Category Archives: Census Blocks

National Children & Education Statistics Program Updates

.. NCES Program updates .. tools, data & methodology to examine national scope children & education .. school, school district & extended geographic-statistical data with drill-down to school and intersection level. See more about the NCES Program below.

New this Week
ACS 2015 school district demographic-economic interactive tables
– view, compare, analyze selected/all U.S. school districts
– more focused blog updates coming soon.

School Districts with Highest Median Household Income
Use the interactive table to examine economic characteristics of school districts. Below is a list of the 10 school districts having the highest median household income developed using the Economic Characteristics interactive table. Develop similar views for metros and states of interest.

– ranked on item E062 — median household income.
– click graphic for larger view.

Use GIS tools to develop thematic pattern maps such as the one shown below with NCES GIS projects. Select from hundreds of statistical measures. Create your own regional;/district views. Integrate other data.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by School District
– median household income (item E062 in table)

– view developed with CVGIS software & related GIS project and data.
– click graphic for larger view.

See the School Districts Economic Characteristics Interactive Table.

About the National Children & Education Statistics Program
The National Children & Education Statistics (NCES) Program provides access to tools, data & methodology to examine national scope children’s demographics & education-related characteristics. These resources enable stakeholders to view and analyze detailed geographic and statistical data at the school, neighborhood, community, attendance zone, school district and higher level geography. Integrate these data with drill-down demographic-economic data to the census block and intersection levels. Examine characteristics of schools, school districts and education data with related and higher level geography including urban/rural, cities, counties, metros, state and the U.S.

See NCES Main Section.

Contents: Summary of NCES Program Resources
Click a link to view more detail on a selected topic.
Updates: New Resources, Events & Related Topics
Analytics, Blogs, Studies
Using Software Tools & Datasets
01 Mapping & Visual Analysis Tools
02 School District Annual Demographic-Economic Data Resources
03 Children’s Demographics & Living Environment by School District
04 School District Enrollment & Operational Characteristics
05 School District Finances: Sources & Uses of Funds
06 School District Geographic Size & Characteristics
07 School District-ZIP Code Area Relationship Table
08 K-12 Public Schools
09 K-12 Private Schools
10 K-12 Public School Attendance Zones
11 K-12 Public Schools by Urban/Rural Status
12 Census Tract Demographic-Economic Characteristics
13 Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook Reports

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Crime Data Analytics

Goto ProximityOne .. examining crime incidence and socioeconomic patterns and analyzing small-area and location-based data.

.. what are the crime patterns in neighborhoods or areas of interest? It is challenging to get useful answers to this type of question. Crime incidence data by location/address are often difficult or not possible to obtain. Even where the location-based crime data are available, the data must be geocoded, e.g., assigned a census block code to each address. Separately demographic-economic must be organized to examine contextually with the crime data.

Integrating Crimes by Location & Patterns of Economic Prosperity
– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Crime Data Analytics. Use the Crime Incidence and Socioeconomic Patterns GIS project and associated datasets to explore relationships between crime and small area demographic-economic characteristics. Follow the steps described below to study patterns and relationships in Kansas City and/or use this framework to develop similar data analytics for other areas.

Framework for a case study. 409 of Missouri’s 4,506 block groups are within the jurisdiction of the Kansas City police department (KCPD) and had one or more crimes in 2014 (latest fully reported year). There were approximately 10,400 crimes recorded by the KCPD in 2014, in the city area spanning four counties. In this section tools and data are used to examine crime patterns in Kansas City, MO. Crime data are included as markers/locations in a GIS project. Crime data are also aggregated to the census block level and examined as summary data (aggregate crimes by census block). Crime data are related to American Community Survey (ACS) 2014 5-year demographic-economic data at the block group geographic level.

To perform these types of analyses, it is important to start with location-based crime data that have been attributed with type of offense (offense code). Ideally, each crime incidence data record includes minimally the offense code and address of the crime. Such location-based crime incidence data have been acquired from the KCPD. These data are used to develop a shapefile that can be included in a GIS project.

