Category Archives: Population Projections

TractWatch — Examining Small Area Change

Understanding the demographic-economic landscape for small area geography and how it is changing is vital for many stakeholders. Businesses and other organizations need to know how their market/service areas are changing … getting answers to questions like knowing about recent trends, where we are now and the how/where/how much things might change in the future.

Examining Tract Change
The following view shows census tracts (black boundary) located in the northeast Houston, TX area. Tracts are labeled with 2017 population estimates and percent population change from 2010 to 2017. Tract geography and characteristics are shown in context of three cities/places — Houston (orange cross-hatch), Humble (blue) and Atascocita CDP (green). It is easy to see what census tracts intersect with what cities and where. The pointer/hand is located in census tract 48-201-240902, partly intersecting with Humble city. The tract 2017 population of 12,984 reflects an increase of 10.4% since 2010. The dark brown bold boundary at the top of this tract is the Harris County, TX boundary.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. create views like this for any area in the U.S.; add your own data.

TractWatch tells us which tracts in a region of interest changed during the past year based on quarterly observable data with only a one quarter lag.

Census Tracts & TractWatch
TractWatch is a new tool/service focused on examining recent demographic-business change for each census tract. These approximate 74,000 geographic areas cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and averaged 4,000 population as of Census 2010. Tracts have a generally stable geography between decennial censuses and are coterminous with county boundaries. Tracts cover the U.S. with more than a 2-to-1 ratio compared to ZIP code areas (see tract-ZIP relationship table).

Integrated with Situation & Outlook
TractWatch insights are developed through the use of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook (S&O) database and information system — a part of S&O demographic-economic estimates and projections developed and updated annually. The 2017 vintage tract estimates and projections (annual data) cover the period 2010 through 2022 (5-year projection).

TractWatch – Monitoring Change
As a part of the S&O annual estimates and projections development, a range of measures are updated quarterly at the census tract level. Quarterly data are developed that include population, housing units, vacant units, households and business establishments.

There is only a one-quarter lag in the availability of observable census tract data. For example, observable 2017Q1 data can be added to the S&O database in July 2017. Data are analyzed and converted into a TractWatch national dataset.

Situation & Outlook Reports
The Situation & Outlook Reports (S&O Reports) are updated weekly, for the U.S. and each county, metro and state. TractWatch is a part of the “Recent Change and Outlook” S&O Report section and updated quarterly. See schedule of updates the shows when TractWatch is updated.

The S&O Reports (metro and county) Recent Change and Outlook section includes a list of census tracts which have shown significant change over the past year for that geography. A table of typically 10-to-25 key tracts are listed in a table with selected demographic-business change attributes.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Census 2020 LUCA Program and You

.. what would be the financial impact of a one-percent understatement in the Census 2020 population count? Many political districts are drawn based upon population change and shifts, and allocations of government funding and services are made based upon official population data. Consider this one specific example. For each one-percent of the Atlanta MSA population missed in Census 2020, potentially due to less than fully accurate address and location data, the financial impact could be on the order of $414 million per year. How and why? At margin, each person not counted in the decennial census results in a per capita disposable income loss for the area in the magnitude of $5,494 in 2000, and $6,770 per person in 2020. 61,100 people undercounted times $6,770 yields $414 million.

This section is about the Censue 2020 Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) program and how it might impact the reduction in undercount .. and make the data more accurate for wide-ranging needs and uses. Read on for details about the LUCA program.

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA MSA
The Atlanta metro shown with black bold boundary. More about this metro.

– View developed with CV XE GIS software.
– Click graphic to view patterns of neighborhood economic prosperity.

Financial Impact Details … the 2015 per capita current transfer payments (PCTP) in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta MSA were $6,132, up from $5,494 in 2010. The PCTP figure in 2020 may be $6,770. For each one-percent of the Atlanta MSA population (61,100 people) missed in Census 2020, potentially due to less than fully accurate address and location data, the financial impact could be in the order of $414 million (61,100 x $6,770) per year as of Census 2020.  $414 million per year based on the 2020 population and PCTP.

