Category Archives: Principal cities

American Community Survey 2018: Geography & Access

.. there are 519 core-Based Statistical Areas (metros & micros) included as American Community Survey (ACS) 2018 tabulation areas. 2018 demographic-economic estimates are included for these and many other types of political/statistical areas — the subject of this section. This is the first in a series of posts about accessing, integrating and using the ACS 2018 data. Learn more about effective ways to use these and related data. See the main web section for more detail and access to the interactive table. The release date for the ACS 2018 data is September 26, 2019.

ACS 2018 1-year Tabulation Areas: 519 Core-Based Statistical Areas
— MSAs and MISAs

– view developed using ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
– geospatial analyze ACS 2018 1 year estimates integrated with your data to examine patterns; gain insights.

The 2018 American Community Survey (ACS 2018 main) is a nationwide survey designed to provide annually updated demographic-economic data for national and sub-national geography. ACS provides a wide range of important data about people and housing for every community across the nation. The results are used by everyone from planners to retailers to homebuilders and issue stakeholders like you. ACS is a primary source of local data for most of the 40 topics it covers, such as income, education, occupation, language and housing.

Determining What Data are Tabulated
The graphics below illustrate 1) the scroll section that lists the types of tabulation areas (summary levels) and 2) use of the interactive table to display a selection of CBSAs/metros (summary level 310).

ACS 2018 1-Year Summary Levels
The scroll section (see in web page) shows the summary level code (left column), part or component if applicable and summary level name.

ACS 2018 1-Year Estimates — Areas Published — Interactive Table
The interactive table (click link to view actual interactive table) enables you to list the geographic areas tabulated. This graphic shows CBSAs (MSAs and MISAs) tabulated. GeoID1 shows the unique tabulation area geocode for an area among all areas. GeoID1 inlcudes the summary level (first 3 characters), followed by state FIPS code where applicable, ‘US’ and finally the geocode for the specific area.

Demographic-Economic Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Demographics Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

America’s Million+ Population Cities

.. there are 10 million+ population cities in the U.S. .. each is reviewed in some detail in this section .. the change in U.S. city population from 2010 to 2015 ranged from growth of 357,979 in New York City to a decline of in Detroit, MI. New York City is actually five counties; the next largest city growth was Houston, TX with a 181,463 population gain. See cities with largest growth or decline using the interactive table.

The July 1, 2015 Census Bureau model-based estimates for the U.S. 19,505 incorporated cities show a total population of 202,066,769 compared to 192,179,239 as of Census 2010. These areas are incorporated cities as recognized by their corresponding state governments and granted certain governmental rights and responsibilities. ProximityOne integrates these estimates, with related data, in models to develop projections, examine change and assess the impact of change.

Largest 10 Cities — the Million-Plus Population Cities
The largest 10 cities in 2015, shown by this graphic taken from the interactive table below, are also the set of cities having 1 million or more population.

Locations and Attributes of the Largest 10 Cities
Locations of the largest 10 cities based on 2015 population are shown in the following graphic as red marker.

Examine demographic-economic attributes of these cities using these related individual city-focused sections.  These sections compare the city boundary/location with corresponding urbanized areas and include extended data from ACS 2012 and ACS 2014 1 year estimates presented in a comparative analysis format.
1. New York, NY
2. Los Angeles, CA
3. Chicago, IL
4. Houston, TX
5. Philadelphia, PA
6. Phoenix, AX
7. San Antonio, TX
8. San Diego, CA
9. Dallas, TX
10. San Jose, CA

City/Place Demographics in Context
State & Regional Demographic-Economic Characteristics & Patterns
.. individual state sections with analytical tools & data access to block level
Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook
.. continuously updated characteristics, patterns & trends for each/all metros

Visual Analysis of City/Place Population Dynamics
Use the CV XE GIS software with city/place GIS project to examine characteristics of city/place population, 2010-2015. The following view shows patterns of population percent change, 2010-15, by city in the Charlotte, NC/SC metro area.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click map for larger view and details including city name.

