Tag Archives: American Community Survey

Creating Custom Demographic Datasets with API Tools

.. develop national scale spreadsheet files with virtually no learning time .. easy-to-use API operations to create national scope demographic-economic datasets based on American Community Survey 2016 1-year estimates .. custom subject matter selections. See more detail in related web sections ACS2016 and ACS2016_API.

Benefits and utility … how to acquire a spreadsheet showing the population of all cities with population estimates based on the ACS 2016 1-year data? … or, housing units, median household income, median housing value, etc.? Variations of this need frequently arise — what is the list of largest California counties sorted on total population: What are the 25 metros having the highest median household income? Which 10 congressional districts have the highest poverty incidence? Which urban areas have the highest educational attainment?

Use simple API calls described below to get answers to these types of questions — and more.  Create files that can be used for recurring applications. An example …

Urban Areas with 2016 Population 65,000+ Population
… results from using the API downloaded data … the following graphic shows urban areas with 65,000 or more 2016 population; zoom-in to Texas. The full national scope GIS project is available as described below; examine U.S. or any region. The file used to develop this view was created using the results of the API call reviewed below (requires integration of those data into the urban areas shapefile). Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window. Larger view shows urban areas labeled with name and mini profile for Dallas UA showing all subject matter items downloaded (via API) as described below.

… View developed using CV XE GIS.
… See more about Urban Population & Urban Areas.

Access ACS 2016 1-Year Data Using API Tools
Here are the API links … use these API calls to access/download selected items for selected geographies. See more about using API tools. Click a link and receive a return page with CSV-like structured data. See usage notes below. As these are ACS 2016 1 year estimates; geographies are only available for areas 65,000+ population.
Click a link:
• All U.S. cities/places
• All U.S. counties
• All U.S. CBSAs
• All U.S. Urban Areas
• All 115th Congressional Districts
• All U.S. states
• U.S. only

The following data retrieval operations are by state. These are examples using Arizona (FIPS state code 04).
• All [within state] Elementary School Districts
• All [within state] Secondary School Districts
• All [within state] Unified School Districts

API Call Returned Data Usage Notes
Clicking the All U.S. cities/places link above generates a new page with content very much like a CSV file. Try it .. click an above link.

See the related ACS2016_API web section for more details.

Items Retrieved in the API Calls
The sample header record above shows the subject matter item listed at the left in the following set of items. Modify API call and use other subject matter items. See full array of subject matter – xlsx file.
.. B01003_001E – Total population
Age
.. B01001_011E — Male: 25 to 29 years (illustrating age cohort access)
.. B01001_035E — Female: 25 to 29 years (illustrating age cohort access)
Race/Origin
.. B02001_002E – White alone
.. B02001_003E – Black or African American alone
.. B02001_004E – American Indian and Alaska Native alone
.. B02001_005E – Asian alone
.. B02001_006E – Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone
.. B02001_007E – Some other race alone
.. B02001_008E – Two or more races
.. B03001_003E – Hispanic (of any race)
Income
.. B19013_001E – Median household income ($)
.. B19113_001E – Median family income ($)
Housing & Households
.. B25001_001E – Total housing units
.. B25002_002E – Occupied housing units (households)
.. B19001_017E — Households with household income $200,000 or more
.. B25003_002E — Owner Occupied housing units
.. B25075_025E — Housing units value $1,000,000 to $1,499,999
.. B25075_026E — Housing units with value $1,500,000 to $1,999,999
.. B25075_027E — Housing units with value $2,000,000 or more
.. B25002_003E – Vacant housing units
.. B25077_001E – Median housing value ($) – owner occupied units
.. B25064_001E – Median gross rent ($) – renter occupied units

The rightmost fields/columns in the rows/records contain the area name and geographic codes.