Financial Impact in Your Areas of Interest
Estimate the financial impact in your areas of interest. Get the 2010 and 2015 population and PCTP data from the REIS Interactive Table for any county or state.  Compute the 2020 population and PCTP values, potential undercount to determine the financial impact on an area of interest

Census 2020 LUCA Overview
The Census 2020 LUCA program is an initiative of the Census Bureau, partnering with thousands of state and local governments across the U.S. At the core of this program, Census provides address list data to communities; those communities compare those data with their own data and provide address/geographic updates back to the Census Bureau.  The updated address and geographic data are integrated into the TIGER/Line files  — geographic backbone for collecting and tabulating the Census results. This important MAF/TIGER address-plus update program will help insure improved accuracy for Census 2020. LUCA is a geographic data development program engaging local communities across the U.S.

ProximityOne works with local areas to improve the TIGER/Line files leading up to Census 2020. Using the CV XE GIS software and specialized expertise, we helped hundreds of governmental units, including all of the State of Georgia, improve the coverage and content of the TIGER/Line files and thus the accuracy and completeness of Census 2010.

The Census 2020 LUCA program is starting now in 2016.  See the full schedule and related details in the LUCA Web section.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Appalachia Region & County Population Trends

.. examining how is the Appalachia population changing and why .. Appalachia is a region that includes parts of 13 states and has long been challenged with poverty. The population of Appalachia increased from 25,184,339 in 2010 to 25,449,932 in 2015. The extended report below, developed using the ProximityOne Regional Data Analytics tool, in combination with GIS tools provide insights into why, how and where the population change has occurred since 2010.

Patterns of Appalachia County Population Trends 2010-2015
Appalachia counties are shown in the following graphic with the black bold boundary. The thematic pattern map shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2015. It is easy to see clusters of counties that are increasing or losing population and why. Counties increasing in population are shown by the dominant factor contributing to their growth — net migration or natural change (where births exceed deaths). Counties decreasing in population are shown by the dominant factor contributing to their population loss — net migration or natural change (where deaths exceed births). See more detail and access data via interactive table in the County Trends 2010-2015 section. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Summary of Population Change
Appalachia has increased in population since 2010 due to both net migration and natural increase. The analyses show that during the 2010 to 2015 period, the Appalachia population:
• increased by 1,688,832 births
• experienced 1,562,810 deaths
• had a natural increase (births less deaths) of 126,022 population
• increased by 166,990 net international migration
• increased by 53,209 net domestic migration
• had a net migration of 220,199 population

Region & County-by-County Population & Components of Change
The RDA report includes eight tables for each county and a summary for the Appalachia region. Tables displayed when using the “Population Estimates & Components” data include:
• Table 1 – total population
• Table 2 – births
• Table 3 – deaths
• Table 4 – natural change
• Table 5 – international migration
• Table 6 – domestic migration
• Table 7 – net migration
• Table 8 – group quarters population

Appalachia Counties & Region: Population Trends & Components of Change; 2010-2015
Click link below to view report. Data for all Appalachia counties, followed the regional summary, are provided table-by-table in the table sequence shown above.
Appalachia region population & components of change 2010-15

Terms of Use
The above report may be used for any purpose provided that:
1 – it is not used for commercial or consulting purposes.
2 – it is not used in funded research.
3 – all use is referenced as to source with Web URL:
— developed by ProximityOne based in part on Census Bureau data; http://proximityone.com/rda.htm.

Using the RDA Resources
Use the RDA tool to develop reports like the one shown here for counties and regions of interest. Possibly more importantly, these resources can help us examine related topics such as healthcare and education. What are the characteristics and requirements now and how are needs, services and capabilities distributed across a region? How will the population change over the next several years and possibly result in improving – or deteriorating – conditions? Use the RDA demographic insights features and predictive analytics to better assess future change and needs.