Patterns of Crime Incidence in Kansas City, MO
The following graphic shows patterns of crime incidence by census block for the “Plaza Area” within Kansas city. This view shows all types of crimes aggregated to the census block level. Crimes committed where a handgun was involved are shown as black/red circular markers. Click the graphic for a larger view that shows legend and more detail.
– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Related views (click link to view graphic in new window):
Use the GIS project to develop variations of these views. Optionally add your own data.
Lay of the land: Kansas City city (cross hatched) in context of metro
All crimes as markers in Kansas City in 2014

Patterns of Economic Prosperity & Crime Incidence
The following graphic shows patterns of economic prosperity (median household income $MHI) by block group for the same general area as above. This view illustrates how two types of crimes (burglary blue triangle markers and homicide (red/black square markers) can be examined in context. Click the graphic for a larger view that shows legend and more detail.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Related views (click link to view graphic in new window):
Use the GIS project to develop variations of these views.
View similar to above, without $MHI layer

Data used to analyze patterns of economic prosperity/$MHI are based on the American Community Survey (ACS) 2014 5-year estimates at the block group geographic level. The same scope of subject matter is available for higher level geography. The GIS project/datasets includes many types of demographic-economic subject matter that can be used to display/analyze different socioeconomic patterns.

Using Block Group Geography/Data
Census Block Groups sit in a “mid-range” geography between census blocks and census tracts. All cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and nest together, census blocks being the lowest common denominator for each. Block Groups (BGs) are the smallest geographic area for which annually updated ACS 5-year estimates data are tabulated.

Advantages of using BG geodemographics include the maximum degree of geographic drill-down (using ACS data) … enabling the most micro-perspective of demographics for a neighborhood or part of study area. A disadvantages of using BG estimates is that typically the smaller area estimates have a relatively higher error of estimate.

Crime Incidence and Socioeconomic Patterns GIS Project/Datasets
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… omit this step if CV XE GIS software already installed.
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the CISP GIS Project fileset
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now)
… unzip CISP GIS project files to local folder c:\crime
3. Open the kcmo_crimes_2014.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named C:\crime\kcmo_crimes_2014.gis
4. Done .. the start-up view shows the crime patterns.

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing location-based data and block group demographics and integrating those data into analytical applications.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Mapping Statistical Data

.. GIS tools & data resources that you can use for statistical mapping & visual data analysis … Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide flexible and powerful capabilities to combine maps with data. In our increasingly data rich environment, we often experience “drowning in data.” GIS tools can help harness disparate and voluminous data and assist with data linkage. This section provides links to other sections that provide information on no cost GIS software and “production” GIS projects and datasets that you can use.

Patterns of Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-14 by County
— relative to U.S. PCPI 2008-14 change
To illustrate, the following graphic shows patterns of per capita personal income change 2008 to 2014 by county relative to the U.S. See more information. Click graphic for larger view with legend and additional details. Make variations of this map view using resources described in this section. Optionally integrate your own data.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated REIS GIS Project

GIS provides us with a way to improve collaboration; we can more easily comprehend and understand geographic relationships and patterns among “variables” and statistical data. As we reduce tabular data to visual representations, we are better able to communicate “what the data are telling us” among stakeholders and teams/committees. This second dimension, learning what the data are telling us, provides the power of creating insights for more effective decision-making.

Mapping Statistical Data Topics
Most applications presented in this section involve use of Windows-based desktop GIS software. The software and GIS project files and datasets are installed on your computer. These resources are available for use by members of the User Group at no fee.  Click a link below to view additional details about a topic of interest.  There you find a description of the scope and use of the data/geography, steps to access and use the GIS projects/datasets and getting started tutorials.
World by Country
U.S. by State
U.S. by Congressional District
U.S. by Metropolitan Area
U.S. by County
U.S. by City/Place
U.S. by ZIP Code Area
State by Census Tract (each/all states)
State by Block Group
State by Census Block
K-12 Schools & School District Data Analytics

