Category Archives: population components of change

Metro Population & Components of Change Trends 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine how the U.S. by metro population is changing. Is the population moving away or into metros of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

This section provides information on how and why the population is changing by metro from 2010 to 2016 in terms of components of change: births, deaths and migration. It provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by metro using latest Census Bureau estimates through 2016. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual demographic-economic projections.  See related Web page to access full interactive table and more detail.

Patterns of Population Change by Metro, 2010-2016
The following graphic shows how metros (MSAs – Metropolitan Statisticsl Areas) changed from 2010 to 2016 based on percent population change. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Narrative Analysis of Metro Demographic Change in Context
A narrative summary and analysis of metro demographic characteristics and change, contextually with other data and geography, is provided for each metro in the Situation & Outlook Reports. See more about the wide-ranging subject matter that are knitted together in the schedule of updates. Examine metro dynamics in context of the U.S. overall and related states and counties.

The nation’s 382 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) had a population of 277.1 million in 2016 (86% of the total population). MSAs increased by 2.3 million people from 2015. The nation’s 551 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs) had a population of 27.7 million in 2016 (9% of the total population). MISAs increased by 16,000 people from 2015. See more highlights below

MSAs and MISAs together, or metro areas, comprised the set of Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs). Each metro/CBSA is defined as a set of one or more contiguous counties.

Related Sections
• Metros Main
• Situation & Outlook Reports
• City/Place Population Trends
• County Population Trends
• County Population Projections to 2060
• ProximityOne Data Service

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

See more about these topics below:
• Natural Increase/Change; birth & deaths
• Migration; net international, net domestic, net migration

Using the Interactive Table – Peer Group Analysis
Use the full interactive table to examine U.S. national scope metros by population and components of change. Consider an application where you want to study metros having a 2016 population between 250,000 and 300,000. Use the tools below the interactive table to select these metros as illustrated in the graphic shown below. The graphic shows these metros ranked on the overall U.S. metro rank (percent population change 2010-2016). As shown in the graphic, the Greeley, CO metro was ranked 11th among all metros and the fastest growing metro in this group. Use the tools/buttons below the table to create custom views.

Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining County Migration: 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine U.S. by county migration 2010 to 2016 … is the population moving away or into your counties of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

The total net international migration among all counties 7/1/2010 – 7/1/2016 was 5,641,260, an annual average of 940,432. The sum of net domestic migration among counties is zero by definition, but domestic migration among counties varies radically by size and direction. This section is focused on U.S. by county migration from 2010 to 2016. Migration is one component of change used to develop population estimates. See more about county population estimates and components of change in this related Web section.

Largest 10 Counties Based on 2016 Population
This table shows how domestic migration varies widely among the most populated counties. Use this interactive table to develop your own custom views for counties of interest.

Patterns of Population Change by County, 2010-2016
– the role and impact of migration
The following graphic shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2016. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Examining Population Components of Change
– net migration and natural change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

Using the Interactive Table
– examining migration by county
Use the interactive table to examine characters of counties by states, metro or peer group. The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to view net migration for the Houston metro by county. The net migration button was used to select only the net migration columns, FindCBSA button used to show only counties in this metro and the final step was to sort the resulting table on 2016 population. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Using CV XE GIS: New GIS Start-up Project

.. expanding insights through data analytics ..  a new CV XE GIS start-up project, described in this section, is now part of the CV XE GIS installer. The latest GIS project uses U.S. national scope shapefiles newly developed as of April 2016. You can immediately start using this GIS project in a production manner. See more below. Join in the weekly Data Analytics Lab sessions where structure and use of this project and shapefiles are discussed. See the Web version of this section.

It is recommended that existing users re-install the CV XE GIS software. In addition to the new US1 GIS project, there are software updates. Software updates and related applications will be reviewed in upcoming blog sections focused on “Using CV XE GIS.”

Join the ProximityOne User Group and start using the new US1 GIS project — included with all versions of CV XE GIS software.

National scope state, metro and county layers are all active upon start-up. States are transparent showing only boundaries. Metros/CBSAs reflect a query that has been set to show only the largest 10 metros (based on 2015 population). The county layer shows a thematic pattern map of the population percent change between 2010 and 2015.

CV XE GIS US1 Project Start-up View
The start-up view shows a thematic pattern map of percent population change, 2010-2015.  Click graphic shown below for a larger. more detailed view. Expand browser window for best quality larger graphic viewing.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

The US1 GIS project includes these shapefiles/resources:
• U.S. by State
• U.S. by Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) – 929 metropolitan areas
• U.S. by County – 3,142 county areas
• OpenStreetMaps Web-based tiling layer
• each shapefile includes integrated Census 2010 population and annual population estimates 2010 through 2015.

Full User Interface View

The legend panel, shown below at left of map window, includes seven layers. Five layers are checked on; this results in
the layer being displayed in the map window. The metros and counties layers are included twice; the upper, unchecked, layer is set to show area names as labels.

Applications
• Use the navigation tools to zoom to an area of interest.
.. for example, zoom-in to the Houston metro (click for larger view).
   