Contact ProximityOne (mention RDA in text section or call 888.364.7656) for more information about using the RDA resources or custom reports.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about accessing and using demographic-economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Data Analytics Lab session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Dallas, TX Metro Situation & Outlook

… examining characteristics, patterns and change for the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX metropolitan area … the total population of the metro changed from 6,452,725 in 2010 to 6,954,330 in 2014, a change of 501,605 (7.77%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 4 in 2010 and 4 in 2014, based on total population …
• How will the market for single family homes change over the next 5 years?
• How does economic prosperity in this metro compare to others?
• What are the patterns in metro rental income and rental vacancy rates?
• How do patterns vary within the metro by county/neighborhood?
• How are demographic-economic characteristics trending?

We examine these types of topics in this section. Stakeholders can replicate applications reviewed here for this and other metros. Select any metro.

.. this section now continuously updated … see Dallas Metro Situation & Outlook; see related Texas Demographic-Economic Characteristics.

Metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

Focus on Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA
This section is focused on the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA; Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) 19100. It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather review recent and trending decision-making data that can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights. The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro.
– See a more detailed version of this document focused on this metro.

The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA is shown in the graphic below. The 7-county metropolitan statistical area is shown with bold boundary; counties appear with black boundaries and county name/geographic code labels.

Click graphic for larger view and details. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Neighborhood
Median household income by census tract

Click graphic for larger view and map legend. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

Develop variations of this map view using the Mapping Texas Neighborhood Patterns GIS resources.

Fortune 1000 Companies
This metro is home to 40 Fortune 1000 companies including AT&T, American Airlines, Comerica, Dean Foods, Exxon Mobil, Fluor Corporation, J.C. Penney, Kimberly-Clark, Lennox International, Michaels Stores, Neiman Marcus, RadioShack, Southwest Airlines, Tenet Healthcare and many others.

Principal Cities
Metro principal cities (about principal cities) … click the link to view city profile   Arlington .. Dallas .. Denton .. Fort Worth .. Irving .. Plano .. Richardson

Overview of Selected Demographic-Economic Characteristics
The total population of the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX metro changed from 6,452,725 in 2010 to 6,954,330 in 2014, a change of 501,605 (7.77%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 4 in 2010 and 4 in 2014, based on total population. Annual net migration was 62,320 (2011), 77,089 (2012), 57,645 (2013), 74,176 (2014). View annual population estimates and components of change table.

This metro is projected to have a total population in 2020 of 7,418,541. The projected population change from 2010 to 2020 is 965,816 (15.0%). The population ages 65 years and over is projected to change from 592,695 (2010) to 1,031,937 (2020), a change of 439,242 (74.1%). See more about population projections.

Based on per capita personal income (PCPI), this metro was ranked number 61 in 2008 and 76 in 2014. among the 917 metros for which personal income was estimated.The PCPI changed from $44,697 in 2008 to $49,506 in 2014, a change of $4,809 (10.8%). Per capita personal income (PCPI) is a comprehensive measure of individual economic well-being. Use the interactive table to compare PCPI in this metro to other metros.

282 metropolitan statistical areas, of the total 381, experienced an increase in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) between 2009 and 2014. This metro ranked number 5 among the 381 metros based on 2014 GDP. The GDP (millions of current dollars) changed from $355,756 in 2009 to $504,358 in 2014 a change of $148,602 (41.77%). Real GDP (millions of real, inflation adjusted, dollars) changed from $355,756 in 2009 to $460,154 in 2014, a change of $104,398 (29.35%). GDP is the most comprehensive measure of metro economic activity. GDP is the sum of the GDP originating in all industries in the metro.

