/SC metro area.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click map for larger view and details including city name.

Individual million+ population city sections will be updated and the topic of separate future blog posts. Follow this blog to learn about updates to these and related sections.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.