• Determine which counties, metros or states are changing most rapidly.
.. and how they are changing.
• Use the latest official population estimates.
• Easily compare county components of a metro to total metro.
• Use the navigation tools to zoom to an area of interest.
.. for example, zoom-in to the Houston metro (any metro).
• Use layer editor tools to add labels, modify intervals/colors, change/add patterns and more.
.. for example, check-on the county labels layer to easily view county names..
• Add other layers showing different types of geography and subject matter.
• Integrate other types of subject matter into the existing shapefiles.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State of the States: 2010-2015

.. examining the how, why and where of population change by state from 2010 to 2015. This section provides an overview of this topic and provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by state by county, using latest Census Bureau estimates data through 2015. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual national state and county demographic-economic projections. See schedule of related 2016 updates. See more about development of these data/reports below.

Updates … see related State and Regional Decision-Making Information section … frequently updated state-by-state pages.

Patterns of Net Migration by State, 2010-2015
The following graphic shows patterns of state net migration during 2010 to 2015. 14 states experienced negative net migration. See in table below. States are labeled with net migration 2010-15 as a percent of 2015 population. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a region’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

State by County Profiles
Click a state link to view a state by county profile. For each state, eight tables of population change are presented. Each of the eight tables shows characteristics of each/all counties in the state in addition to state overall.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Use the Interactive Table
.. to examine patterns in states of interest. The following interactive table graphic shows the 14 states that experienced negative domestic migration during the period 2010-2015. See full full interactive table. Click link for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Appalachia Region & County Population Trends

.. examining how is the Appalachia population changing and why .. Appalachia is a region that includes parts of 13 states and has long been challenged with poverty. The population of Appalachia increased from 25,184,339 in 2010 to 25,449,932 in 2015. The extended report below, developed using the ProximityOne Regional Data Analytics tool, in combination with GIS tools provide insights into why, how and where the population change has occurred since 2010.

Patterns of Appalachia County Population Trends 2010-2015
Appalachia counties are shown in the following graphic with the black bold boundary. The thematic pattern map shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2015. It is easy to see clusters of counties that are increasing or losing population and why. Counties increasing in population are shown by the dominant factor contributing to their growth — net migration or natural change (where births exceed deaths). Counties decreasing in population are shown by the dominant factor contributing to their population loss — net migration or natural change (where deaths exceed births). See more detail and access data via interactive table in the County Trends 2010-2015 section. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Summary of Population Change
Appalachia has increased in population since 2010 due to both net migration and natural increase. The analyses show that during the 2010 to 2015 period, the Appalachia population:
• increased by 1,688,832 births
• experienced 1,562,810 deaths
• had a natural increase (births less deaths) of 126,022 population
• increased by 166,990 net international migration
• increased by 53,209 net domestic migration
• had a net migration of 220,199 population

Region & County-by-County Population & Components of Change
The RDA report includes eight tables for each county and a summary for the Appalachia region. Tables displayed when using the “Population Estimates & Components” data include:
• Table 1 – total population
• Table 2 – births
• Table 3 – deaths
• Table 4 – natural change
• Table 5 – international migration
• Table 6 – domestic migration
• Table 7 – net migration
• Table 8 – group quarters population

Appalachia Counties & Region: Population Trends & Components of Change; 2010-2015
Click link below to view report. Data for all Appalachia counties, followed the regional summary, are provided table-by-table in the table sequence shown above.
Appalachia region population & components of change 2010-15

Terms of Use
The above report may be used for any purpose provided that:
1 – it is not used for commercial or consulting purposes.
2 – it is not used in funded research.
3 – all use is referenced as to source with Web URL:
— developed by ProximityOne based in part on Census Bureau data; http://proximityone.com/rda.htm.

Using the RDA Resources
Use the RDA tool to develop reports like the one shown here for counties and regions of interest. Possibly more importantly, these resources can help us examine related topics such as healthcare and education. What are the characteristics and requirements now and how are needs, services and capabilities distributed across a region? How will the population change over the next several years and possibly result in improving – or deteriorating – conditions? Use the RDA demographic insights features and predictive analytics to better assess future change and needs.

Contact ProximityOne (mention RDA in text section or call 888.364.7656) for more information about using the RDA resources or custom reports.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about accessing and using demographic-economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Data Analytics Lab session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

County Population Trends 2010-2015

.. examining the how and why of U.S. population change by county from 2010 to 2015. This section provides an overview of this topic and provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by county using latest Census Bureau estimates data through 2015. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual county demographic-economic projections. See related Web section for more detail.

Patterns of Population Change by County, 2010-2015
The following graphic shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2015. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. see related drill-down views of Texas by county

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

See more about these topics below:
Natural Increase/Change; birth & deaths
Migration; net international, net domestic, net migration

Interactive Analysis
Use the interactive table to view population trends and components of change for selected counties. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used.
• Click the ShowAll button (below table)
• Click the Pop Min & Max button .. refreshes table
    to show only counties with 2015 population 250,000-300,000
• Click ChgCols button to show all 2010-15 change columns
• Click PopChg 2010-15 header column to sort.

Resulting view:
Among these counties, Horry County, SC has the largest 2010-15 population change. The peer group counties are shown in rank order.

– Click graphic for larger view.
– experiment with settings of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

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