View additional selected details about the metro …
Population Characteristics & Trends
–  Component City Characteristics
–  Component County Characteristics
– General Demographic Characteristics
Housing Characteristics & Trends
Total Housing Units
General Housing Characteristics
Residential Construction; Housing Units Authorized & Value
Housing Price Index
Economic Characteristics & Trends
Economic Profile
– Gross Domestic Product
Establishments, Employment & Earnings by Type of Business
Labor Market Characteristics & Trends
Education Infrastructure
Component School District Characteristics
Component Higher Education Institution Characteristics

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about this metro, comparing this metro to peer group metros and use of data analytics to develop further detail related to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metros 2015: Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI

… examining Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI metropolitan area:
• How will the market for single family homes change over the next 5 years?
• How does economic prosperity in this metro compare to others?
• What are the patterns in metro rental income and rental vacancy rates?
• How do patterns vary within the metro by county/neighborhood?
• How are demographic-economic characteristics trending?

We examine these types of topics in this section. Stakeholders can replicate applications reviewed here for this and other metros. Select any metro.

Metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

Focus on Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI MSA
This section is focused on the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI MSA; Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) 33460. It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather illustrate how relevant decision-making information resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights. The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro.
– See a more detailed version of this document focused on this metro.

The Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI MSA is shown in the graphic below. The 20-county metropolitan statistical area is shown with bold boundary; counties appear with black boundaries and county name/geographic code labels.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

This metro is home to Fortune 1000 companies including 3M Company, Ameriprise Financial, Best Buy Co., General Mills, Inc., Land O’Lakes, Inc. and many others.

Metro principal cities (about principal cities) … click the link to view city profile   Bloomington .. Eagan ..  Eden Prairie .. Minneapolis .. Plymouth ..  St. Paul

The total population of the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI metro changed from 3,355,105 in 2010 to 3,495,176 in 2014, a change of 140,071 (4.17%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 16 in 2010 and 16 in 2014, based on total population. Annual net migration was 10,659 (2011), 10,100 (2012), 13,897 (2013), 10,762 (2014). View annual population estimates and components of change table. See more about population characteristics below.

This metro is projected to have a total population in 2020 of 3,698,877. The projected population change from 2010 to 2020 is 343,772 (10.2%). The population ages 65 years and over is projected to change from 372,335 (2010) to 603,936 (2020), a change of 231,601 (62.2%). See more about population projections.

Based on per capita personal income (PCPI), this metro was ranked number 37 in 2008 and 44 in 2014. The PCPI changed from $47,956 in 2008 to $53,166 in 2014, a change of $5,210 (10.9%). Per capita personal income (PCPI) is a comprehensive measure of individual economic well-being. Use the interactive table to compare PCPI in this metro to other metros.

The following thematic pattern shows a measure of economic prosperity (median household income: MHI) by census tract.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.
Develop variations of this map view using the Mapping Minnesota Neighborhood Patterns GIS resources.

View additional selected details about the metro …
–  Component City Characteristics
–  Component County Characteristics
–  Economic Profile
–  Component School District Characteristics

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about this metro, comparing this metro to peer group metros and use of data analytics to develop further detail related to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Researcher & Story Development Tools & Resources

Innovative and results-oriented story writing often requires geographic, demographic, economic and related data. Research results and stories must increasingly use graphics and visual renderings of data  to be effective, retain reader attention and be responsive to needs. A picture is worth a thousand words. In our expanding everything-integrated world, stories must draw on a range of authoritative data resources that can be knit-together.

Journalists and authors require easy and access to these data in a consumable form. Researchers and students share these needs. Grant writers benefit by including relevant data in proposals and well as unique maps and graphics. Economists and analysts creating interpretative summaries of statistical data releases (“how does this impact us?”) require related data and tools to effectively communicate conclusions and inferences.

This section reviews access to a few of these tools and resources that are available to researchers and story writers — as well as tools to map and otherwise visualize these data. These resources offer the customization or specific detail often not available to meet specific needs. Most of the resources reviewed here are available at no fee. Some resources are available only to ProximityOne User Groupmembers. Join the User Group now. See terms of use. See related Web section.