Individual million+ population city sections will be updated and the topic of separate future blog posts. Follow this blog to learn about updates to these and related sections.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metros 2016: Honolulu, HI Situation & Outlook

… examining Honolulu, Hawaii metropolitan area:
• How will the market for single family homes change in the next 5 years?
• How does economic prosperity in this metro compare to others?
• What are the patterns in metro rental income and rental vacancy rates?
• How do patterns vary within the metro by county/neighborhood?
• How are demographic-economic characteristics trending?

We examine these types of topics in this section. Stakeholders can replicate applications reviewed here for this and other metros. Select any metro.

.. this section now continuously updated … see Honolulu Metro Situation & Outlook; see related Hawaii Demographic-Economic Characteristics.

Metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

Focus on Honolulu, Hawaii MSA
This section is focused on the Honolulu, Hawaii MSA (formally designated by OMB as “Urban Honolulu, HI”); Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) 46520. It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather illustrate how relevant decision-making information resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights. The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro. – See a more detailed version of this document focused on this metro.

The Honolulu MSA is shown in the graphic below. The single county metropolitan statistical area is shown with bold boundary; counties appear with black boundaries and county name/geographic code labels.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

This metro is home to Fortune 1000 companies including Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc. and Hawaiian Holdings, Inc.

Principal cities (about principal cities)
… click the link to view city profile   Urban Honolulu.

The total population of the Urban Honolulu, HI metro changed from 956,336 in 2010 to 991,788 in 2014, a change of 35,452 (3.71%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 54 in 2010 and 54 in 2014, based on total population. Annual net migration was 3,980 (2011), 3,901 (2012), 4,316 (2013), -634 (2014). View annual population estimates and components of change table. See more about population characteristics below.

This metro is projected to have a total population in 2020 of 1,061,105. The projected population change from 2010 to 2020 is 104,769 (11.0%). The population ages 65 years and over is projected to change from 142,858 (2010) to 201,180 (2020), a change of 58,322 (40.8%). See more about population projections.

Based on per capita personal income (PCPI), this metro was ranked number 62 in 2008 and 74 in 2014. among the 917 metros for which personal income was estimated.The PCPI changed from $44,693 in 2008 to $49,722 in 2014, a change of $5,029 (11.3%). Per capita personal income (PCPI) is a comprehensive measure of individual economic well-being. Use the interactive table to compare PCPI in this metro to other metros. See more about PCPI in Economic Characteristics section below.

282 metropolitan statistical areas, of the total 381, experienced an increase in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) between 2009 and 2014. This metro ranked number 51 among the 381 metros based on 2014 GDP. The GDP (millions of current dollars) changed from $49,506 in 2009 to $59,271 in 2014 a change of $9,765 (19.72%). Real GDP (millions of real, inflation adjusted, dollars) changed from $49,506 in 2009 to $54,089 in 2014, a change of $4,583 (9.26%). GDP is the most comprehensive measure of metro economic activity. GDP is the sum of the GDP originating in all industries in the metro. See more about GDP in Economic Characteristics section below.

Attributes of drill-down, small area geography within the metro … metros account for 65,744 of the national scope 73,056 census tracts (others are in non-metro areas). This metro is comprised of 244 tracts covering the metro wall-to-wall. View, rank, compare demographic-economic attributes of these tracts using the interactive tables. Use the CBSA code 46520; see table usage details below the table.

The following thematic pattern shows a measure of economic prosperity (median household income: MHI) by census tract.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.
Develop variations of this map view using the Mapping Hawaii Neighborhood Patterns GIS resources.

See Zoom-in view>.

View additional selected details about the metro …
–  Component City Characteristics
–  Attributes of New Authorized Construction updated monthly
–  Component County Characteristics
–  Economic Profile
–  Component School District Characteristics

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about this metro, comparing this metro to peer group metros and use of data analytics to develop further detail related to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Dallas, TX Metro Situation & Outlook

… examining characteristics, patterns and change for the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX metropolitan area … the total population of the metro changed from 6,452,725 in 2010 to 6,954,330 in 2014, a change of 501,605 (7.77%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 4 in 2010 and 4 in 2014, based on total population …
• How will the market for single family homes change over the next 5 years?
• How does economic prosperity in this metro compare to others?
• What are the patterns in metro rental income and rental vacancy rates?
• How do patterns vary within the metro by county/neighborhood?
• How are demographic-economic characteristics trending?

