Tag Archives: Maps

New 2018 Vintage Metropolitan Areas

.. new, September 14, 2018 vintage, Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) delineations have been released by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB).  Among other things, the new delineations specify which counties are included in each CBSA.  CBSAs. an OMB standards term, are metropolitan areas comprised of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (now 384 MSAs in the U.S.) and Micropolitan Statistical Areas (now 542 MISAs in the U.S.).

How Metros Change Geographically
The following graphic, focused on the Charlotte, NC-SC MSA region, illustrates how MSAs are changing. 2017 vintage MSAs are shown with bold green boundary, yellow fill pattern. Cross-hatched areas are 2018 vintage MSA counties. As of the 2018 vintage, note that …
• Anson County, NC (to right of pointer) has been added to the Charlotte, NC-SC MSA.
• Union County, SC has been removed from the Spartanburg, SC MSA.
• Harnett County, NC has been added to the Fayetteville, NC MSA.

— graphic developed using CV XE GIS software and related GIS project.

What About My MSAs of Interest?
See detailed information about the 2018 vintage CBSAs/MSAs and their component counties at http://proximityone.com/cbsa2018.htm.

Impact of the 2018 Delineations
The new delineations take place immediately and have numerous impacts.  Going forward, Federal statistical agencies will develop statistics and use the new names and geocodes as set forth in the new delineations (most names and geocodes remain the same).  For CBSAs affected, which are numerous, this will result in challenges for longitudinal analyses where consistently defined geography over time is required.  The total 2017 official population estimates are affected for three of the largest 10 CBSAs using the 2018 delineations compared to the 2017 delineations.  More immediately, it may become confusing whether the 2018, 2017, 2015, or an earlier vintage CBSA geography is being referenced.  On a positive note, the 2018 vintage CBSAs are believed to best reflect the set of counties comprising a CBSA as an entity of highly related demographic-economic conditions.

Keeping Up-to-Date with Metro Demographic-Economic Data
Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs/metros), comprised of one or more contiguous counties, are important for many reasons. Business, demographic and economic data for these 384 areas, each developed around an area of large population concentration, provide a “10,000 foot” view of these characteristics and how they are changing. As they are comprised of county groups, much of the subject matter data are also available for drill-down analysis at the county and sub-county levels. Metro boundaries change some over time … as more peripheral counties are added or removed depending on their demographic-economic affinity with central county(s).

Metros are an important part of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook program. Metro demographic-economic estimates and projections are updated to reflect 2018 vintage metros. This includes all elements of the Census-sourced age-race/ethnicity-gender annual estimates and American Community Survey demographic-economic subject matter.

Designating Metros and Delineating Metro County Components
More detail … in consultation with Federal statistical agencies, OMB defines metropolitan statistical area boundaries. This section provides a summary of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), and component Metropolitan Division and Counties/County Equivalents, as delineated in OMB Bulletin 18-04 issued September 14, 2018. These delineations take place immediately. This is a significant update affecting approximately 20-percent of previous MSA delineations (one or more county addition or removal).

Under the September 14, 2018 delineation, there are 938 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs) in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, collectively referred to as Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs). There are 392 MSAs (384 in the U.S. and 8 in Puerto Rico). 11 MSAs contain a total of 31 Metropolitan Divisions. There are 546 MISAs (542 in the United States and 4 in Puerto Rico).

The 384 U.S. MSAs comprise 1,181 counties of total 3,142 U.S. counties. The total 2017 population of these metros was 280,468,904 of total 325,719,178 U.S. population (86.1%).

See related sections:
• Metros Main Section
• Metros Situation & Outlook Reports
.. click link in column 3 in table in above page to view detailed report
• Metro Demographic-Economic Interactive Tables
• County Population/Components of Change Interactive Table

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining State-to-State Geographic Mobility

.. tools, resources and insights to examine U.S. by state migration 2011-2017 and migration flows in 2016 .. this post is an excerpt from the more detailed Web page http://proximityone.com/statemigration.htm.

In examining future demographic trends, the most challenging component of change to project (develop data values into the future) is migration. Migration, comprised net domestic and net international migration, is a function of many factors whose cause and effect behavior can change year by year, and geographic area by area. While this section is focused on states, the same scope of data is available to the county and sub-county levels. In this section, U.S. by state migration is examined using two data sources: annual population and components of change model-based estimates (2010-2017 model-based estimates) and annual American Community Survey estimates (ACS 2016 estimates). While these Census Bureau programs are highly related, the migration data/subject matter differ some.

