Category Archives: Cities & Counties

Location-Based Demographics Update

.. tools you can use to examine characteristics of addresses/locations .. many of us are interested in knowing attributes of addresses or locations. Often knowing address latitude-longitude is important so that the addresses can be viewed on a map .. see below.  Some might need to know what census block, or other geography, in which an address is located .. or what school district is an address located in.  Others need to know demographic-economic attributes of the neighborhood or area where an address is located.  These types of attributes can be obtained for addresses using the Location-Based Demographic (LBD) tools.  The LBD tool has just been made a part of the CV XE GIS software.  The LBD tool is available in all versions of CV XE GIS, including the no fee User Group version. See more about using the LBD tools to look-up and analyze address/location attributes.

Viewing Geocoded Addresses on a Map – automatically
The following view shows addresses geocoded using the LBD tool. Markers show addresses of 27 Trader Joe’s locations in the Los Angeles area. LBD automatically creates a shapefile that is added to your GIS project. The markers are labeled with population ages 18 and over in the corresponding census tract. Marker color/styles reflect different levels of median household income. A separate census tract layer shows patterns of economic prosperity.

Click graphic for larger view. Expand browser window. A mini profile is displayed showing demographic-economic attributes for the marker at pointer.

View the locations without the tract thematic pattern layer:

Make similar views for your addresses.

Get Started Using the LBD Tool
1 – join the User Group .. click here to join (no fee).
2 – run the installer to install on a Windows machine .. requires your userid.
3 – with CV XE GIS running, click Tools>Find Address/LBD
    enter an address .. a form appears showing characteristics of the address.
4 – see more about using the tools on the LDB page.

GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning Sessions
We are developing a series of “GeoStatistical Data Analytics” (GSDA) Learning Sessions/modules. One of these is focused on using the LBD tools and methods in the broader context of data analytics. We plan to develop the GSDA models for self-guided use by analysts/practitioners as well as in the classroom setting with teacher/student materials. Upcoming blog posts will describe the program in more detail.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Web Session, every Tuesday, where we review access to and use of data, tools and methods relating to GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning. We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

How & Why State Demographics Are Changing

.. to examine how and why state demographics are changing, we look at the state as the sum of its parts — counties. Here we review tools and data to examine how and why state/county population is changing … is the population moving away or into your areas of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? what are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business? See related Web section for more detail on topics covered here and access interactive table.

Patterns of Population Change by County, 2010-2017
The following graphic shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2017. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

The above graphic provides a visual summary of how and why demographics are changing from 2010 to 2017 in terms of components of change: births, deaths and migration. See the underlying data in this interactive table.

Change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase/change. The other way an area population changes is through migration (net international, net domestic, net migration). Examining an area’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

Examine States of Interest
Click a state link to view details about specific states …
Alabama .. Alaska .. Arizona .. Arkansas .. California .. Colorado .. Connecticut .. Delaware .. Florida .. Georgia .. Hawaii .. Idaho .. Illinois .. Indiana .. Iowa .. Kansas .. Kentucky .. Louisiana .. Maine .. Maryland .. Massachusetts .. Michigan .. Minnesota .. Mississippi .. Missouri .. Montana .. Nebraska .. Nevada .. New Hampshire .. New Jersey .. New Mexico .. New York .. North Carolina .. North Dakota .. Ohio .. Oklahoma .. Oregon .. Pennsylvania .. Rhode Island .. South Carolina .. South Dakota .. Tennessee .. Texas .. Utah .. Vermont .. Virginia .. Washington .. West Virginia .. Wisconsin .. Wyoming

Situation & Outlook Briefing Sessions
Join me in a Situation & Outlook Briefing Session, every Tuesday, where we review the where, what, how, and when of demographic-economic-business change – and how change might impact you.  We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

 

Examining America’s Cities: Demographic-Economic Updates

.. of the approximate 29,500 U.S. cities and places — geographic areas of population concentration — 301 had an ACS 2016 5-year estimated population of 100,000 or more. The median household income among these places, one measure of economic prosperity, ranged from $26,249 (Detroit, MI) to $117,642 (Frisco, TX).

