Category Archives: population components of change

Using GIS & GeoDemographics

.. join us in the GIS & GeoDemographics self-paced, online course.

Visual representation, maps, of demographic data by geographic area can be exciting and rewarding. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can bring maps alive. Creativity is boundless. The banner at the top of the corresponding Web section presents a static view of a map rendered using GIS. This map shows the Los Angeles area by census tract. For the analyst or stakeholder, it shows something more — the percent Asian citizen voting age population by tract, overlayed with Congressional District boundaries and codes. It shows relationships, patterns. Using the power of GIS, the zoom level, colors, legend, and labeling can all be changed immediately. You, the GIS user, are at once analyst, artist and storyteller. In control of your medium, canvas, you further your benefits from use these software and data by making dynamic presentations in collaborations. Make compelling arguments. Capture your views and blend them with words and charts into documents. Welcome to the world of GIS and geodemographics.

Mapping census block demographics
The graphic shown below illustrates use of GIS software with the TIGER digital map database census block shapefile to show census blocks for two Ohio counties in context of 2018 CBSAs/Metros. Clicking on a census block (see pointer) shows a mini profile for that block.


– view developed using ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Using GIS & GeoDemographics .. about the course
Examining geographic-demographic-economic characteristics, patterns and trends … researchers, policymakers, journalists, administrators, students among others. How can you most benefit from using the TIGER geographic data to meet your objectives? These data are available at no cost. Join us in the Using GIS Tools & GeoDemographics online, self-paced course. Learn all aspects of using the Census Bureau TIGER files and related Census-sourced and other Federal statistical data. Augment your professional skills; participants receive all required data, methods and tools. Your personal session is developed and coordinated by Warren Glimpse. You receive the GIS course certificate upon completion. The course may be started at any time and includes requisite Windows-based CV XE GIS software. The course assumes the participant has basic familiarity with a Windows computer, Internet and spreadsheet operations. No GIS related experience is required. Experienced GIS professionals also benefit by learning about the use and nuances of Census-sourced data and integrating these with other data. The structure includes four segments that typically require 2.5 hours each. It is feasible to complete the course in a day or two though we suggest two weeks.

Use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with TIGER … integrate/analyze data from American Community Survey (ACS) or the decennial census (Census 2010) (Census 2020) into TIGER files to make thematic maps. Merge data from other statistical programs. Geocode your address-based data and add the geocoded data to a GIS project/map view; examine patterns. View your market/service areas and assess competitive position, unmet opportunities. Learn about procedures and strategies to develop GIS projects that meet your needs. Acquire the tools and data to perform these tasks without spending more — provided as a part of our course.

The course is not just about TIGER and demographic-economic data. It provides a well-rounded framework for how to use GIS. While TIGER is a focus, we review procedures to access and use thousands of public use shapefiles and GIS files that may be useful to you. It provides a well-rounded framework for how to use GIS.

Enroll today …
Click the enrollment button/link (opens new page) to enroll now ($395). We will contact you and provide next step information.   Questions? Call us at (800)364-7656.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Demographics Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Visualizing Metro Area Geography

.. metropolitan areas are referred to as CBSAs (Core-Based Statistical Areas) and formally defined as sets of contiguous counties for the Federal Statistical System by OMB based largely on Census Bureau data.  More than 93-percent of the U.S. population live in CBSAs. This post presents three map graphics showing the geographic configuration of CBSAs and related CSAs (Combined Statistical Areas) — groupings of contiguous CBSAs that meet certain criteria. See related Web section for more detail.

The graphics below use the September 2018 CBSA vintage, the current and likely to be used for Census 2020 tabulations. These CBSAs are comprised of 392 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), 384 MSAs in the U.S. and 8 in Puerto Rico, and 546 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs), 542 in the U.S. and 4 in Puerto Rico. For those MSAs that qualify, 11 MSAs are subdivided into 31 Metropolitan Divisions (MDs).

Metro Demographic-Economic Insights. What are the demographic characteristics of metros, how are they changing? We have developed annual population and population components of change estimates for the September 2018 vintage CBSAs.  Access these data in this interactive table. View CBSA county components. These data are integrated with other data to develop wide-ranging demographic-economic current estimates and projections for CBSAs and other geography (Situation & Outlook).

Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Sep 2018 Vintage
The following graphic shows the 2018 vintage Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). Use the associated GIS project to examine different years or subject matter items. Click graphic for larger view showing combined MSAs and MISAs.
Expand browser window for best quality view.


.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. create other views, geospatially analyze your data with associated GIS project.

Micropolitan Statistical Areas, Sep 2018 Vintage
The following graphic shows the 2018 vintage Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs). Use the associated GIS project to examine different years or subject matter items. Click graphic for larger view showing combined MSAs and MISAs. Expand browser window for best quality view.


.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. create other views, geospatially analyze your data with associated GIS project.

Combined Statistical Areas, Sep 2018 Vintage
The following graphic shows the 2018 vintage Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs).
CSAs are contiguous CBSAs that are combined to form a CSA when certain conditions are met. Use the associated GIS project to examine different years or subject matter items. Click graphic for larger view showing CSAs with county overlay (visually determining which counties are in a CSA). Expand browser window for best quality view.


.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. create other views, geospatially analyze your data with associated GIS project.

DemographicEconomic Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Demographics Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State of the States: Demographic Economic Update

.. tools and resources to examine the demographic-economic state of the states .. in 2016, the U.S. median housing value was $205,000 while states ranged from $113,900 (Mississippi) to $592,000 (Hawaii). See item/column H089 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on this measure … in context of related housing characteristics. These data uniquely provide insights into many of the most important housing characteristics.

Use new tools, data and methods to access, integrate and analyze demographic-economic conditions for the U.S. and states. These data will update in September 2018.

Approximately 600 subject matter items from the American Community Survey ACS 2016 database (released September 2017) are included in these four pages/tables:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics
• Economic Characteristics
• Housing Characteristics

GIS, Data Integration & Visual Data Analysis
Use data extracted from these tables in a ready-to-use GIS project. These ACS sourced data (from the four tables listed above) have been integrated with population estimates trend data, components of change and personal income quarterly trend data. See details in this section.

Examining Characteristics & Trends
Below are four thematic pattern maps extracted from the main sections listed above. Click a map graphic for a larger view. Use the GIS project to create variations of these views.

Patterns of Median Age by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows median age. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column D017 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on median age.

Patterns of Educational Attainment by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows % college graduates. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column S067 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on percent college graduates.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows $MHI. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column E062 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on median household income.

Patterns of Median Housing Value by State
Yellow label shows the state USPS abbreviation; white label shows $MHV. Legend shows color patterns associated with percent population change 2010-2016.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– See item/column H089 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze state based on median housing value.

Examining Characteristics & Trends; Using Data Analytics
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metro Population & Components of Change Trends 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine how the U.S. by metro population is changing. Is the population moving away or into metros of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

This section provides information on how and why the population is changing by metro from 2010 to 2016 in terms of components of change: births, deaths and migration. It provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by metro using latest Census Bureau estimates through 2016. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual demographic-economic projections.  See related Web page to access full interactive table and more detail.

Patterns of Population Change by Metro, 2010-2016
The following graphic shows how metros (MSAs – Metropolitan Statisticsl Areas) changed from 2010 to 2016 based on percent population change. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Narrative Analysis of Metro Demographic Change in Context
A narrative summary and analysis of metro demographic characteristics and change, contextually with other data and geography, is provided for each metro in the Situation & Outlook Reports. See more about the wide-ranging subject matter that are knitted together in the schedule of updates. Examine metro dynamics in context of the U.S. overall and related states and counties.

The nation’s 382 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) had a population of 277.1 million in 2016 (86% of the total population). MSAs increased by 2.3 million people from 2015. The nation’s 551 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs) had a population of 27.7 million in 2016 (9% of the total population). MISAs increased by 16,000 people from 2015. See more highlights below

MSAs and MISAs together, or metro areas, comprised the set of Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs). Each metro/CBSA is defined as a set of one or more contiguous counties.