Applications make use of a range of statistical data from the Federal Statistical System, and other sources, integrated with shapefiles from the Census Bureau TIGER/Line shapefiles, OpenStreetMaps, and other sources.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss accessing, integrating and using these resources … and linking these data/geography with other data that relate to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Neighborhood Analysis: Block & Block Group Demographics

.. steps to analyze NYC Chelsea area demographics that can be applied to any neighborhood … demographic characteristics of the Chelsea area in New York City, an area west of Avenue of the Americas between 14th and 34th Streets, is radically different from adjacent areas. This topic was covered in a “great wealth divide” New York Times story. This section reviews how census block and block group demographic-economic data can be used to examine these patterns. A GIS project is used that associates census block and block group data for visual analysis Methods summarized here can be applied to any area. Use the tools described in this section to obtain demographic-economic profiles for any neighborhood based on an address. See related Web page for more detail.

See related post on Most Populated New York City Census Blocks.

Study Area in Context of Broader Area
The study area, a group of selected census tracts, is shown as the red cross-hatched area in context of lower Manhattan in the view below.

  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

Zoom-in View of Study Area
The next view shows a zoom-in to the study area. Block groups are shown with a red boundary. Chelsea Park is visible as the green area above the pointer south of 29th street.

  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

Census Block Demographics in Context of Block Groups
The next view shows a further zoom-in showing census blocks with black boundary and block groups with red boundary. Census blocka are shown with a semi-transparent yellow fill pattern (population greater than 4) and gray fill pattern (blocks with population less than 5). The block group containing Chelsea Park (green area above pointer) contains three census blocks, 2 with no population and one with 1,010 population. Block data are from Census 2010; there are no post-Census 2010 block level demographics available. The analysis could be extended to shown wide-ranging demographics at the block level.

  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

Examining Socioeconomic Attributes
In this further zoom-in, Chelsea Park (green area) is shown near the pointer. Census block population labels are turned off for blocks with 5 or more population to help show a less cluttered view. Block groups are labeled with two values. The yellow upper label shows the median housing value (MHV). The green lower label shows median household income (MHI). Both data items are based on the American Community Survey 5-year estimates (ACS 2013) are centric to 2011. The ACS data are updated annually; as of October 2015, the latest data are from ACS 2013; the ACS 2014 data become available December 2015. The ACS 2013 5 year estimates are top-coded at $1,000,001 for MHV and $250,001 for $MHI.


  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

The block group containing Chelsea Park has a median household income of $26,440; the median housing value estimate is not available (too few owner-occupied units to develop MHV estimate). The Chelsea Park block group code is “360610097002” — this code uniquely identifies this block group among all other block groups in the U.S.

The block group immediately to the south of the Chelsea Park block group median household income of $21,750; the median housing value estimate is $1,000,001 (top-coded). The code for this block group code is “360610093006”.

While the MHI for BG 360610093006 might seem like it should be higher, a look at the number of households by income interval explains this number. Almost half of the households in the BG have a household income below $20,000. Analytical options that might be considered include using mean household income or mean family income instead of median.

Compare number of households by household income intervals for these two block groups.

Compare Your Block Group of Interest to Chelsea Park BG
Compare the above BG attributes to any BG of interest:
1. Copy and paste this string into text editor (eg, Notepad) window (do not press enter after paste):
http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/13_5YR/B19001/1500000USXXXXXXXXXXX|1500000US360610097002

2. Click here, key in an address then click Find to locate the 11 character BG code.
— scroll down to “2010 Census Blocks” and then further to “GEOID”
— copy the first 11 digits of the GEOID value to clipboard see illustrative graphic.

3. Paste those 11 characters into the URL, replacing the “XXXXXXXXXXXX”; this modification must be exact.

4. Press Enter. A profile appears comparing your BG to the Chelsea Park BG 360610097002.

Data Analytics Lab Session
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session. There is no fee. Discuss how tools and methods reviewed in this section can be applied to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Researcher & Story Development Tools & Resources

Innovative and results-oriented story writing often requires geographic, demographic, economic and related data. Research results and stories must increasingly use graphics and visual renderings of data  to be effective, retain reader attention and be responsive to needs. A picture is worth a thousand words. In our expanding everything-integrated world, stories must draw on a range of authoritative data resources that can be knit-together.

