Tag Archives: population estimates

Examining County Migration: 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine U.S. by county migration 2010 to 2016 … is the population moving away or into your counties of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

The total net international migration among all counties 7/1/2010 – 7/1/2016 was 5,641,260, an annual average of 940,432. The sum of net domestic migration among counties is zero by definition, but domestic migration among counties varies radically by size and direction. This section is focused on U.S. by county migration from 2010 to 2016. Migration is one component of change used to develop population estimates. See more about county population estimates and components of change in this related Web section.

Largest 10 Counties Based on 2016 Population
This table shows how domestic migration varies widely among the most populated counties. Use this interactive table to develop your own custom views for counties of interest.

Patterns of Population Change by County, 2010-2016
– the role and impact of migration
The following graphic shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2016. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Examining Population Components of Change
– net migration and natural change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

Using the Interactive Table
– examining migration by county
Use the interactive table to examine characters of counties by states, metro or peer group. The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to view net migration for the Houston metro by county. The net migration button was used to select only the net migration columns, FindCBSA button used to show only counties in this metro and the final step was to sort the resulting table on 2016 population. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State Population & Components of Change: 2010-2016

.. data and tools to examine how state demographics are changing 2010-2016 … using the new 2016 population and components of changes estimates. The U.S. population changed from 308,758,105 (2010) to 323,127,513 (2016), a change of 14,369,408 (4.7%). Only three states lost population. See the growth rates for DC and the remaining states in this table. Highest growth rates were in D.C., North Dakota, Texas, Utah and Colorado.

Patterns of Population Change, 2010-2016, by State
The following graphic shows the percent population change by state with labels showing the rank among all states based on the percent change in population, 2010-16.

View created with CVGIS and related GIS project. Click graphic for larger view.

Resources to Analyze these Data
Use our tools to view and analyze annual population estimates, 2010 to 2016, rankings and components of change for the U.S., regions and states. Use the interactive table below in this section to view, rank, compare these data. Use the GIS tools and ready-to use project described below in this section to create maps for states and regions of interest. Create thematic maps for any of the fields/measures shown in the interactive table. Change color patterns and labels. Integrate your own data.

Using Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query states based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

The graphic shows the largest 10 states ranked in descending order based on 2016 population. The column “PopChg Rank 10b16” (second from right) shows the rank of this state, among all states, based on the population change from 2010 to 2016. The rightmost column shows the state’s rank for the period based on percent change in population over the period.

Largest 10 States based on 2016 Population

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine state patterns and characteristics based on your selected criteria.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Largest School Districts Enrollment Characteristics

..  while school district enrollment is reported by school districts, only public school enrollment is reported. Public and private school enrollment are available by district from the American Community Survey (ACS 2015).  With few exceptions, school districts do not report on demographic-economic characteristics of the school district.  These data are only available from ACS. See the related interactive table to access and compare enrollment characteristics of school districts of interest.

In 2015, there were 1,016 school districts with total population of 65,000 or more (of total 14,650) for which “1-year estimates” were tabulated.  These estimates are based on respondent data for calendar year 2015.  This section summarizes selected enrollment characteristics of the largest districts and provides access to much more detail for each of these districts.

Largest 10 School Districts
The following graphic shows the largest 10 school districts based on the size of the 2015 school age population ages 5-to-17. Click graphic for larger view.

Mapping the Largest School Districts
The following graphic shows locations of the largest school districts as red markers. Click graphic for larger view that opens in a new window. Expand browser window for bets quality view. The larger view shows school district locations on context of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs).

  view created using CV XE GIS software and related GIS project.

School Districts Tabulated in ACS 2015
ACS 2015 data are tabulated for 14,650 school districts (among many other wide-ranging geography). The following table shows the number of districts for which 1-year estimates and 5-year estimates are tabulated. There are 1,016 districts for which 1-year estimates were tabulated.

These data show enrollment of residents of the district whether enrolled in that district or otherwise. Enrollment data are provided for preschool, K-12 and college and not enrolled.

Using the School District Enrollment Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table (click that link to use the table) showing enrollment in kindergarten by school district ranked in descending order.

– click graphic for larger view.

Using the table, you can select total, public or private enrollment for selected grade ranges.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Population by Age, Gender & Race/Origin 2010-2015

.. tools to examine characteristics and patterns of U.S. & state population by age, gender & race/origin, 2010-2015 annually .. access individual state and area profiles.

What are the 10 states with the largest Hispanic population? How is Hispanic population distributed by age in the U.S. or any particular state? In which states does the Hispanic population comprise more than half of the total population? And by age? Get answers to these types of questions using data access and analytical tools described in this section.

Using the Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table. Tools are used to select only 2015 and show only the total and Hispanic columns, then rank in descending order on Hispanic population. It is easy to see which states have the largest Hispanic population and in relation to the total population.

Tip of the Iceberg
It’s not just about Hispanic and total population; perform similar queries/analyses by gender and for each of the five major race groups. These data are based on the latest Census Bureau 2015 model-based population estimates released in June 2016. The data options are not limited to the 2015 data; annual revised data for 2010 through 2015 are included. Find out about the size and trends for specific age groups of interest.

More about the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to perform other types of queries/analyses described above. Click a link in the table to view an extended profile for each area. The profiles are developed using the Regional Demographic-Economic Modeling System (RDEMS). When a profile is opened (new web page), analyze these population by age by gender by race/origin in context of related wide-ranging, multi-sourced data. Access the profiles for drill-down geography including counties and other areas.