State Net Domestic Migration, 2011-2017
The following graphic shows patterns net domestic migration for the period 2011-2017, based on the model-based estimates. The patterns of migration change, direction and magnitude are immediately evident. Click on the graphic to see a larger view showing more detail. Expand browser to full screen for best quality view. The larger view shows a portion of a mini-profile for Florida. The mini-profile illustrates how these data are comprised … annual net domestic migration estimates and the sum over the years 2011-2017. See the interactive table to view these data, and related components of change, in a tabular, numeric form. Use the GIS project (details here) to create similar views for any state; visual analysis of outmigration for any state showing outmigration by destination state. Label areas as desired. Add other layers. Add your own data.

View created with CV XE GIS. Click graphic for larger view with more detail.

State OutMigration by Destination State
The model-based estimates, reviewed above, do not provide detail on state-to-state migration. Those data are provided by the related ACS 2016 estimates. Note that the ACS 2016 1-year estimates are for the calendar year 2016. From these data we can get the following migration detail … In 2016, there were an estimated 605,018 people who moved from a residence 1 year earlier, in a different state, to Florida. Florida experienced the largest number of movers (inflows) from other states among all states. 60,472 of these movers were from New York. See the interactive table in this section to examine similar characteristics for any state. These data are based on the 2016 ACS 1 year estimates. See about related data.

The American Community Survey (ACS) asks respondents age 1 year and over whether they lived in the same residence 1 year ago. For people who lived in a different residence, the location of their previous residence is collected. The state-to-state migration flows are created from tabulations of the current state (including the District of Columbia) of residence crossed by state of residence 1 year ago.

Movers Within and Between States & Selected Areas During 2016
Use the interactive table to examine state outmigration by destination state. View, compare, query, rank and export data of interest.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
.. is my area urban, rural or …
.. how do census blocks relate to congressional district? redistricting?
.. how can I map census block demographics?
Join me in a Data Analytics Web Session, every Tuesday, where we review access to and use of data, tools and methods relating to GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning. We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

How America’s Cities are Changing

… tools, data and insights into how America’s cities are changing, 2010-to 2017.  Of the nation’s 325.7 million people, an estimated 205.0 million (62.9%) live within an incorporated place as of July 1, 2017. Of approximately 19,500 incorporated places, about 76 percent had fewer than 5,000 people and nearly 50 percent had fewer than 1,000 people. Examine characteristics of individual city population trends and compare cities in states, regions and peer groups using the interactive table in this related section. See three related static tables below showing characteristics the 15 largest cities. Use the U.S. by cities shapefile with your GIS projects. See related GIS & mapping details. See more about the sources and uses of these data in this related section.

Mapping America’s 15 Largest Cities
The following view shows cities with 2017 population of 874,000 or more in blue. Labels show rank among all cities based on 2017 population. These 15 cities have a total 2017 population of 30.6 million of the 205 million total population in all U.S. cities (15%). Click graphic for larger view; expand window to full screen.
… click links in Table 3 below to view maps of these cities.

– View developed using the CV XE GIS software.

Patterns of City Percent Change in Population 2010-17
— Cities in the Los Angeles Area
The following view shows thematic patterns of population percent change, 2010-17 for cities in the Los Angeles, CA area. See color/interval assignment in legend. Click graphic for larger view; expand window to full screen. Larger view shows city names and 2017 population.

– View developed using the CV XE GIS software.
– Flexibly create your own views using the cities GIS project.
– Examine city population trends, patterns; zoom to desired areas; label as needed; integrate other data.

Tables Showing the Largest 15 cities
Data/characteristics shown in the following static tables may also be viewed in the interactive table above with more flexibility and details.

Table 1. 15 Cities With the Largest Numeric Increase, 7/1/16-7/1/17
.. cities with populations of 50,000 or more in 2016

Table 2. 15 Fastest-Growing Large Cities, 7/1/16-7/1/17
.. having populations of 50,000 or more in 2016

Table 3. 15 Most Populous Cities as of July 1, 2017
These 15 cities have a total 2017 population of 30.6 million of the 205 million total population in all U.S. cities (15%).

Mapping & GeoSpatial Analysis of the Largest 15 Cities
Click link in the list below to view map of city shown in the above table.
1 New York
2 Los Angeles
3 Chicago
4 Houston
5 Phoenix
6 Philadelphia
7 San Antonio
8 San Diego
9 Dallas
10 San Jose
11 Austin
12 Jacksonville
13 San Francisco
14 Columbus
15 Fort Worth

City/Place Demographics in Context & Related Data
• State & Regional Demographic-Economic Characteristics & Patterns
.. individual state sections with analytical tools & data access to block level
• Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook
.. continuously updated characteristics, patterns & trends for each/all metros
• ACS 2016 5-year estimates
.. related City/Place Demographic-Economic Interactive Tables
.. General Demographics … Social … Economic … Housing Characteristics
• Corresponding U.S. by County 2010-2017 Estimates

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Web Session, every Tuesday, where we review access to and use of data, tools and methods relating to GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning. We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Redistricting & Census 2020

.. most states will not have new redistricting plans until after Census 2020. Redistricting is the process of developing a redistricting plan for 2 or more areas (districts) disjoint and contiguous that are contained within the collective area of all districts based on some criteria. Redistricting is perhaps most familiar with regard to congressional districts and state legislative districts based on a set of demographic characteristics … but may apply to many other types of geographies. This post briefly reviews the Census 2020 & Redistricting Program.