Journalists and authors require easy and access to these data in a consumable form. Researchers and students share these needs. Grant writers benefit by including relevant data in proposals and well as unique maps and graphics. Economists and analysts creating interpretative summaries of statistical data releases (“how does this impact us?”) require related data and tools to effectively communicate conclusions and inferences.

This section reviews access to a few of these tools and resources that are available to researchers and story writers — as well as tools to map and otherwise visualize these data. These resources offer the customization or specific detail often not available to meet specific needs. Most of the resources reviewed here are available at no fee. Some resources are available only to ProximityOne User Groupmembers. Join the User Group now. See terms of use. See related Web section.

Navigating the Federal Statistical Resources
… topics below include these and a broader set of resources.
http://proximityone.com/fss.htm

Interactive Geographic-Demographic-Economic Tables
… view, query, rank, compare attributes for many types of geography.
http://proximityone.com/rankingtables.htm

Interactive Location-Based Demographic-Economic Data Tool
… key in address, immediate display of ACS demographic-economic data.
… block group, tract, place, county, state data; latitude-longitude, geocodes.
http://proximityone.com/location_based_demographics.htm

Custom Mapping Tools (Windows software tool)
… create custom maps for proposed service areas.
CV XE GIS

Address Code Your Data (Windows software tool)
… show your address/location data on maps.
http://proximityone.com/apigeocoder.htm

Chart Graphics; Population Pyramids (Windows software tool)
… age-cohort chart graphics for your county or school district.
http://proximityone.com/chartgraphics.htm

Demographic-Economic Data Extraction Tool (Windows software tool)
… use this API-tool to extract your selected subject matter data.
… census block, block group, other geographic levels
… Census 2000, Census 2010, ACS 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
… create your own files for use with Excel/other software.
http://proximityone.com/dede.htm

Custom maps can enhance your proposal; make custom map graphics:

Make Custom Congressional District Maps
… create custom maps for individual or custom grouped congressional districts.
… CD 113 and CD 114 boundaries are the same, based on maps submitted by states to the Census Bureau.
http://proximityone.com/cd113_maps.htm

Make Custom City Maps
… create custom maps for cities of interest; examine in context of other geography.
http://proximityone.com/citymaps.htm

Make Custom Metro Maps
… create custom maps for metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas.
http://proximityone.com/metromaps.htm

Make Custom Neighborhood Maps
… create thematic/pattern maps; access related demographic-economic data by neighborhood.
http://proximityone.com/neighborhood_patterns.htm

Make Custom Block Group Maps
… create custom maps for small, sub-neighborhood areas.
http://proximityone.com/mapping_bg.htm

Make Custom Census Block Maps
… create custom maps for areas by census block – smallest geographic area with detailed demographics.
http://proximityone.com/mapping_census_blocks.htm

America’s Communities Program
… demographic-economic profiles for individual cities.
http://proximityone.com/acp.htm

School District Community Profiles
… demographic-economic multi-part profiles for individual school districts.
http://proximityone.com/sddep.htm

School District Characteristics
http://proximityone.com/sddmi.htm

K-12 Public Schools Characteristics – individual and all schools
http://proximityone.com/k12publicschools.htm

K-12 Private Schools Characteristics – individual and all schools
http://proximityone.com/k12privatecchools.htm

Charter Schools Characteristics & Patterns – individual and all schools
http://proximityone.com/sch1314_charter.htm

County Population Trends; Annual Projections to 2020 by Age Group
… population trends profiles for individual counties … how is school age population changing? 65 & over?
http://proximityone.com/outlook2020.htm
most recent county official estimates – click link in table
county trend profile – example for Cook County, IL; all counties available