Use the RDEMS current estimates (2016) and annual 5-year projections (to 2021) to examine this same scope of subject matter to the county level.

The interactive table includes a row for the U.S. and each state. Column structure and content are described below the table.
• Click the “link” (column 3) to view the RDEMS POP1 profile.
• See about more operations and usage notes below table.

Viewing Extended Profile for an Area
Clicking the link for Arizona, as illustrated above, shows the full “POP1” table/profile for Arizona. Clicking the link is equivalent to clicking this link: http://proximityone.com/rdems/1/rdems04000pop1.htm.
  • click the above link now to view the full profile.
  • California profile
  • Texas profile
  • Access any state using the interactive table

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Using ACS County Data

… we are always seeking the most current data for areas of interest. This section provides an update on accessing unpublished ACS 1-year data for many counties.  Learn about how you can access ACS 1-year estimates for 85 counties for which Census released only as 5-year estimates … and why it matters. See the corresponding full Web section.

Data are tabulated from the Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) as 1-year estimates (for areas with population 65,000 and over) and as 5-year estimates (for areas under 65,000 population). See more about ACS 1-year versus 5-year estimates in this section.

ACS 2014 1-year tabulation areas, as released by the Census Bureau included 817 of 3142 counties and 508 of 917 metros/CBSAs. There are 85 counties for which ACS 2914 1-year estimates were not released by Census but are derivable by subtracting the aggregate county components from metro totals in selected metros.

County & Metro ACS 2014 1-year Estimates
The following graphic shows Texas and adjacent areas:
• ACS 2014 1-year estimates metros with bold brown boundaries
• Counties for which ACS 2014 1-year data were tabulated and released (green).
• Counties for which ACS 2014 1-year data are derivable but not released as tabulation areas (blue).

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click map for larger view and details.

The next view shows a zoom-in to the Austin, TX metro. The four green shaded counties had ACS 2014 1-year estimates tabulated and released. The fifth Austin metro county, Caldwell shaded blue, was not tabulated but the ACS 1-year data are derivable by subtracting the sum of the four counties from the metro totals. Tabulated data for Caldwell was released only as ACS 2014 5-year estimates. A similar situation exists in many metros across the country.

Why this Matters
There are 85 counties for which ACS 2014 1 year data are available but not released/made available by Census as separately tabulated areas. This is important due to these considerations:
• these are true annual estimates (as opposed to the other 5-year estimated counties)
• they are more recent that 5-year estimates
• they reflect conditions centric to one year
• they enable time series/trend analysis
• [as it turns out] they enable access to 1 year estimates for all counties (instead of some) in some metros

Using API Tools to Examine these Data
Create CSV-like files by clicking these links. When a link is clicked a new page will show the ACS 2014 1-year estimates tabulations areas. The area name, code and ACS 2014 1-year total population estimate is shown.
Click to retrieve county data
Click to retrieve metro data

Items used in these API calls:
.. B01001_001E – Total population
.. B19013_001E – Median household income ($)
.. B19113_001E – Median family income ($)
.. B19301_001E – Per capita income

Create/derive these data on your own; learn about which counties are derivable …

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

 

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Combined Statistical Areas Demographic Trends

.. Combined Statistical Areas are aggregates of adjacent metropolitan areas; they are groups of contiguous counties that have demographic-economic affinity. These 166 areas are important in market research and development for several reasons. Based on the 2015 population estimate, these areas include 244.1 million population of the total U.S. population of 321.4 million (76 percent). CSAs are at least two adjacent metropolitan areas — reflecting a larger and broader market area. Due to their size (of many), it is often possible to develop more detailed custom demographic-economic estimates and projections than at the county or metropolitan area level. See more below about CSA definitions and relation to other geography.

25 Largest CSAs based on 2015 Total Population
The following graphic shows the largest 25 CSAs based on the latest 2015 official population estimates. The intervals/colors are depicted in legend panel at left of map window. Create custom maps similar to this view for your regions of interest. Use the GIS project/datasets to examine alternative patterns such as percent change for different time periods. Set queries to include CSAs by peer group. Click graphic for larger view with more detail; expand browser window for best quality view.

View developed with CV XE GIS software using the us1.gis GIS project.

View all Combined Statistical Areas

This section provides an overview of recent demographic trends among CSAs and provides access to tools to further examine these areas, markets, and demographic-economic-business related characteristics. Use the interactive table below to examine patterns and relationships among CSAs of interest. Use the GIS project and datasets described below to examine CSAs in a mapping and geospatial analysis context.

As an example, the Houston CSA is comprised of the Houston MSA and four adjacent MISAs — Bay City, Brenham, El Campo and Huntsville — four relatively small metros. Compare this to the Los Angeles CSA — the “old 5-county LA metro” — comprised of three adjacent MSAs — Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura and Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario. The Los Angeles CSA is the second largest CSA (based on population) and more than twice the size of the 3rd largest CSA — Chicago. Use the interactive table below to examine relationships among CSAs. Click the ShowAll button then the CSA Only button to rank/compare CSAs. Click the ShowAll button then select the CSA by code button to examine the metro and county components of a specific CSA of interest.

Analyze CSA Demographic Patterns using GIS Tools
View maps for your areas of interest. Add other geography/subject matter. Modify content, color settings, labeling and other attributes. See details about installing and getting started in this section.

Population by Combined Statistical Area: 2010-2015
— Using the Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates using the interactive table to view a list of the largest 10 CSAs ranked on 2015 total population.
Click graphic for larger view. Use the interactive table to examine CSAs of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.