Redrawing the Pennsylvania 115th Congressional Districts
The following views show Pennsylvania 115th Congressional Districts in their gerrymandered configuration (old) and the redrawn configuration (February 2018, new). Counties shown with light gray boundary. Click graphic for larger view. Expand browser window for best quality view.
Pennsylvania 115th CDs — Old

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Pennsylvania 115th CDs — New, redrawn February 2018

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Census 2020 & Redistricting Program
The ProximityOne Census 2020 & Redistricting Program enables participants to engage now in preparation for redistricting based on Census 2020. Use resources and processes provided by ProximityOne and the Congressional Districts/State Legislative Districts Group (CDSLD) .. participate in hands-on redistricting for your areas of interest. We start now using Census 2010 redistricting data, current congressional districts and state legislative districts, and related data/tools. Progressively, we move toward accessing the live Census 2020 redistricting data (March 2021). There is no cost to participate. See more about the Census 2020 & Redistricting Program at http://proximityone.com/cen2020_redistricting.htm. Join the CDSLD Group via this form to receive updates on the program and begin participation.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Web Session, every Tuesday, where we review access to and use of data, tools and methods relating to the Census 2020 redistricting Program. We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining America’s Cities: Demographic-Economic Updates

.. of the approximate 29,500 U.S. cities and places — geographic areas of population concentration — 301 had an ACS 2016 5-year estimated population of 100,000 or more. The median household income among these places, one measure of economic prosperity, ranged from $26,249 (Detroit, MI) to $117,642 (Frisco, TX).

What are the demographic-economic characteristics of your cities/places of interest? How do these compare to peer groups or a metro/state of interest. Learn more using the new city/place demographic interactive tables. Its about more than economic prosperity — using these data provide otherwise unknowable attributes about the demographic, social, economic and housing characteristics of individual cities/places.

Visual Analysis of City/Place Population Dynamics
The following view shows patterns of population percent change by city in the Charlotte, NC/SC metro area.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… more about above view in City/Place Economic Characteristics section.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity ($MHI) by City/Place
— Northern Virginia, DC, Maryland; part of the Washington, DC metro.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click graphic for larger view with places labeled by name and $MHI.

Interactive Tables — new January 2018
Use these interactive tables to get answers, build insights:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics
• Economic Characteristics — used to develop data at top of section
• Housing Characteristics
Related:
• City/Place GeoDemographics Main Section
• Annual City/Place Population Estimates & Trends
• Similar ACS tables: Census Tracts | ZIP Codes | State, Metro & County

More About City/Place GeoStatistical Data and Data Analytics
The term “places” as used here refers to incorporated places and Census Designated Places (CDPs). Incorporated places are political areas having certain governmental powers designated by the corresponding state. Unincorporated places, or Census Designated Places (CDPs), are statistical areas having no official standing and no governmental powers but are recognized as being areas of population concentration. Wide-ranging demographic-economic estimates are developed annually for the approximate 29,500 incorporated cities and CDPs based on the American Community Survey 5-year estimates. See more about the ACS 2016 5-year estimates.

Many cities have planning and data development operations that develop important local data including tax parcel data, building permit data, transportation and infrastructure data … bit generally not the data reviewed in this section. Many cities have no planning department to develop, organize and analyze geographic, demographic, economic data … making these data even more essential.

Increasingly in core sections of metropolitan areas, as shown in the above graphics, a large number of cities/places are contiguous. Many retain their own character evolving over many years. Having the detailed ACS demographic-economic data makes it possible to compare places side by side. Use the same data for related drill down geography such as census tracts and block groups to examine neighborhoods and market areas.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

TractWatch — Examining Small Area Change

Understanding the demographic-economic landscape for small area geography and how it is changing is vital for many stakeholders. Businesses and other organizations need to know how their market/service areas are changing … getting answers to questions like knowing about recent trends, where we are now and the how/where/how much things might change in the future.