What are the demographic-economic characteristics of your cities/places of interest? How do these compare to peer groups or a metro/state of interest. Learn more using the new city/place demographic interactive tables. Its about more than economic prosperity — using these data provide otherwise unknowable attributes about the demographic, social, economic and housing characteristics of individual cities/places.

Visual Analysis of City/Place Population Dynamics
The following view shows patterns of population percent change by city in the Charlotte, NC/SC metro area.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… more about above view in City/Place Economic Characteristics section.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity ($MHI) by City/Place
— Northern Virginia, DC, Maryland; part of the Washington, DC metro.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click graphic for larger view with places labeled by name and $MHI.

Interactive Tables — new January 2018
Use these interactive tables to get answers, build insights:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics
• Economic Characteristics — used to develop data at top of section
• Housing Characteristics
Related:
• City/Place GeoDemographics Main Section
• Annual City/Place Population Estimates & Trends
• Similar ACS tables: Census Tracts | ZIP Codes | State, Metro & County

More About City/Place GeoStatistical Data and Data Analytics
The term “places” as used here refers to incorporated places and Census Designated Places (CDPs). Incorporated places are political areas having certain governmental powers designated by the corresponding state. Unincorporated places, or Census Designated Places (CDPs), are statistical areas having no official standing and no governmental powers but are recognized as being areas of population concentration. Wide-ranging demographic-economic estimates are developed annually for the approximate 29,500 incorporated cities and CDPs based on the American Community Survey 5-year estimates. See more about the ACS 2016 5-year estimates.

Many cities have planning and data development operations that develop important local data including tax parcel data, building permit data, transportation and infrastructure data … bit generally not the data reviewed in this section. Many cities have no planning department to develop, organize and analyze geographic, demographic, economic data … making these data even more essential.

Increasingly in core sections of metropolitan areas, as shown in the above graphics, a large number of cities/places are contiguous. Many retain their own character evolving over many years. Having the detailed ACS demographic-economic data makes it possible to compare places side by side. Use the same data for related drill down geography such as census tracts and block groups to examine neighborhoods and market areas.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

School District Demographic Trends: 2010-2016

.. while enrollment in many school districts is growing, for many it is declining — these include some of the largest districts. Declining enrollment in school districts can result in school closings that destabilize neighborhoods, cause layoffs of essential staff and concerns that the students who remain are some of the neediest and most difficult to educate. See related narrative.

Based on total population, the largest 10 school districts in 2016 (see table below), all experienced an increase in population over the period 2010-2016. Five of these districts had a decrease in school age population (ages 5-17 years). Five of these districts had a decrease in the number of related children in poverty in families ages 5-17 years.

See the related Web section that provides tools to analyze annual demographic data for each U.S. school district for the period 2010 through 2016. This post summarizes selected details. These data include Census Bureau official 2016 estimates available for all districts. Developed for use as inputs for the ESEA Title I allocation formula, the data have broader uses of interest to school district demographics stakeholders. The 2016 estimates were released in November 2016; 2017 estimates become available in late 2018. ProximityOne uses these data in combination with other data to develop school district current estimates and annual projections through 2022 with related drill-down demographic-economic subject matter. Use the interactive table in the Web section to view, rank, compare demographic characteristics of districts of interest.

Largest 10 School Districts based on 2016 Population Age 5-17

Patterns of 2016 School Age Population in Poverty by School District
The graphic below shows school districts with total 2016 population of 1,000 or more by poverty incidence. Markers show the population ages 5-17 in families in poverty as a percent of population ages 5-17. Salmon markers: 40-50%. Red markers: 50% or more.

– view developed with CVGIS software and related GIS project.

School District Demographic Trends Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare demographic characteristics of districts of interest.

More About K-12 Education & Children’s Demographics
See the related section on School District Demographic Trends 2010-2016:
http://proximityone.com/sdtrends.htm.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on L

Examining America’s 10 Largest Urban Areas

.. why it matters .. among other reasons, these 10 areas have 24% of the total U.S. population. Three have increased by more than 20% in the past 5 years.

