Monthly Archives: March 2014

Future of China: Trends & Age-Cohort Analysis

The population of China is projected to change from 1.33 billion in 2010 to 1.30 billion in 2050. How will China age-cohort patterns in 2010 compare to those projected for 2050? How do these patterns compare with those of the United States?

This section illustrates use of population pyramids to examine age by gender demographic patterns for China as of 2010 and 2050. Similar population pyramids can be developed for any country.  Population pyramids help us visualize and more easily understand age-gender structure — and how it is changing over time.

China by Province ..  click graphic for larger view

view developed with CV XE GIS.

A top-heavy pyramid suggests negative population growth that might be due to many factors, including high death rates, low birthrates and increased emigration. A bottom-heavy pyramid suggests high birthrates, falling or stable death rates and potential for rapid population growth.

The population pyramid shows a male population bar chart (left side of pyramid, blue) symmetrically with a female population bar chart (right side of pyramid, light red). Each bar shows the population by 5-year age group, 0-4 years to 80-84 years and 85 years and over.

China, Total Population, 2010 Click graphic to view as HTML.

China, Total Population, 2050 Click graphic to view as HTML.

More About China Demographics; Examining Other Countries
Use the ChartGraphics tools to get answers to these types of questions and gain insights world by country age-cohort patterns over time … into the future. Population pyramids developed using ChartGraphics provide an easy-to-develop and consume visual analysis of these patterns.

ChartGraphics is available at no fee to ProximityOne User Group members. Join now, there is no fee.

Using Age-Cohort Analysis Tools
Learn more about using age-cohort patterns and analysis. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Fastest Growing Metros & Counties

Examining how and where the U.S. is changing … the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX Metro had the largest population growth from 2012 to 2013 among all metros. The Houston metro Harris County had the largest population growth among all counties for the same period. These data are based on the latest official population estimates and components of change data released by the Census Bureau in March 2014.

Use data access tools described in this section to examine patterns and characteristics of demographic change by county and metro for the U.S. Use the interactive tools to flexibly examine counties, metros and metros by county. Examine annual change in population by component of population change (births, deaths, domestic migration and international migration). View metros of interest by county components and how each county contributes to the make-up and change for specific metros.

Visual Analysis using GIS Resources
Examine patterns and trends using Geographic Information System (GIS) resources. Download the GIS project with ready-to-use analytical views; add your data and modify views to meet specific subject matter and geographic interests. These GIS resources are available to members of the ProximityOne User GroupJoin now, there is no fee.

Population Percent Change by County, 2010-2013
CTYPOP2013 GIS project start-up view.

Click graphic for larger view and details.

Net Migration by County, 2013
CTYPOP2013TX GIS project start-up view; illustrates visual analysis of net migration by county for 2013 (mid-2012-mid-2013); uses same project files as CTYPOP2013; only query and zoom settings differ.

Click graphic for larger view and details.

Interactive Table
Use the interactive table (separate Web section) to examine counties, metros and metros by county. Examine annual change in population by component of population change (births, deaths, domestic migration and international migration). The next two graphics are screenshots of the table. Develop your own similar rankings for states of interest (use filter selection below table).

Top 10 Metros Ranked on Population Growth 2012-2013
Ranked in descending order on far right column in graphic.

Click graphic for larger view and details.

Top 10 Counties Ranked on Population Growth 2012-2013
Ranked in descending order on far right column in graphic.

Click graphic for larger view and details.

To view states and regions of interest, use the interactive table. The table contains a row/record for each county and metro. As each row contains the metro code, you can query on a metro code of interest to see how component counties compare. Use the filter operations below the table to select one state, one metro, all counties, or all metros. Each row provides annual data 2010 through 2013 for the population, components of change and several rate measures.

Support & DMI Web Sessions
Learn more about using resources described in this section. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants. We can address your specific questions about using metro and county demographic economic data and related applications.

 

Population Pyramids & Age Cohort Analysis

Patterns and trends of population composition by county and region are important to planning and decision-making.  By knowing more about the prospective changing demand for products and services, in both the private and public sector, operations are more likely to be successful is one of the more important methods of examining the patterns and trends.  How has the size of the population in a certain age group by gender by race-origin changed over time?  How might it change into the future? This section reviews use population pyramids to examine patterns and trends (2000 to 2010) of the Asian Indian population by county.  You can use tools described below to examine race-origin population pyramids for any county or state; described in more detail below.  See the Web version of this post for more details.