Using API Tools for Data Analytics
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on L

State of the States: Demographic Economic Update

.. tools and resources to examine the demographic-economic state of the states .. in 2016, the U.S. median housing value was $205,000 while states ranged from $113,900 (Mississippi) to $592,000 (Hawaii). See item/column H089 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on this measure … in context of related housing characteristics. These data uniquely provide insights into many of the most important housing characteristics.

Use new tools, data and methods to access, integrate and analyze demographic-economic conditions for the U.S. and states. These data will update in September 2018.

Approximately 600 subject matter items from the American Community Survey ACS 2016 database (released September 2017) are included in these four pages/tables:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics
• Economic Characteristics
• Housing Characteristics

GIS, Data Integration & Visual Data Analysis
Use data extracted from these tables in a ready-to-use GIS project. These ACS sourced data (from the four tables listed above) have been integrated with population estimates trend data, components of change and personal income quarterly trend data. See details in this section.

Examining Characteristics & Trends
Below are four thematic pattern maps extracted from the main sections listed above. Click a map graphic for a larger view. Use the GIS project to create variations of these views.

Patterns of Median Age by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows median age. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column D017 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on median age.

Patterns of Educational Attainment by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows % college graduates. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column S067 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on percent college graduates.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows $MHI. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column E062 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on median household income.

Patterns of Median Housing Value by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows $MHV. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column H089 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on median housing value.

Examining Characteristics & Trends; Using Data Analytics
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Tools to Analyze County Demographic-Economic Characteristics

.. demographic-economic characteristics of counties are essential for business development, market analysis, planning, economic development, program management and general awareness of patterns and trends. This section provides access to data and tools to examine these data for all counties in the U.S. This annual update includes geographic area characteristics based on ACS 2015 data.  The tools/data are organized into four related sections summarized below.

1. General Demographics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp1.htm
Patterns of School Age Population by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county general demographics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns of percent population ages 5 to 17 years of age by county — item D001-D004-D018 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

2. Social Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp2.htm 
Patterns of Educational Attainment by County
– percent college graduate
Use GIS tools to visually examine county social characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns of percent college graduate by county — item S067 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

3. Economic Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp3.htm 
Patterns of Median Household Income by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county economic characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns median household income by county — item E062 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

4. Housing Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp4.htm 
Patterns of Median Housing Value by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county housing characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns median housing value by county — item E062 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Largest School Districts Enrollment Characteristics

..  while school district enrollment is reported by school districts, only public school enrollment is reported. Public and private school enrollment are available by district from the American Community Survey (ACS 2015).  With few exceptions, school districts do not report on demographic-economic characteristics of the school district.  These data are only available from ACS. See the related interactive table to access and compare enrollment characteristics of school districts of interest.

In 2015, there were 1,016 school districts with total population of 65,000 or more (of total 14,650) for which “1-year estimates” were tabulated.  These estimates are based on respondent data for calendar year 2015.  This section summarizes selected enrollment characteristics of the largest districts and provides access to much more detail for each of these districts.

Largest 10 School Districts
The following graphic shows the largest 10 school districts based on the size of the 2015 school age population ages 5-to-17. Click graphic for larger view.

Mapping the Largest School Districts
The following graphic shows locations of the largest school districts as red markers. Click graphic for larger view that opens in a new window. Expand browser window for bets quality view. The larger view shows school district locations on context of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs).

  view created using CV XE GIS software and related GIS project.

School Districts Tabulated in ACS 2015
ACS 2015 data are tabulated for 14,650 school districts (among many other wide-ranging geography). The following table shows the number of districts for which 1-year estimates and 5-year estimates are tabulated. There are 1,016 districts for which 1-year estimates were tabulated.

These data show enrollment of residents of the district whether enrolled in that district or otherwise. Enrollment data are provided for preschool, K-12 and college and not enrolled.

Using the School District Enrollment Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table (click that link to use the table) showing enrollment in kindergarten by school district ranked in descending order.

– click graphic for larger view.