More than 80-percent of America’s population is urban, but far more than 80-percent of America’s geography is rural. Census 2010 shows that America’s urban population increased by 12.1 percent from 2000 to 2010, compared to the national overall growth rate of 9.7 percent. Urban areas now account for 80.7 percent of the U.S. population, compared to 79.0 percent in 2000.

America’s 10 Largest Urbanized Areas
The following table shows the largest 10 Urbanized Areas (UAs) based on the American Community Survey 2011 and 2016 1-year estimates (ACS2016) and change over the period. UAs are sorted in descending order based on the 2016 population estimate. Note that Atlanta, Dallas and Houston moved up in rank.

Geodemographic relationships vary widely between the urbanized areas (UAs). Some, such as Miami, comprise most or all of the urban area within the corresponding metropolitan statistical area. Others, such as Philadelphia, are nested within a mix of adjacent urban areas interspersed with rural areas. Among other things, these different geodemographic structures reflect how planning, needs assessment and market development vary widely from associated metro-to-metro. These data show the importance and need to consider the urban/rural population distribution even in the largest metros.

Visual Analysis — Dallas Urbanized Area
The urbanized area (UA) of the corresponding metropolitan statistical area (MSA) generally occupies less than half of the MSA.
See the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA Situation and Outlook Report

… View developed using CV XE GIS.

Map Views for Each of the Largest 10 Urbanized Areas
Maps for each of the 10 largest UAs are shown at
http://proximityone.com/urbanareas_2016.htm.

Each graphic shows the designated urbanized area in a darker salmon color fill pattern, associated metropolitan statistical area with bold brown boundary, and other urban areas with a lighter shade of salmon fill color, counties black boundaries and yellow labels. The ACS 2016 UA population is shown as a white label under the UA name. The ACS 2016 estimates are the most recent data available and will update with 2017 estimates in late 2018.

More About Analyzing Urban/Rural Patterns and Characteristics
See the related section on America’s urban/rural population and geography:
http://proximityone.com/urbanpopulation.htm.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on L

Creating Custom Demographic Datasets with API Tools

.. develop national scale spreadsheet files with virtually no learning time .. easy-to-use API operations to create national scope demographic-economic datasets based on American Community Survey 2016 1-year estimates .. custom subject matter selections. See more detail in related web sections ACS2016 and ACS2016_API.

Benefits and utility … how to acquire a spreadsheet showing the population of all cities with population estimates based on the ACS 2016 1-year data? … or, housing units, median household income, median housing value, etc.? Variations of this need frequently arise — what is the list of largest California counties sorted on total population: What are the 25 metros having the highest median household income? Which 10 congressional districts have the highest poverty incidence? Which urban areas have the highest educational attainment?

Use simple API calls described below to get answers to these types of questions — and more.  Create files that can be used for recurring applications. An example …

Urban Areas with 2016 Population 65,000+ Population
… results from using the API downloaded data … the following graphic shows urban areas with 65,000 or more 2016 population; zoom-in to Texas. The full national scope GIS project is available as described below; examine U.S. or any region. The file used to develop this view was created using the results of the API call reviewed below (requires integration of those data into the urban areas shapefile). Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window. Larger view shows urban areas labeled with name and mini profile for Dallas UA showing all subject matter items downloaded (via API) as described below.

… View developed using CV XE GIS.
… See more about Urban Population & Urban Areas.

Access ACS 2016 1-Year Data Using API Tools
Here are the API links … use these API calls to access/download selected items for selected geographies. See more about using API tools. Click a link and receive a return page with CSV-like structured data. See usage notes below. As these are ACS 2016 1 year estimates; geographies are only available for areas 65,000+ population.
Click a link:
• All U.S. cities/places
• All U.S. counties
• All U.S. CBSAs
• All U.S. Urban Areas
• All 115th Congressional Districts
• All U.S. states
• U.S. only

The following data retrieval operations are by state. These are examples using Arizona (FIPS state code 04).
• All [within state] Elementary School Districts
• All [within state] Secondary School Districts
• All [within state] Unified School Districts

API Call Returned Data Usage Notes
Clicking the All U.S. cities/places link above generates a new page with content very much like a CSV file. Try it .. click an above link.