Visual Analysis & Population Pyramids
The graphics below illustrate how population pyramids, and related tables, can be used to explore characteristics of the Asian Indian population. One graphic shows Census 2000 data, the second graphic shows Census 2010 data.
Census 2000 U.S. Asian Indian alone population …

Click graphic to view as HTML.

Census 2010 U.S. Asian Indian alone population …

Click graphic to view as HTML.

Gaining Insights
The population pyramid helps us understand the age and gender structure of a population in a specific area, like a county or state. The shape of the pyramid can show the potential for future growth and provide hints about past trends. A top-heavy pyramid suggests negative population growth that might be due to many factors, including high death rates, low birthrates and increased emigration. A bottom-heavy pyramid suggests high birthrates, falling or stable death rates and potential for rapid population growth.

The population pyramid shows a male population bar chart (left side of pyramid, blue) symmetrically with a female population bar chart (right side of pyramid, light red). Each bar shows the population by 5-year age group, 0-4 years to 80-84 years and 85 years and over.

We can use the Census 2010 Summary File 2 Demographic Profile 1 (http://www.proximityone.com/cen2010_sf2.htm) interactive ranking table to determine that Santa Clara County, CA has the largest Asian Indian alone population based on Census 2010. The geographic summary level is set to county, the Race Group is set to Asian Indian alone, and the header column D001 (total population) is clicked to determine that Santa Clara County has an Asian Indian alone population of 117,596. In these examples, the bar maximum population value has been set to 10,000 (can be set to any value) making it easier to compare the distributions between 2000 and 2010.

Census 2000 Santa Clara County, CA Asian Indian alone population …

Click graphic to view as HTML.

Census 2010 Santa Clara County, CA Asian Indian alone population …

Click graphic to view as HTML.

Start Exploring Now!
Use the no fee ChartGraphics software with ready-to-use U.S. national scope U.S., state and county data to create your own population pyramids like those reviewed here. The following view shows the ChartGraphics user interface when used to display the data for Santa Clara County. An optional setting enables the user to publish the population pyramid and associated age-gender population by age table as shown in the above graphics. The resulting published data is in HTML structure and ready to integrate into your documents. As shown in this view, you can easily select the year, race group and geographic area of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about age-cohort analysis, development and use of population pyramids and use of data analytics related to your interests.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Geocoding Address Data; Using Geocoded Data

… determine the census block, census tract and other geographies for most any U.S. street address, and its demographic-economic characteristics, using the no fee APIGeocoder.  Geocoding is a key element in many decision-making information applications.  Geocoding is the process of converting address-oriented data into a structure that enables showing those addresses as markers on a map. The graphic presented below illustrates how an address (7500 Mission Rd, Shawnee Mission, KS 66208) can be shown as a marker (see pointer) in context of roads and other geography. This address is located in a block group area with median household income of $46,372 and median housing value of $168,800 as determined by APIGeocoder. See in third graphic below. This section provides an overview of the APIGeocoder, a Windows-based software tool that can be used to geocode addresses … and optionally much more.

Address/Location in Context of Related Geography

See related drill-down view.

Geocoding and geocoding results are much more than converting addresses into a structure for map display … they enable far-reaching location, routing and pattern analysis. Entering one address at a time can be useful in some situations. But generally, there is an interest in geocoding hundreds to many thousands of addresses — and saving the geocoded results for reuse. An association might geocode its members; a business its customers; a school district its schools, teachers, mentors, students; a healthcare practitioner its clients. Additional codes then enable the data to be viewed in a map to examine patterns. Answering questions … where do certain types/markers cluster? What areas seem to have voids/no activity? What are prospective problem spots? How are the addresses, as a set, changing over time? How do this years patterns compare to last years? What is trending?