Examining Tract Change
The following view shows census tracts (black boundary) located in the northeast Houston, TX area. Tracts are labeled with 2017 population estimates and percent population change from 2010 to 2017. Tract geography and characteristics are shown in context of three cities/places — Houston (orange cross-hatch), Humble (blue) and Atascocita CDP (green). It is easy to see what census tracts intersect with what cities and where. The pointer/hand is located in census tract 48-201-240902, partly intersecting with Humble city. The tract 2017 population of 12,984 reflects an increase of 10.4% since 2010. The dark brown bold boundary at the top of this tract is the Harris County, TX boundary.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. create views like this for any area in the U.S.; add your own data.

TractWatch tells us which tracts in a region of interest changed during the past year based on quarterly observable data with only a one quarter lag.

Census Tracts & TractWatch
TractWatch is a new tool/service focused on examining recent demographic-business change for each census tract. These approximate 74,000 geographic areas cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and averaged 4,000 population as of Census 2010. Tracts have a generally stable geography between decennial censuses and are coterminous with county boundaries. Tracts cover the U.S. with more than a 2-to-1 ratio compared to ZIP code areas (see tract-ZIP relationship table).

Integrated with Situation & Outlook
TractWatch insights are developed through the use of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook (S&O) database and information system — a part of S&O demographic-economic estimates and projections developed and updated annually. The 2017 vintage tract estimates and projections (annual data) cover the period 2010 through 2022 (5-year projection).

TractWatch – Monitoring Change
As a part of the S&O annual estimates and projections development, a range of measures are updated quarterly at the census tract level. Quarterly data are developed that include population, housing units, vacant units, households and business establishments.

There is only a one-quarter lag in the availability of observable census tract data. For example, observable 2017Q1 data can be added to the S&O database in July 2017. Data are analyzed and converted into a TractWatch national dataset.

Situation & Outlook Reports
The Situation & Outlook Reports (S&O Reports) are updated weekly, for the U.S. and each county, metro and state. TractWatch is a part of the “Recent Change and Outlook” S&O Report section and updated quarterly. See schedule of updates the shows when TractWatch is updated.

The S&O Reports (metro and county) Recent Change and Outlook section includes a list of census tracts which have shown significant change over the past year for that geography. A table of typically 10-to-25 key tracts are listed in a table with selected demographic-business change attributes.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining Appalachia City Characteristics & Trends

.. using tools and data to examine geographic, demographic, economic characteristics of the Appalachia Region .. Appalachia is a region that includes parts of 13 states, 420 counties, and has long been challenged with poverty. This section is part of a series focused on Appalachia.  See related more detailed Web section.

The Appalachia Region; Lay of the Land
The population of Appalachia increased from 25.1 million in 2010 to 25.5 million in 2016, an increase of 289,806. The following graphic shows how Appalachia region counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2016. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Cities in Appalachia
In 2016, there were 2,393 cities in Appalachia. Seven cities had population over 100,000; 16 cities had over 50,000 population and 213 cities had 10,000 or more population.

The following graphic shows cities (red markers) with 2016 population of 10,000 or more in the Appalachia region in context of counties (yellow fill pattern). Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view. Larger view shows city names except where labels could overlap.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Growing Cities
The following view shows cities as green markers having 5,000+ 2016 population with growth of 500+ or more population, 2010-2016.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Cities & Metros in Appalachia
The following graphic shows Metropolitan Statistical Areas (green fill pattern) that intersect with Appalachia region counties. Note that some metros only partly intersect with Appalachia. County boundaries are shown as overlay on metros. For example, only northern counties of the Atlanta metro (see pointer) are Appalachia counties. “Edge” Appalachia metros create opportunities for nearby Appalachia counties. Cities within Appalachia and having 50,000+ 2016 population are shown with orange markers. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Characteristics of Metros, Cities and School Districts
• Demographic-economic profiles for selected cities
Examples (click link above to view other cities; click links below for specific city profiles):
.. Cumberland, MD [2421325] (19,978)
.. Frostburg, MD [2430900] (8,676)
Access any/all U.S. city(s) — http://proximityone.com/places15dp1.htm
• Demographic-economic profiles for selected school districts
Examples (click link above to view other districts; click links below for specific district profiles):
.. Allegany County Public Schools, MD [2400030]
.. Pittsburgh School District, PA [4219170]
Access any/all U.S. school district(s) — http://proximityone.com/sd15dp1.htm
• S&O metro reports

Examining Characteristics of All Cities/Places
Use these resources to examine all U.S. cities/places.
• Cities/Places Main Section
• America’s Communities Program — city profiles
• All Cities/Places — 4 Web section/tables
• City Population Estimates & Trends 2010-2016 interactive table

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.