Related Sections
• Metros Main
• Situation & Outlook Reports
• City/Place Population Trends
• County Population Trends
• County Population Projections to 2060
• ProximityOne Data Service

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

See more about these topics below:
• Natural Increase/Change; birth & deaths
• Migration; net international, net domestic, net migration

Using the Interactive Table – Peer Group Analysis
Use the full interactive table to examine U.S. national scope metros by population and components of change. Consider an application where you want to study metros having a 2016 population between 250,000 and 300,000. Use the tools below the interactive table to select these metros as illustrated in the graphic shown below. The graphic shows these metros ranked on the overall U.S. metro rank (percent population change 2010-2016). As shown in the graphic, the Greeley, CO metro was ranked 11th among all metros and the fastest growing metro in this group. Use the tools/buttons below the table to create custom views.

Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining County Migration: 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine U.S. by county migration 2010 to 2016 … is the population moving away or into your counties of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

The total net international migration among all counties 7/1/2010 – 7/1/2016 was 5,641,260, an annual average of 940,432. The sum of net domestic migration among counties is zero by definition, but domestic migration among counties varies radically by size and direction. This section is focused on U.S. by county migration from 2010 to 2016. Migration is one component of change used to develop population estimates. See more about county population estimates and components of change in this related Web section.

Largest 10 Counties Based on 2016 Population
This table shows how domestic migration varies widely among the most populated counties. Use this interactive table to develop your own custom views for counties of interest.

Patterns of Population Change by County, 2010-2016
– the role and impact of migration
The following graphic shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2016. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Examining Population Components of Change
– net migration and natural change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

Using the Interactive Table
– examining migration by county
Use the interactive table to examine characters of counties by states, metro or peer group. The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to view net migration for the Houston metro by county. The net migration button was used to select only the net migration columns, FindCBSA button used to show only counties in this metro and the final step was to sort the resulting table on 2016 population. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Using CV XE GIS: New GIS Start-up Project

.. expanding insights through data analytics ..  a new CV XE GIS start-up project, described in this section, is now part of the CV XE GIS installer. The latest GIS project uses U.S. national scope shapefiles newly developed as of April 2016. You can immediately start using this GIS project in a production manner. See more below. Join in the weekly Data Analytics Lab sessions where structure and use of this project and shapefiles are discussed. See the Web version of this section.

It is recommended that existing users re-install the CV XE GIS software. In addition to the new US1 GIS project, there are software updates. Software updates and related applications will be reviewed in upcoming blog sections focused on “Using CV XE GIS.”

Join the ProximityOne User Group and start using the new US1 GIS project — included with all versions of CV XE GIS software.

National scope state, metro and county layers are all active upon start-up. States are transparent showing only boundaries. Metros/CBSAs reflect a query that has been set to show only the largest 10 metros (based on 2015 population). The county layer shows a thematic pattern map of the population percent change between 2010 and 2015.

CV XE GIS US1 Project Start-up View
The start-up view shows a thematic pattern map of percent population change, 2010-2015.  Click graphic shown below for a larger. more detailed view. Expand browser window for best quality larger graphic viewing.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

The US1 GIS project includes these shapefiles/resources:
• U.S. by State
• U.S. by Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) – 929 metropolitan areas
• U.S. by County – 3,142 county areas
• OpenStreetMaps Web-based tiling layer
• each shapefile includes integrated Census 2010 population and annual population estimates 2010 through 2015.

Full User Interface View

The legend panel, shown below at left of map window, includes seven layers. Five layers are checked on; this results in
the layer being displayed in the map window. The metros and counties layers are included twice; the upper, unchecked, layer is set to show area names as labels.

Applications
• Use the navigation tools to zoom to an area of interest.
.. for example, zoom-in to the Houston metro (click for larger view).
   
• Determine which counties, metros or states are changing most rapidly.
.. and how they are changing.
• Use the latest official population estimates.
• Easily compare county components of a metro to total metro.
• Use the navigation tools to zoom to an area of interest.
.. for example, zoom-in to the Houston metro (any metro).
• Use layer editor tools to add labels, modify intervals/colors, change/add patterns and more.
.. for example, check-on the county labels layer to easily view county names..
• Add other layers showing different types of geography and subject matter.
• Integrate other types of subject matter into the existing shapefiles.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.