APIGeocoder
The APIGeocoder is a tool that you can use to address code your address-oriented data. APIGeocoder uses API technology to determine, and then assign, latitude-longitude values to the address. APIGeocoder also determines and assigns other codes useful for Geographic Information System (GIS) applications. APIGeocoder is a companion tool for use with the CV XE GIS software.  More generally, APIGeocoder can be used to develop geocoded data with any GIS software.

Start-up View of APIGeocoder
The following graphic shows an address in the left group box. 

Geocode Results
Clicking the CodeOne (see pointer), geocoded characteristics of this address are shown in the right group box. Scroll down to view descriptions of geocoded results.

Clicking the HTML button (top right) generates an HTML page:

Click graphic for full HTML view.

When using the BatchCode feature, the address file is updated with geocode results. View the illustrative 28 record address file (addr1.dbf) with geocoded — excel file.

Try it Yourself
Install the APIGeocoder (see below) and key in an address in the Input Address section. ID and Name are not required. Then click the “CodeOne” button to view the Geocoded Results.

APIGeocoder Installation
The no fee APIGeocoder is available to members of the ProximityOne User GroupJoin now, there is no fee.  To install on your Windows computer, click APIGeocoder Installer and follow the prompts taking all defaults.

More Information and Support
See the APIGeocoder main Web page for additional information.  Join us in a DMI Web session for APIGeocoder Q&A and participate in sessions focused on APIGeocoder.

Decision-Making Information Web Sessions

Join us in an upcoming DMI Web Session … how to improve our ability to understand where we are … and where we are going? How can we use data to better understand patterns, where and how change will occur … and how change will impact us? Have we got the best data to answer the right questions?

The one hour informal sessions are focused on selected topics regarding development, integration and use of decision-making information.  Ask your questions about DMI tools, resources and their use … whether on the focus session or otherwise. There is no fee to participate.

Some of the most important data resources are developed/made accessible through stove-piped channels. Data are often difficult to access and integrate with other data. Media, form and format of publication differ widely. Changing technology, geography and subject matter universes over time create challenges to examine what the data are telling us. Methods, tools and resources are reviewed in the these sessions to make analytical endeavors and resulting insights more effective.

Upcoming Sessions
Using API Technology: Integrating Multi-sourced Data 3/18/14
Examining the School District Community & Infrastructure 3/25/14
State Legislative District & Congressional District Demographics 4/1/14
Metropolitan Area Characteristics & Trends 4/8/14
Developing Custom Estimates using ACS Public Use Microdata Samples 4/15/14
Situation & Outlook Quarterly Briefing 4/17/14
Using TIGER/Line Shapefiles; Visual Data Analysis 4/22/14
Census Block, Block Group & Census Tract Pattern Analysis 4/29/14

See additional details about each session.

Registration
Use the registration form to register for sessions. There is no fee. Check back for new/additional sessions.

Making City Maps

Use tools and resources reviewed in this section to develop your own map(s) that show city(s) of interest. See more about using Geographic Information System (GIS) tools. The city boundary shapefile used in the cities/places GIS project described here creates city boundaries that are very precise. The GIS resources enable you to view/show the city boundaries in context with roads and other geography. Flexibly add labels. Create pattern views. Add your own data. City maps can be saved as a graphic and used in any manner. There are no fees to use resources described in this section.

Maps developed using these resources can be a valuable part of using community level demographic-economic data provided through the America’s Communities Program. Map graphics combined with tabular data amplify the potentials of these decision-making information resources.

Atlanta, GA City Boundary — create similar map view for any city

Click graphic for larger view. See more illustrative views below.

Steps to Develop City Maps
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the U.S. cities/places GIS project
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now, no fee)
… unzip U.S. Cities/Places GIS project files to local folder c:\cvxe\1\
3. Open the c:\cvxe\1\cvxe_us_places1.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named c:\cvxe\1\cvxe_us_places1.gis
4. Done. The start-up view is shown below with additional instructions.

ProximityOne User Group
A supplementary and different set of data, software and analytical resources are provided as a part of the ProximityOneUser Group. ACP participants are automatically enrolled in the User Group. Members may download and use selected resources on their own computers. Join now … there is no fee to participate.