We examine these types of topics in this section. Stakeholders can replicate applications reviewed here for this and other metros. Select any metro.

.. this section now continuously updated … see Dallas Metro Situation & Outlook; see related Texas Demographic-Economic Characteristics.

Metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

Focus on Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA
This section is focused on the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA; Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) 19100. It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather review recent and trending decision-making data that can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights. The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro.
– See a more detailed version of this document focused on this metro.

The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA is shown in the graphic below. The 7-county metropolitan statistical area is shown with bold boundary; counties appear with black boundaries and county name/geographic code labels.

Click graphic for larger view and details. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Neighborhood
Median household income by census tract

Click graphic for larger view and map legend. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

Develop variations of this map view using the Mapping Texas Neighborhood Patterns GIS resources.

Fortune 1000 Companies
This metro is home to 40 Fortune 1000 companies including AT&T, American Airlines, Comerica, Dean Foods, Exxon Mobil, Fluor Corporation, J.C. Penney, Kimberly-Clark, Lennox International, Michaels Stores, Neiman Marcus, RadioShack, Southwest Airlines, Tenet Healthcare and many others.

Principal Cities
Metro principal cities (about principal cities) … click the link to view city profile   Arlington .. Dallas .. Denton .. Fort Worth .. Irving .. Plano .. Richardson

Overview of Selected Demographic-Economic Characteristics
The total population of the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX metro changed from 6,452,725 in 2010 to 6,954,330 in 2014, a change of 501,605 (7.77%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 4 in 2010 and 4 in 2014, based on total population. Annual net migration was 62,320 (2011), 77,089 (2012), 57,645 (2013), 74,176 (2014). View annual population estimates and components of change table.

This metro is projected to have a total population in 2020 of 7,418,541. The projected population change from 2010 to 2020 is 965,816 (15.0%). The population ages 65 years and over is projected to change from 592,695 (2010) to 1,031,937 (2020), a change of 439,242 (74.1%). See more about population projections.

Based on per capita personal income (PCPI), this metro was ranked number 61 in 2008 and 76 in 2014. among the 917 metros for which personal income was estimated.The PCPI changed from $44,697 in 2008 to $49,506 in 2014, a change of $4,809 (10.8%). Per capita personal income (PCPI) is a comprehensive measure of individual economic well-being. Use the interactive table to compare PCPI in this metro to other metros.

282 metropolitan statistical areas, of the total 381, experienced an increase in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) between 2009 and 2014. This metro ranked number 5 among the 381 metros based on 2014 GDP. The GDP (millions of current dollars) changed from $355,756 in 2009 to $504,358 in 2014 a change of $148,602 (41.77%). Real GDP (millions of real, inflation adjusted, dollars) changed from $355,756 in 2009 to $460,154 in 2014, a change of $104,398 (29.35%). GDP is the most comprehensive measure of metro economic activity. GDP is the sum of the GDP originating in all industries in the metro.

View additional selected details about the metro …
Population Characteristics & Trends
–  Component City Characteristics
–  Component County Characteristics
– General Demographic Characteristics
Housing Characteristics & Trends
Total Housing Units
General Housing Characteristics
Residential Construction; Housing Units Authorized & Value
Housing Price Index
Economic Characteristics & Trends
Economic Profile
– Gross Domestic Product
Establishments, Employment & Earnings by Type of Business
Labor Market Characteristics & Trends
Education Infrastructure
Component School District Characteristics
Component Higher Education Institution Characteristics

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about this metro, comparing this metro to peer group metros and use of data analytics to develop further detail related to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metros 2015: Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI

… examining Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI metropolitan area:
• How will the market for single family homes change over the next 5 years?
• How does economic prosperity in this metro compare to others?
• What are the patterns in metro rental income and rental vacancy rates?
• How do patterns vary within the metro by county/neighborhood?
• How are demographic-economic characteristics trending?

We examine these types of topics in this section. Stakeholders can replicate applications reviewed here for this and other metros. Select any metro.

Metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

Focus on Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI MSA
This section is focused on the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI MSA; Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) 33460. It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather illustrate how relevant decision-making information resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights. The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro.
– See a more detailed version of this document focused on this metro.

The Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI MSA is shown in the graphic below. The 20-county metropolitan statistical area is shown with bold boundary; counties appear with black boundaries and county name/geographic code labels.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.

This metro is home to Fortune 1000 companies including 3M Company, Ameriprise Financial, Best Buy Co., General Mills, Inc., Land O’Lakes, Inc. and many others.

Metro principal cities (about principal cities) … click the link to view city profile   Bloomington .. Eagan ..  Eden Prairie .. Minneapolis .. Plymouth ..  St. Paul

The total population of the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI metro changed from 3,355,105 in 2010 to 3,495,176 in 2014, a change of 140,071 (4.17%). Among all 917 metros, this metro was ranked number 16 in 2010 and 16 in 2014, based on total population. Annual net migration was 10,659 (2011), 10,100 (2012), 13,897 (2013), 10,762 (2014). View annual population estimates and components of change table. See more about population characteristics below.

This metro is projected to have a total population in 2020 of 3,698,877. The projected population change from 2010 to 2020 is 343,772 (10.2%). The population ages 65 years and over is projected to change from 372,335 (2010) to 603,936 (2020), a change of 231,601 (62.2%). See more about population projections.

Based on per capita personal income (PCPI), this metro was ranked number 37 in 2008 and 44 in 2014. The PCPI changed from $47,956 in 2008 to $53,166 in 2014, a change of $5,210 (10.9%). Per capita personal income (PCPI) is a comprehensive measure of individual economic well-being. Use the interactive table to compare PCPI in this metro to other metros.

The following thematic pattern shows a measure of economic prosperity (median household income: MHI) by census tract.

Click graphic for larger view. Map developed using CV XE GIS.
Develop variations of this map view using the Mapping Minnesota Neighborhood Patterns GIS resources.

View additional selected details about the metro …
–  Component City Characteristics
–  Component County Characteristics
–  Economic Profile
–  Component School District Characteristics

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about this metro, comparing this metro to peer group metros and use of data analytics to develop further detail related to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

2015 Metropolitan Statistical Area Updates

.. new metropolitan statistical area designations are important; they identify transitioning and growing counties reaching a certain plateau of demographic-economic well-being. In July 2015, sixteen new Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs) were designated, reflecting population growth through 2014. At the same time one MISA changed status to a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) — Enid, OK. The five new Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs) reflect continuing urban agglomeration evolvement as contiguous metros grow and join adjacent metros. How will these new metros change by 2020? 2060? relate to others? See more detail in this related Web pages.

Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs — the collective set of MSAs and MISAs) designations are updated from periodically based on changing demographic-economic conditions. The July 2015 CBSA designations, summarized here, update the previous February 2013 CBSA designations. CBSAs are comprised of one or more contiguous counties. CBSA designations are made by OMB based primarily on Census Bureau data.

There are now 945 CBSAs (MSAs and MISAs) in the U.S. and Puerto Rico.
• 389 MSAs (382 in the United States and 7 in Puerto Rico).
  .. 11 MSAs contain a total of 31 Metropolitan Divisions (MDs).
• 556 MISAs (551 in the U.S. and 5 in Puerto Rico).
174 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs) now exist with a total of 537 component MSAs and MISAs.

Updates provided here are based on 2010 standards for delineating MSAs and MISAs. The updates reflect changes based on Census Bureau population estimates for July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2013.

The 2015 changes include:
• designation of a new metropolitan statistical area
• sixteen new micropolitan statistical areas
• five new combined statistical areas
• new components of existing combined statistical areas
• other changes

Examining Demographic Change for Metros & Components
In the list that follows, the MSA or MISA 5-digit geocode/geoid, uniquely identifying this metro/CBSA among all others, appears following the MSA or MISA name. Click county code link, following county name, to view a demographic trend profile. Click graphic below to view the illustrative profile for Garfield County, OK (Enid, OK MSA).

View county demographic change in context of other counties using this interactive table. View characteristics of principal cities in context of other cities using this interactive table.

