Category Archives: Micropolitan Statistical Area

Metro Population & Components of Change Trends 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine how the U.S. by metro population is changing. Is the population moving away or into metros of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

This section provides information on how and why the population is changing by metro from 2010 to 2016 in terms of components of change: births, deaths and migration. It provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by metro using latest Census Bureau estimates through 2016. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual demographic-economic projections.  See related Web page to access full interactive table and more detail.

Patterns of Population Change by Metro, 2010-2016
The following graphic shows how metros (MSAs – Metropolitan Statisticsl Areas) changed from 2010 to 2016 based on percent population change. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Narrative Analysis of Metro Demographic Change in Context
A narrative summary and analysis of metro demographic characteristics and change, contextually with other data and geography, is provided for each metro in the Situation & Outlook Reports. See more about the wide-ranging subject matter that are knitted together in the schedule of updates. Examine metro dynamics in context of the U.S. overall and related states and counties.

The nation’s 382 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) had a population of 277.1 million in 2016 (86% of the total population). MSAs increased by 2.3 million people from 2015. The nation’s 551 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs) had a population of 27.7 million in 2016 (9% of the total population). MISAs increased by 16,000 people from 2015. See more highlights below

MSAs and MISAs together, or metro areas, comprised the set of Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs). Each metro/CBSA is defined as a set of one or more contiguous counties.

Related Sections
• Metros Main
• Situation & Outlook Reports
• City/Place Population Trends
• County Population Trends
• County Population Projections to 2060
• ProximityOne Data Service

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

See more about these topics below:
• Natural Increase/Change; birth & deaths
• Migration; net international, net domestic, net migration

Using the Interactive Table – Peer Group Analysis
Use the full interactive table to examine U.S. national scope metros by population and components of change. Consider an application where you want to study metros having a 2016 population between 250,000 and 300,000. Use the tools below the interactive table to select these metros as illustrated in the graphic shown below. The graphic shows these metros ranked on the overall U.S. metro rank (percent population change 2010-2016). As shown in the graphic, the Greeley, CO metro was ranked 11th among all metros and the fastest growing metro in this group. Use the tools/buttons below the table to create custom views.

Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Using ACS County Data

… we are always seeking the most current data for areas of interest. This section provides an update on accessing unpublished ACS 1-year data for many counties.  Learn about how you can access ACS 1-year estimates for 85 counties for which Census released only as 5-year estimates … and why it matters. See the corresponding full Web section.

Data are tabulated from the Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) as 1-year estimates (for areas with population 65,000 and over) and as 5-year estimates (for areas under 65,000 population). See more about ACS 1-year versus 5-year estimates in this section.

ACS 2014 1-year tabulation areas, as released by the Census Bureau included 817 of 3142 counties and 508 of 917 metros/CBSAs. There are 85 counties for which ACS 2914 1-year estimates were not released by Census but are derivable by subtracting the aggregate county components from metro totals in selected metros.

County & Metro ACS 2014 1-year Estimates
The following graphic shows Texas and adjacent areas:
• ACS 2014 1-year estimates metros with bold brown boundaries
• Counties for which ACS 2014 1-year data were tabulated and released (green).
• Counties for which ACS 2014 1-year data are derivable but not released as tabulation areas (blue).

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click map for larger view and details.

The next view shows a zoom-in to the Austin, TX metro. The four green shaded counties had ACS 2014 1-year estimates tabulated and released. The fifth Austin metro county, Caldwell shaded blue, was not tabulated but the ACS 1-year data are derivable by subtracting the sum of the four counties from the metro totals. Tabulated data for Caldwell was released only as ACS 2014 5-year estimates. A similar situation exists in many metros across the country.

Why this Matters
There are 85 counties for which ACS 2014 1 year data are available but not released/made available by Census as separately tabulated areas. This is important due to these considerations:
• these are true annual estimates (as opposed to the other 5-year estimated counties)
• they are more recent that 5-year estimates
• they reflect conditions centric to one year
• they enable time series/trend analysis
• [as it turns out] they enable access to 1 year estimates for all counties (instead of some) in some metros

Using API Tools to Examine these Data
Create CSV-like files by clicking these links. When a link is clicked a new page will show the ACS 2014 1-year estimates tabulations areas. The area name, code and ACS 2014 1-year total population estimate is shown.
Click to retrieve county data
Click to retrieve metro data

Items used in these API calls:
.. B01001_001E – Total population
.. B19013_001E – Median household income ($)
.. B19113_001E – Median family income ($)
.. B19301_001E – Per capita income

Create/derive these data on your own; learn about which counties are derivable …

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

 

Using CV XE GIS: New GIS Start-up Project

.. expanding insights through data analytics ..  a new CV XE GIS start-up project, described in this section, is now part of the CV XE GIS installer. The latest GIS project uses U.S. national scope shapefiles newly developed as of April 2016. You can immediately start using this GIS project in a production manner. See more below. Join in the weekly Data Analytics Lab sessions where structure and use of this project and shapefiles are discussed. See the Web version of this section.

It is recommended that existing users re-install the CV XE GIS software. In addition to the new US1 GIS project, there are software updates. Software updates and related applications will be reviewed in upcoming blog sections focused on “Using CV XE GIS.”

Join the ProximityOne User Group and start using the new US1 GIS project — included with all versions of CV XE GIS software.

National scope state, metro and county layers are all active upon start-up. States are transparent showing only boundaries. Metros/CBSAs reflect a query that has been set to show only the largest 10 metros (based on 2015 population). The county layer shows a thematic pattern map of the population percent change between 2010 and 2015.

CV XE GIS US1 Project Start-up View
The start-up view shows a thematic pattern map of percent population change, 2010-2015.  Click graphic shown below for a larger. more detailed view. Expand browser window for best quality larger graphic viewing.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

The US1 GIS project includes these shapefiles/resources:
• U.S. by State
• U.S. by Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) – 929 metropolitan areas
• U.S. by County – 3,142 county areas
• OpenStreetMaps Web-based tiling layer
• each shapefile includes integrated Census 2010 population and annual population estimates 2010 through 2015.

Full User Interface View

The legend panel, shown below at left of map window, includes seven layers. Five layers are checked on; this results in
the layer being displayed in the map window. The metros and counties layers are included twice; the upper, unchecked, layer is set to show area names as labels.

Applications
• Use the navigation tools to zoom to an area of interest.
.. for example, zoom-in to the Houston metro (click for larger view).
   
• Determine which counties, metros or states are changing most rapidly.
.. and how they are changing.
• Use the latest official population estimates.
• Easily compare county components of a metro to total metro.
• Use the navigation tools to zoom to an area of interest.
.. for example, zoom-in to the Houston metro (any metro).
• Use layer editor tools to add labels, modify intervals/colors, change/add patterns and more.
.. for example, check-on the county labels layer to easily view county names..
• Add other layers showing different types of geography and subject matter.
• Integrate other types of subject matter into the existing shapefiles.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

County Population Trends 2010-2015

.. examining the how and why of U.S. population change by county from 2010 to 2015. This section provides an overview of this topic and provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by county using latest Census Bureau estimates data through 2015. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual county demographic-economic projections. See related Web section for more detail.

Patterns of Population Change by County, 2010-2015
The following graphic shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2015. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. see related drill-down views of Texas by county

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

See more about these topics below:
Natural Increase/Change; birth & deaths
Migration; net international, net domestic, net migration

Interactive Analysis
Use the interactive table to view population trends and components of change for selected counties. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used.
• Click the ShowAll button (below table)
• Click the Pop Min & Max button .. refreshes table
    to show only counties with 2015 population 250,000-300,000
• Click ChgCols button to show all 2010-15 change columns
• Click PopChg 2010-15 header column to sort.

Resulting view:
Among these counties, Horry County, SC has the largest 2010-15 population change. The peer group counties are shown in rank order.

– Click graphic for larger view.
– experiment with settings of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metro Situation & Outlook Reports Updated

.. how are metros of interest changing? The Metro Situation & Outlook Reports provide the premier integrated, multi-sourced demographic-economic overview for individual metropolitan areas.

Largest 25 Metros Based on 2015 Population
Click graphic for larger view with names. Expand browser window for best view. Label shows metro rank among all 917 metros based on 2015 population.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

The no fee report for each metro was updated today with the annually updated population and population components of change. Use this interactive table to view, query, rank metros. Examine total population annually 2010 to 2015 and rankings.