See the related ACS2016_API web section for more details.

Items Retrieved in the API Calls
The sample header record above shows the subject matter item listed at the left in the following set of items. Modify API call and use other subject matter items. See full array of subject matter – xlsx file.
.. B01003_001E – Total population
Age
.. B01001_011E — Male: 25 to 29 years (illustrating age cohort access)
.. B01001_035E — Female: 25 to 29 years (illustrating age cohort access)
Race/Origin
.. B02001_002E – White alone
.. B02001_003E – Black or African American alone
.. B02001_004E – American Indian and Alaska Native alone
.. B02001_005E – Asian alone
.. B02001_006E – Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone
.. B02001_007E – Some other race alone
.. B02001_008E – Two or more races
.. B03001_003E – Hispanic (of any race)
Income
.. B19013_001E – Median household income ($)
.. B19113_001E – Median family income ($)
Housing & Households
.. B25001_001E – Total housing units
.. B25002_002E – Occupied housing units (households)
.. B19001_017E — Households with household income $200,000 or more
.. B25003_002E — Owner Occupied housing units
.. B25075_025E — Housing units value $1,000,000 to $1,499,999
.. B25075_026E — Housing units with value $1,500,000 to $1,999,999
.. B25075_027E — Housing units with value $2,000,000 or more
.. B25002_003E – Vacant housing units
.. B25077_001E – Median housing value ($) – owner occupied units
.. B25064_001E – Median gross rent ($) – renter occupied units

The rightmost fields/columns in the rows/records contain the area name and geographic codes.

Using API Tools for Data Analytics
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on L

Low & Moderate Income Census Tracts; 2017 Update

..  data and tools to analyze characteristics and patterns of census tract geography with a focus on low and moderate income.   See related Web page for more detail.

Of the total 75,883 census tracts for which low and moderate income data were tabulated in the HMDA 2017 data, 6,023 (8.7%) were low income, 16,873 (24.5%) were moderate income, 32,509 (47.1%) were middle income and 19,159 (27.8%) were upper income. See more about these classifications. Find out about your tracts/neighborhoods of interest and how they compare to others using data and tools provided in this section.

Analysis of the low, moderate, middle, and upper income of the population and households by small area geography is important to housing market stakeholders, lenders, investors, cities/neighborhoods and others. Low and moderate income data by block group and census tract are used for compliance, eligibility determination and program performance in many Federal programs and agencies.

• Use the interactive table below to view, query, compare, sort census tracts.
• Use tract estimates & projections to examine changing characteristics.
– extended demographic-economic measures, annual 2010-2022

Low & Moderate Income by Census Tract
The following view shows census tracts designated as low and moderate income (orange fill pattern) in the the Houston, TX MSA (bold brown boundary) area. These are tracts having income level with codes 1 and 2 in the interactive table. A wide range of market insights can be created zoom-in views for counties, cities and neighborhoods and linking these with other data. Make variations of this view using ProximityOne data and tools described in this section.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

View similar maps for these areas:
.. Atlanta metro
.. Chicago, IL metro
.. Dallas, TX metro
.. Knoxville, TN metro
.. with drill-down views for Knoxville city
.. Los Angeles, CA metro
.. San Francisco, CA metro

Using the Interactive Table
  – Examining LMI Tracts in Your Metro

Use the interactive table to view, query, sort compare tracts based on various demographic and LMI characteristitcs. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used to view low and moderate income tracts for the Charlotte, NC-SC metro.
– click ShowAll button below table.
– enter a CBSA code in the edit box at right of Find CBSA LMI>.
– click the Find CBSA LMI button.
Resulting display of Charlotte metro LMI tracts only.

– click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.