Using the table, you can select total, public or private enrollment for selected grade ranges.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

New ACS 2015 1-Year Demographic-Economic Data

.. essential data to assess where we are, how things have changed and how things might change in the future down to the sub-neighborhood level. The American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide annually updated demographic-economic data for national and sub-national geography. ACS provides a wide range of important data about people and housing for every community across the nation. The results are used by everyone from planners to retailers to homebuilders and issue stakeholders like you. ACS is a primary source of local data for most of the 40 topics it covers, such as income, education, occupation, language and housing. ProximityOne uses ACS to develop current estimates on these topics and 5-year projections. This section is focused on ACS 2015 data access, integration and use and is progressively updated.

New ACS 2015 1-year estimates are available as of September 15, 2016.

Importance of ACS: Assessing Demographic-Economic Change
Oil prices plummeted in late 2014. How has this affected people and households in areas hardest hit? Find out for wide-ranging geographies using the ACS 2015 1-year estimates. Compare to ACS 2014 1-year estimates. Use the ACS 2016 1-year estimates (September 2017) to see how the impact has continued. Demographic-economic conditions change for many reasons; oil price changes are just one.

Keep informed about ACS developments and related tools and applications:
• Updates are sent to ProximityOne User Group members (join here).
… access special extract files and GIS projects available to members.
• ACS updates and applications are covered in the Data Analytics Blog.
• ACS data access, integration & use … join us in a Data Analytics Lab session.

In the weeks ahead, the following ProximityOne information resources will be updated with new ACS 2015 1-year data:
U.S.-State-Metro Interactive Tables
• Demographic component section of Metro Situation & Outlook Reports .. example for Dallas metro
• Housing characteristics component section of Metro Situation & Outlook Reports .. example for Dallas metro
Demographic-Economic Trend Profiles
• Special study reports.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Children’s Demographics by School District

.. data and tools to analyze children’s demographics by school district ..  the ACS 2014 median household income for the Houston ISD, TX (HISD) was $46,069 (all households) compared to $41,896 (grade relevant children’s households). How does economic prosperity (or choose from many other attributes) vary between the total population of an area and to those of total children or grade relevant children by type of enrollment in districts of interest? See related Web section with interactive table.

This section summarizes data and tools to access to the children’s demographic-economic data, based on the 2014 American Community Survey (ACS 2014) school district special tabulation (SDST), for each/all school districts. These data provide insights into the population, social, economic and housing characteristics of total children and grade relevant children — in contrast to the total population and housing. Use the interactive table below to view, rank, compare, query children’s characteristics.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by School District; Children’s Households
— Median Household Income for Grade Relevant Children Households
The following thematic map shows patterns of median household income for grade relevant children households by school district for Texas and adjacent states. Click graphic for larger view (shows metros). Expand browser to full extent for best quality view.

View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.

Additional Views:
Dallas metro area
Houston metro area
Los Angeles metro area

Importance of these Data
The annually updated SDST data are a unique source of data to help stakeholders understand demographic-economic characteristics of total children as well as grade relevant children. The real power of these data is that they enable analysis of children’s living characteristics by type of enrollment (enrolled in public school, enrolled in private school, not enrolled) by school district. For example, in this Houston ISD, TX profile it can be determined that of those grade relevant children who ‘speak English less than “very well”.
– enrolled in public school
… 36,995 or 18.7% of total grade relevant children enrolled public
– enrolled in private school
… 810 or 3.9% of total grade relevant children enrolled private (very low)
– not enrolled
… 3,265 or 30.9% of total grade relevant children not enrolled (very high)

How does Houston ISD compare to Dallas ISD? … to Los Angeles Unified? … use these data to find out. Whether ability to speak English, or other living/demographic environmental characteristics, these are among the factors that can primarily influence educational outcomes.

Comparing the Number of Households
The total number of households compared to the number of households with grade relevant children is often in the range of 3-to-4 to 1. The following table shows illustrative examples for selected districts.