Click on a link in the interactive table to view the integrated, multi-sourced demographic-economic Situation & Outlook report for that metro. See this example for the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA. The metro report provides drill-down demographic-economic attributes of metro component areas including counties, cities and school districts.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Tip of the Day: Median Rent by Metro

.. tip of the day .. a continuing weekly or more frequent tip on developing, integrating, accessing and using geographic, demographic, economic and statistical data. Join in .. click Follow button at upper right.

.. the most recent estimate of median gross rent [for occupied housing units paying rent] for metropolitan areas (core-based statistical areas) is as of 2014. These data are based on the American Community Survey (ACS2014) 1-year estimates.

Option 1. Use the interactive table:
– go to http://proximityone.com/usstcbsa14dp4.htm
– median gross rent is item H132.
– scroll left on the table until H132 appears in the header column
– this column shows the 2014 ACS 1-year estimate for H132 for all CBSAs
    (and states)
– see usage notes below table.

Option 2. Use the API operation:
click this link to get H132 (median rent) using the API tool.
– a new page displays showing a line/row for each metro.
– median rent appears on the left, then metro name and code.
– optionally save this file and import the data into a preferred program.
– more about API tools.

Option 3. View the median rent in context of other attributes for a metro.
click a link in this table to select a metro of interest.
– when the metro profile displays, see section 5.2.

See this related section on metro rental markets.

This section is focused on median rent. Many other subject matter items will be apparent when these methods are used. Optionally adjust above details to view different subject matter for metros.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing demographic-economic data. Learn more about using these data and tools to meet specific interests.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Tools to Analyze the Local Area Employment Situation

.. December 2015; updated monthly … current, monthly data on the employment situation are essential to assess recent trends. The only historical source of these data for all metropolitan areas, counties and sub-county areas is the Bureau of Labor Statistics (about these data). The civilian labor force, employment, unemployment and unemployment rate are estimated monthly with only a two month lag between the reference date and the data access date (e.g., February 2016 data are available in April 2016). Historical monthly seasonally adjusted and non-adjusted time-series data are available. Use tools and resources provided/described in this section to access and analyze these Local Area Employment Situation (LAES) data. See related Web page with interactive ranking table.

Unemployment Rate by Metro
The following graphic shows the unemployment rate by metro.
— view created using CV XE GIS and associated LAES GIS Project

The LAES data and this section are updated monthly. The LAES data, and their their extension, are part of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook database and information system. ProximityOne extends the LAES data in several ways including monthly update projections of the employment situation one year ahead.

Use the interactive table in the related Web page to view, sort, compare employment situation characteristics by Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) — metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas.

Analyze Labor Market Characteristics in Context of Other Data
The Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook Reports provide a labor market characteristics monthly time-series table. Select a metro using this interactive table. Examine the labor market data in context with wide-ranging related demographic-economic data.

Visual Pattern and GeoSpatial Analysis
Use the CV XE GIS software and LAES GIS project to create thematic pattern maps and integrate the employment situation data with other data. ProximityOne User Group members may install the LAES GIS Project at no fee and prepare thematic pattern maps like the one shown above and below. The map shown below shows the unemployment rate for each CBSA for a year earlier than the above map. Compare the maps and see how patterns have changed.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated LAES GIS Project

Using the LAES GIS Project
Use the LAES GIS Project to develop maps, such as those shown above, and perform geospatial analysis operations. The LAES GIS Project updates monthly as new data become available. The CBSA layer/shapefile includes monthly civilian labor force, employment, unemployment and unemployment rate estimates for each month from January 2014 through the most recent estimate month (e.g., the December 2015 release includes monthly data from January 2014 through October 2015). Steps to develop custom thematic pattern maps are summarized below (requires Windows computer with Internet connection)
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the LAES GIS project fileset
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now, no fee)
… unzip LAES GIS project files to local folder c:\laes
3. Open the c:\laes\laes1.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named c:\laes\laes1.gis
4. Done. The start-up view is shown at top of this section.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss accessing, integrating and using these data with other data that relate to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.