Navigating the Federal Statistical Resources
… topics below include these and a broader set of resources.
http://proximityone.com/fss.htm

Interactive Geographic-Demographic-Economic Tables
… view, query, rank, compare attributes for many types of geography.
http://proximityone.com/rankingtables.htm

Interactive Location-Based Demographic-Economic Data Tool
… key in address, immediate display of ACS demographic-economic data.
… block group, tract, place, county, state data; latitude-longitude, geocodes.
http://proximityone.com/location_based_demographics.htm

Custom Mapping Tools (Windows software tool)
… create custom maps for proposed service areas.
CV XE GIS

Address Code Your Data (Windows software tool)
… show your address/location data on maps.
http://proximityone.com/apigeocoder.htm

Chart Graphics; Population Pyramids (Windows software tool)
… age-cohort chart graphics for your county or school district.
http://proximityone.com/chartgraphics.htm

Demographic-Economic Data Extraction Tool (Windows software tool)
… use this API-tool to extract your selected subject matter data.
… census block, block group, other geographic levels
… Census 2000, Census 2010, ACS 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
… create your own files for use with Excel/other software.
http://proximityone.com/dede.htm

Custom maps can enhance your proposal; make custom map graphics:

Make Custom Congressional District Maps
… create custom maps for individual or custom grouped congressional districts.
… CD 113 and CD 114 boundaries are the same, based on maps submitted by states to the Census Bureau.
http://proximityone.com/cd113_maps.htm

Make Custom City Maps
… create custom maps for cities of interest; examine in context of other geography.
http://proximityone.com/citymaps.htm

Make Custom Metro Maps
… create custom maps for metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas.
http://proximityone.com/metromaps.htm

Make Custom Neighborhood Maps
… create thematic/pattern maps; access related demographic-economic data by neighborhood.
http://proximityone.com/neighborhood_patterns.htm

Make Custom Block Group Maps
… create custom maps for small, sub-neighborhood areas.
http://proximityone.com/mapping_bg.htm

Make Custom Census Block Maps
… create custom maps for areas by census block – smallest geographic area with detailed demographics.
http://proximityone.com/mapping_census_blocks.htm

America’s Communities Program
… demographic-economic profiles for individual cities.
http://proximityone.com/acp.htm

School District Community Profiles
… demographic-economic multi-part profiles for individual school districts.
http://proximityone.com/sddep.htm

School District Characteristics
http://proximityone.com/sddmi.htm

K-12 Public Schools Characteristics – individual and all schools
http://proximityone.com/k12publicschools.htm

K-12 Private Schools Characteristics – individual and all schools
http://proximityone.com/k12privatecchools.htm

Charter Schools Characteristics & Patterns – individual and all schools
http://proximityone.com/sch1314_charter.htm

County Population Trends; Annual Projections to 2020 by Age Group
… population trends profiles for individual counties … how is school age population changing? 65 & over?
http://proximityone.com/outlook2020.htm
most recent county official estimates – click link in table
county trend profile – example for Cook County, IL; all counties available

Metropolitan Area Characteristics
… geographic & demographic composition profiles for individual metros.
Current Vintage Metropolitan Areas
2015 Updates: New and Modified Metros
Metropolitan Area Median Income and Housing Value: 2013-14

State Legislative District Characteristics
… geographic & demographic composition profiles for individual state legislative districts.
http://proximityone.com/sld2013.htm

Congressional District Characteristics
… geographic & demographic composition profiles for individual congressional districts.
http://proximityone.com/cd113.htm
114th Congressional Districts: Median Income and Housing Value: 2013-14

Census Tract Demographic-Economic Patterns
Main Census Tracts section interactive tables includes all tracts:
General Demographics | Social Characteristics | Economic Characteristics | Housing Characteristics

ZIP Code Demographic-Economic Patterns
Main ZIP Code section … interactive tables include all ZIP code areas:
General Demographics | Social Characteristics | Economic Characteristics | Housing Characteristics

More about ProximityOne Demographic-Economic Projections
Outlook 2020 | Outlook 2030 | Outlook 2060 | Quarterly 3 year
• integrated multi-sourced Situation & Outlook demographic-economic data

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.