Scope of the School District Special Tabulation
The School District Special Tabulation is a tabulation of the characteristics of children who reside within the boundaries of a school district. Note that such residents/children might attend a school located outside of the school district of residence. Subject matter items are tabulated for these seven universes:
• all children — population ages 0-19, 18 & 19 not high school graduates
• all school age, grade relevant children
– children enrolled
– children enrolled in public school
– children enrolled in private school
– relevant children not enrolled
See about related data

Children’s Demographics by Type of Enrollment
  — Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to rank districts by total relevant children and views percentage distributions by type of enrollment. Note that among the largest 10 districts, Las Vegas (Clark County, NV) has the largest percent not enrolled (12.x% — far right column). Use the full interactive table to compare contrast district based on your criteria.

– click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn

Navigating the U.S. Federal Statistical System

.. an overview of the Federal statistical system and how to access data  .. the U.S. Federal Statistical System offers a vast array of diverse data resources that are useful in wide-ranging planning and analytical applications. Many of these data resources, such as census block level demographics from the decennial census, are unique in scope and content; in many cases there are no alternative data resources.

But there are issues/challenges for the data user to navigate the Federal Statistical System. Examples … the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases total employment data by county quarterly and monthly through multiple programs. The data values differ, for methodological reasons, but the net result can be confusion. The Census Bureau releases total employment data from many statistical programs by county both annually and more frequently. Where are these alternative total employment data and how can they be accessed? How do these various measures differ and which data are right for my situation? This section provides basic statistical program information. Subsequent updates will provide more detail.

This section provides an overview of the U.S. Federal Statistical System (FSS) and information that can help stakeholders navigate access to selected types of data produced by the FSS. While the FSS is focused on agencies that collect, develop and make available statistical data, there is a broader set of data and resources that relate to accessing and using these data. As technology and related data analytics resources have evolved, access to and use of these data is closely associated with the development of geographic data by Federal statistical and other agencies and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

The FSS is a decentralized set of agencies that collect, develop and make available statistical and geographic data. The OMB Office of Statistical Programs and Standards (SPS) provides a FSS coordinative role. The SPS establishes statistical policies and standards, identifies priorities for improving programs, evaluates statistical agency budgets, reviews and approves Federal agency information collections involving statistical methods, and coordinates U.S. participation in international statistical activities.

While the FSS spans more than 100 agencies, the 13 “principal statistical agencies” have statistical work as their principal mission. Excluding funding for the decennial census ($919.3 million requested for the Decennial Census for FY 2016), approximately 38 percent ($2,486.9 million of the $6,486.6 million total proposed for FY 2016 President’s budget request) of overall funding for Federal statistical activities (of the Executive Branch) provides resources for these 13 agencies. The principal statistical agencies include:
Census Bureau (Commerce)
Bureau of Economic Analysis (Commerce)
Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice)
Bureau of Labor Statistics (Labor)
Bureau of Transportation Statistics (Transportation)
Economic Research Service (Agriculture)
Energy Information Administration (Energy)
National Agricultural Statistics Service (Agriculture)
National Center for Education Statistics (Education)
National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/HHS)
National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics NSF/Independent
Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics — SSA/Independent
Statistics of Income (IRS)

The remaining 62 percent of the FY 2016 budget involves more than 100 programs that conduct statistical activities in conjunction with another program mission. These statistical programs are components within a Federal department or other agency. They include a broad set of centers, institutes, and organizations in addition to the 13 principal statistical agencies.

There are also Federal agencies whose statistical activities are not part of the Executive Branch. These agencies include the Congressional Budget Office, which develops and applies projection models for the budgetary impact of current and proposed Federal programs; the Federal Reserve Board, which compiles the widely used Flow of Funds report and other statistical series and periodically conducts the Survey of Consumer Finances; and the U.S. Government Accountability Office, which uses statistical data in evaluations of government programs.

Guide to Navigating the Federal Statistical System
The following graphic is a snapshot of the Guide to Navigating the Federal Statistical System. See http://proximityone.com/fss.htm to access the entire guide.

– click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn