Tag Archives: school district demographics

School District Demographic Trends: 2010-2016

.. while enrollment in many school districts is growing, for many it is declining — these include some of the largest districts. Declining enrollment in school districts can result in school closings that destabilize neighborhoods, cause layoffs of essential staff and concerns that the students who remain are some of the neediest and most difficult to educate. See related narrative.

Based on total population, the largest 10 school districts in 2016 (see table below), all experienced an increase in population over the period 2010-2016. Five of these districts had a decrease in school age population (ages 5-17 years). Five of these districts had a decrease in the number of related children in poverty in families ages 5-17 years.

See the related Web section that provides tools to analyze annual demographic data for each U.S. school district for the period 2010 through 2016. This post summarizes selected details. These data include Census Bureau official 2016 estimates available for all districts. Developed for use as inputs for the ESEA Title I allocation formula, the data have broader uses of interest to school district demographics stakeholders. The 2016 estimates were released in November 2016; 2017 estimates become available in late 2018. ProximityOne uses these data in combination with other data to develop school district current estimates and annual projections through 2022 with related drill-down demographic-economic subject matter. Use the interactive table in the Web section to view, rank, compare demographic characteristics of districts of interest.

Largest 10 School Districts based on 2016 Population Age 5-17

Patterns of 2016 School Age Population in Poverty by School District
The graphic below shows school districts with total 2016 population of 1,000 or more by poverty incidence. Markers show the population ages 5-17 in families in poverty as a percent of population ages 5-17. Salmon markers: 40-50%. Red markers: 50% or more.

– view developed with CVGIS software and related GIS project.

School District Demographic Trends Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare demographic characteristics of districts of interest.

More About K-12 Education & Children’s Demographics
See the related section on School District Demographic Trends 2010-2016:
http://proximityone.com/sdtrends.htm.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on L

Largest School Districts Enrollment Characteristics

..  while school district enrollment is reported by school districts, only public school enrollment is reported. Public and private school enrollment are available by district from the American Community Survey (ACS 2015).  With few exceptions, school districts do not report on demographic-economic characteristics of the school district.  These data are only available from ACS. See the related interactive table to access and compare enrollment characteristics of school districts of interest.

In 2015, there were 1,016 school districts with total population of 65,000 or more (of total 14,650) for which “1-year estimates” were tabulated.  These estimates are based on respondent data for calendar year 2015.  This section summarizes selected enrollment characteristics of the largest districts and provides access to much more detail for each of these districts.

Largest 10 School Districts
The following graphic shows the largest 10 school districts based on the size of the 2015 school age population ages 5-to-17. Click graphic for larger view.

Mapping the Largest School Districts
The following graphic shows locations of the largest school districts as red markers. Click graphic for larger view that opens in a new window. Expand browser window for bets quality view. The larger view shows school district locations on context of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs).

  view created using CV XE GIS software and related GIS project.

School Districts Tabulated in ACS 2015
ACS 2015 data are tabulated for 14,650 school districts (among many other wide-ranging geography). The following table shows the number of districts for which 1-year estimates and 5-year estimates are tabulated. There are 1,016 districts for which 1-year estimates were tabulated.

These data show enrollment of residents of the district whether enrolled in that district or otherwise. Enrollment data are provided for preschool, K-12 and college and not enrolled.

Using the School District Enrollment Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table (click that link to use the table) showing enrollment in kindergarten by school district ranked in descending order.

– click graphic for larger view.

Using the table, you can select total, public or private enrollment for selected grade ranges.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining School District Demographic-Economic Patterns

.. the importance of understanding the demographic-economic make-up and trends for school districts can hardly be overstated. Community and educational challenges and opportunities are shaped by demographic-economic dynamics. Only by knowing “where we are” can we develop the most effective plans for improvement.

This section reviews tools, resources and methods that you can use to access, integrate and analyze demographic-economic data. The U.S. national scope ACS 2014 (released December 2015) School District Demographic-Economic Dataset contains approximately 600 subject matter items tabulated for each school district organized into four subject matter groups:
  • General Demographics
  • Social Characteristics
  • Economic Characteristics
  • Housing Characteristics
See similar interactive tables for: Census Tracts | ZIP Codes | State, Metro & County.

These data provide information and insights not available by examining data of students and schools alone — or any other data. See more about the importance of these data. Data are based on the American Community Survey (ACS)2014 5-year estimates for school districts defined as of the 2013-14 school year.

Patterns of Educational Attainment by School District
This view shows percent population 25 years and over with bachelor’s degree by school district; Texas and south central U.S. The thematic pattern shows item S067 shown in the interactive table. Click graphic for larger view, more detail and legend color/data intervals. This map illustrates the relative ease to gain insights into school district patterns using geospatial data analytics tools.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Using GIS software and project datasets, you can create zoom-in views, label geographic objects, add your own data, select different subject matter, change intervals/colors and perform a wide range of geospatial analyses.

Get a Custom Map for Your Area of Interest
Use this form to request a no fee map graphic similar to the one shown above for a state of interest. Enter the request with state name in the text section; e.g., “Requesting school district pattern map for Illinois.”

Using the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table in this related section to view, query, rank, compare social characteristics of the population among a set of school district — or view characteristics of a selected district.

The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table; click graphic for larger view. This view shows school districts in the Dallas, TX metro ranked in descending order on item S067 (Percent bachelor’s degree or higher). Highland Park ISD has the highest value of 83.1%.

Try it for a metro of interest — get metro 5-character code here. Go to the Social Characteristics table, then:
  • Click ShowAll button below table.
  • Click AvgHHSize… button below table.
  • Paste the 5-character metro code in the edit box to right of CBSA> button.
    … overwriting the value 19100.
  • Click the CBSA> button.
  • Click the S067 column header; click again to sort in other direction.
    … Done!

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about using school & school district geography and using demographic-economic data.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Comparing Census Tract Demographics Over Time

.. it’s about more than census tracts .. this section is about comparing American Community Survey ACS 5-year estimates: 2005-2009 with 2010-2014 … something new and powerful happening this week.

To make good business decisions we need hard data, recent data, trend data … to assess patterns and change and develop reliable, superior plans. Read about the past and then how things have changed for the better.

Imagine that it is 2005. Data from Census 2000 are now 5 years old. There will not be another update for richer demographics for all counties and cities in the foreseeable further. There will not be any update for small area geography such as census tracts or block groups until Census 2010. Businesses are forced to use out-of-date data to assess markets … where and how are opportunities changing? City and neighborhood planners can only make educated guesses to respond to growing needs of various population groups. Federal and state government programs that base funding allocations on demographics are challenged. Changes in the rental vacancy rates for most cities, counties and metros will remain unknown for the foreseeable future.

Fast forward to 2015 and present day reality. The situation is now radically different. First, we can now compare 5-year estimates from the 2009 American Community Survey ACS to those from the 2014 ACS 5 year estimates. Second, we will be able to do that again in 2016 — compare 5-year estimates from ACS 2010 to those from ACS 2015. Health planners can now assess the size and change in special needs population and how that matches up to resources that respond to those needs — rather than guessing. Schools and school districts can better understand how school age population trending and plan for enrollment change. Education agencies are better able to assess how changing demographics among school systems compare to one-another. Businesses can now determine the size of potential markets and how they are trending based on hard data. It is possible to compare changing patterns in rental vacancy rates and rental housing market conditions for all levels of geography down to block group.

The American Community Survey ACS provides a wide range of important statistics about people and housing for every community in the nation. These data are the only source of local estimates for most of the approximately 40 topics it covers for even the smallest communities. It produces statistics for ancestry, language, education, commuting, employment, mortgage status and rent, as well as income, poverty and health insurance. The ACS estimates are tabulated annually as 1-year estimates (e.g., the ACS 2014 1-year estimates) and 5-year estimates (e.g., the ACS 2014 5-year estimates. See a comparison below in this section about scope, advantages/disadvantages, and other usage attributes for the 1-year versus 5-year estimates.

See ACS 2014 5-year main page for additional data access & use details.

Data from the 5-year estimates are available for all geographies down to the block group level regardless of population size. Starting with the ACS 2014 5-year estimates, for the first time, users will be able to compare two non-overlapping five-year periods 2005-09 and 2010-14. Looking ahead, data from the 2006-10 and 2011-15 (available December 2016) will be comparable … and so on. Over several years, a time-series of 5-year estimates, non-overlapping five-year periods, will evolve.