Metropolitan Area Characteristics
… geographic & demographic composition profiles for individual metros.
Current Vintage Metropolitan Areas
2015 Updates: New and Modified Metros
Metropolitan Area Median Income and Housing Value: 2013-14

State Legislative District Characteristics
… geographic & demographic composition profiles for individual state legislative districts.
http://proximityone.com/sld2013.htm

Congressional District Characteristics
… geographic & demographic composition profiles for individual congressional districts.
http://proximityone.com/cd113.htm
114th Congressional Districts: Median Income and Housing Value: 2013-14

Census Tract Demographic-Economic Patterns
Main Census Tracts section interactive tables includes all tracts:
General Demographics | Social Characteristics | Economic Characteristics | Housing Characteristics

ZIP Code Demographic-Economic Patterns
Main ZIP Code section … interactive tables include all ZIP code areas:
General Demographics | Social Characteristics | Economic Characteristics | Housing Characteristics

More about ProximityOne Demographic-Economic Projections
Outlook 2020 | Outlook 2030 | Outlook 2060 | Quarterly 3 year
• integrated multi-sourced Situation & Outlook demographic-economic data

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Business Data Analytics: Methods & Tools

Business Data Analytics can help most any business more effectively reach goals and objectives. Whether a new or established business, serving a county or national market, similar tools and methods apply. See related Web version for more details.

• How can you examine patterns/characteristics of existing customers?
• Where are prospective customers and possible unknown opportunities?
• How do you best define your market area?
  – what geographies have the largest number of prospects?
• What are the sales potential in this market area?
  – what are the best measures to examine sales potential?
• What is your competitive position?
  – how many other establishments offer a similar service in your market area?
• How can your sales data identify geographic areas of opportunity?

Tools and methods described here can help answer these questions and facilitate strategic planning. Here are key steps to using Business Data Analytics in your business. These applications make use of a GIS project and data for a business located in the San Diego area. Click link to view graphics.
Business locations
Territories served
Market characteristics
Urban population by block; population by tract
Customer locations
Prospect locations
Competitor locations
Composite of above
Related topics

Locations [goto top]
Where are the business locations/stores/operations
Blue triangle markers show existing locations. Are these the ideal locations?

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Territories Served [goto top]
What territories do locations serve? Are they developed correctly?
Territories for service/market areas are shown as color-shaded areas.
— flexibly re-define territories

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Market Characteristics [goto top]
What are the market characteristics?
Graphic shows patterns of median household income (MHI) by census tract;
— identifying areas with best opportunity
— examine wide-ranging demographic-economic characteristics
— market area tracts shown with cross-hatch pattern
— MHI intervsls/color correspondence shown in legend at left of map
— ranges can be customized/shifted to suit

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Urban Population by Block; Population by Tract [goto top]
Urban census blocks are shown with an orange fill pattern.
– examine scope of urban areas and how they relate to business development.
Census tract population is shown as a label for all tracts.
– identify population concentrations/attributes for small areas.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Customers [goto top]
Red markers show existing customers.
— linked to customer/product database

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Prospects [goto top]
Orange and green markers show prospects based on different sources/criteria.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Competitors [goto top]
What is the competitive position/where are competitors located?
Red triangle markers show where competitors are located.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Composite View [goto top]
Integrating business operating environment.
Graphic shows zoom-in to Encinatas location with all features shown separately in above views.
Roads/streets have been added; optionally use for routing and locational analysis.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated Business Patterns GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Related Topics for Extended Analysis [goto top]
These extended topics make use of the data and analyses reviewed above. These topics will be covered in subsequent sections.

• Determining performance relative to the market characteristics
• Assessing impact of external and internal factors affecting operations
  – supply chain, labor force, costs, demand …
• Examining financial situation and outlook?
• Determining areas of missed opportunity
  – metros, hot spots within metros (tracts)
• Using collective data in models for predictive analyses
  – how might things change, when where and how?
• How to interpret statistical releases
  – determining which relevant, assessing implications for impact
• How to most effectively make team/collaborative/management decisions

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.