New Metropolitan Statistical Area & County
Enid, OK MSA (21420) — previously a MISA that now qualifies as a new MSA
  Garfield County (40047)

New Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISA) & County Components
Alexander City, AL MISA (10760)
  Tallapoosa County (01123)
Atmore, AL MISA (12120)
  Escambia County (12033)
Bonham, TX MISA (14300)
  Fannin County (13111)
Brownsville, TN MISA (15140)
  Haywood County (47075)
Carroll, IA MISA (16140)
  Carroll County (19027)
Central City, KY MISA (16420)
  Muhlenberg County (21177)
Eufaula, AL-GA MISA (21640)
  Barbour County, AL (01005); Quitman County, GA (13239)
Fairmont, MN (21860 MISA)
  Martin County (27091)
Fort Payne, AL MISA (22840)
  DeKalb County (01049)
Grand Rapids, MN MISA (24330)
  Itasca County (27061)
Hope, AR MISA (26260)
  Hempstead County, (05057) Nevada County (05099)
Jennings, LA MISA (27660)
  Jefferson Davis Parish (22053)
Pella, IA MISA (37800)
  Marion County (19125)
Ruidoso, NM MISA (40760)
  Lincoln County (35027)
St. Marys, PA MISA (41260)
  Elk County (42047)
West Point, MS MISA (48500)
  Clay County (28025)

New Combined Statistical Areas (CSA) and Components
Columbus-West Point, MS CSA (200)
  Columbus, MS MISA
  West Point, MS MISA
Jackson-Brownsville, TN CSA (297)
  Brownsville, TN MISA
  Jackson, TN MSA
Lake Charles-Jennings, LA CSA (324)
  Jennings, LA MISA
  Lake Charles, LA MSA
Oskaloosa-Pella, lA CSA (423)
  Oskaloosa, lA MISA
  Pella, lA MISA
Pensacola-Ferry Pass, FL-AL CSA (426)
  Atmore, AL MISA
  Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, FL MSA

New Components of Existing Combined Statistical Areas (CSA)
  Alexander City, AL MISA added to Birmingham-Hoover-Talladega, AL CSA (142).
  Bonham, TX MISA added to Dallas-Fort Worth, TX-OK CSA (206).
  Fort Payne, AL MISA added to Huntsville-Decatur-Albertville, AL CSA (290).

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Examining K-12 Public School Characteristics; 2015 National Update

.. resources to analyze k-12 school characteristics and patterns … the U.S. national scope 2012-13 K-12 public schools dataset has just been updated (annual update). Wide-ranging characteristics of each school are now available for each of more than 102,000 schools. Use the interactive table on this Web page to view, rank, compare schools. Query for only those schools in a certain state or school district and then rank those schools on enrollment by grade, race/origin enrollment, free and reduced lunch fee participation, teachers and other subject matter.

Use the resources described here to knit together multi-sourced data to gain insights into patterns and infrastructure for the geography, population and schools of interest.

Schools in Context of Neighborhood Economic Prosperity
The following graphic shows schools in Mesa Unified, AZ (red markers) in context of median household income by census tract. The new school data are used in this application. More below about using this GIS project. Click graphic for larger view.

Ranking/Comparing Schools by Selected Area: Interactive Table
The following graphic shows schools in Mesa Unified, AZ ranked on total enrollment and showing enrollment by grade. Use the interactive table to select a district (or state, county, ZIP) of interest and examine its schools. The new school data (all U.S.) may be accessed via this interactive table. Click graphic for larger view.

Examining School Urban/Rural Patterns
The same school data accessible in the interactive table may also be used in corresponding GIS applications. The following graphic shows Mesa Unified (bold black boundary) in context of urban census blocks (orange fill pattern). Red Mountain High School (red box marker) is located at the pointer. The identify tool is used to display attributes of the school. Click graphic for larger view.

Schools may also be categorized as urban/rural using the locale code. See “School by Locale Code” layer in legend at left of the map. Different markers are used to represent different locale codes. Locale codes are further described in the K-12 schools section.

Using the Schools & Schools District GIS Project
Install the no fee Schools & Schools District GIS Project on your computer to examine statewide to neighborhood to individual school/school district characteristics. See more about installing and using the GIS resources used to develop map views shown above. Add other data, create alternative views, change marker styles, label schools/areas in different ways.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse, developer of the CV XE GIS software, is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is developer of the School District Special Tabulation under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Education. He also works with wide-ranging schools, school districts and state education agencies. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.