Using the City Maps Project
While the c:\cvxe\1\cvxe_us_places1.gis is opened, the view shown below appears.
The map shows state boundaries and city/place boundaries. Optionally “click-on” the county layer shown in legend at left to show county boundaries also.

Click graphic for larger view.

Use the Find/Query feature to locate a city of interest.
Click button shown on toolbar in above view and query form appears:

Click graphic for larger view.

Fill in the form and click Find button. City of interest will appear with yellow fill pattern. The form must be showing the Places layer, the Name field, the “like” operator, and the exact case-sensitive name to be located. The name to be located shows in the example as “Atlanta%” (no quotes). The % symbol wildcards the remainder of the name. When using a frequently used/very common/ name, consider zooming in to a state and using the search setting “in visible extent” to narrow the scope of possible hits.

Atlanta is located/highlighted as shown below. The zoom and pan navigation tools are used to get the following view.

Click graphic for larger view.

Click the RevertAll button on the Find/Query form to remove the yellow fill pattern. Close the Find/Query form. Use the Layer Editor to adjust the view to the zoom-in and larger final view shown at the top of this page.

Closing the Project
If CV is closed at this time, no changes made to the project settings are saved. Reopening the project will create the same start-up view as shown above. Repeat the steps to create views for other cities.

Illustrative Views — click graphic for larger view
Austin, TX

Boston, MA

Columbia, MO

Columbus, OH

Los Angeles, CA

Mesa, AZ

Orlando, FL

Getting Help
Join us in a DMI Web session (more information) where we do illustration applications on a Q&A basis. See the schedule and join in!

See Web section that provides similar content as this post.

Community Decision-Making Information

Community decision-making information, as used here, refers to the set of geographic, demographic and economic data that can be used with tools to assess community needs and develop agendas to advance the welfare of community residents and stakeholders. The geographic hub of the community is a city or place — a place of population concentration.

There are approximately 30,000 incorporated cities or census designated places in the U.S. (about cities/places). The focus here is on those incorporated cities, ones with “city limits” and boundaries and government powers designated by the corresponding state.

The concept of the city being a “hub” remains. Geographically, a community is often broader, sometimes narrower, that its defined corporate limits. The graphic shown below shows the combined Jefferson City, MO city, school district and county. The city boundaries differ from those of the school district, a typical scenario with wide ranging variations across the U.S. Typically, residents of the school district have a sense of community centric to the associated city.

Jefferson City, Missouri

Click graphic for larger view. Counties shown with bold gray boundary (white solid label). Cities appear with green fill pattern (white label). The primary school district is shown with bold blue boundary (yellow label); other school districts have lighter blue boundary. Schools appear as red markers.

Community Decision-Making Information
While the leadership, budget, authorizations and related items differ between the school district, city and county, they share the need for a common set of decision-making information. There is a common set of geographic, demographic, and economic data needed by each entity — and neighborhoods throughout the community.

To assess needs, examine change and plan for the future requires data for several types of geography in and around the community. Frequently updated and longitudinal demographic-economic data are needed for geographies including the city, school district(s), schools, county(s), census tracts, ZIP codes, block groups, census blocks, roads and topological structures. Attributes of broader geographic areas including metropolitan areas, Public Use Microdata Areas, state legislative districts and congressional districts are also essential.

These diverse subject matter for diverse geography can often be most effectively assembled and used in a Geographic Information System (GIS).  The view shown below illustrates use of GIS resources to view the location and attributes of low and moderate income neighborhoods.

Affordable Housing; Low & Moderate Income Neighborhoods
See related document for more information.
http://

Organized Access to Key Data
The America’s Communities database and information system assembles selected key data for selected types of geography organized around individual communities. As an example, the Missouri Communities Program provides access to frequently Web-based data with ready-to-use GIS resources. These resources are made available to participating cities and counties at no fee. View the Jefferson City, MO community access Web section to examine the scope and content.

Using Community Decision-Making Information
Participants in the Missouri Community Program are automatically enrolled as members in the ProximityOne User Group — open to anyone at no fee. Join now. The combination of these resources provide a powerful base for community decision-making.

Join us in weekly decision-making information Web sessions where we cover selected data access and use topics as well as Q&A relating to use of the community-focused data profiles and resources.  View sessions  and sign-up here.