Comparing Geography Between 2005-09 & 2010-14 ACS 5-Year Data
The following graphic summarizes geographic tabulation areas for 2005-09 and 2010-14 ACS 5-year data. Use the corresponding Web table as a reference guide for comparing data over time. Links provided in the table enable you to navigate to selected data access tables. This Web-page table updates with new links; bookmark the page for re-visits.

Updates
Posts later this month will provide updates on this topics; new data and new data analytics tools. Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss use of these data using analytical tools and methods applied to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Largest School Districts: Demographic-Economic Characteristics

.. examine demographic-economic characteristics for each/all of America’s largest school districts (population 65,000 or more).  Use the interactive table in this related Web section to query, rank compare the approximate 800 districts. Examine district relationships within peer groups using tools below table. Click a link in the table to view detailed characteristics of any district. Data are based on the annually updated American Community Survey (ACS 2013) estimates.

Largest School Districts (population 65,000 or more)

— view developed using CV XE GIS; click graphic for larger view

Using the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to query, rank compare district characteristics. The following graphic illustrates selecting districts having population 180,000 to 190,000. Select any population range. The 11 districts meeting the criteria are shown in the table. It is easy to see which districts are changing population and by how much. In the actual interactive table, click on a column header to sort on that item.

View Extended Demographic-Economic Profiles
In the interactive table, click the link in the school district row to view an extended demographic-economic profile for the district. The extended demographic-economic profile shows characteristics of the district based on Census 2010, ACS 2012 1-year estimates and ACS 2013 1-year estimates. Similarly structured profiles are available for sub-district geography and county, city and higher level geography. See about these profiles for other types of geographic areas.

The following graphic shows a partial view of the demographic-economic profile available for any district.

Use the interactive table to access profiles for districts of interest. Search for the district partial spelling of name using the Find in Name button below the table; or sort by name and scroll to that district.

This section updates in the fall 2015 with ACS 2014 demographic-economic data.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Demographic-Economic Patterns: Composite & Related Geography

.. we often need data for study areas that do not conform to conventional political/statistical geography. The geography for a market, sales territory, impact zone or other type of study area often do not align with political or statistical geographic areas for which relevant demographic-economic data are available. While the interest might be in demographic-economic characteristics for a particular county, patterns and trends within a county cab vary widely for sub-county geography such as ZIP code areas, census tracts, cities, school districts and other types of geography. It is important to be able to examine the composite, or drill-down, geography for a larger area. Related geography are equally important. Even though primary interest might be in three ZIP code areas, knowing about patterns in related, contiguous ZIP codes is also important. This section illustrates how to examine semi-comprehensive demographic-economic characteristics and trends using organized profiles for alternative geography.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Neighborhood
ZIP Code Area 60565
in Naperville, IL area — bold black boundary

– note this ZIP code area intersects with many census tracts;
    … in many cases tract boundaries are not coterminous with ZIP code.
– colors show patterns of median household income by census tract
– view developed with CV XE GIS … view full profile

More information — get for your areas anywhere in U.S.

Illustrative set of different types of geography; Naperville, IL; Chicago metro.
Click links to view full profile.
ZIP Code Area 60565 — Naperville, IL area — see graphic above
Census Tract 17197880119 — Naperville, IL area — see graphic below
Naperville city, IL — see graphic below
Naperville School District, IL — see graphic below
DuPage County, IL — see graphic below

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Neighborhood
Census tract 17197880119
in Naperville, IL area — bold black boundary

– ZIP code 60565 shown with red boundary.
– colors show patterns of median household income by census tract
– view developed with CV XE GIS … view full profile

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Neighborhood
Naperville, IL city
— cross-hatched pattern, bold black boundary

– colors show patterns of median household income by census tract
– view developed with CV XE GIS … view full profile

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Neighborhood
Naperville School District, IL
— cross-hatched pattern, bold black boundary

– Naperville city shown with semi-transparent cross-hatch pattern.
– colors show patterns of median household income by census tract
– view developed with CV XE GIS … view full profile

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Neighborhood
DuPage County, IL
— cross-hatched pattern, bold black boundary

– Naperville city shown with semi-transparent cross-hatch pattern.
– colors show patterns of median household income by census tract
– view developed with CV XE GIS … view full profile

There are many other ways to use composite and related geography in data analytics. GIS tools enable wide-ranging geospatial analysis not covered in detail here. See more about this topic in the data analytics program.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.