Tag Archives: pattern analysis

Block Group Demographic Data Analytics

.. use tools described here to access block group data from ACS 2016 (or ACS2017 in December 2018) using a no cost, menu driven tool accessing the data via API. Select from any of the summary statistic data. Save results as an Excel file or shapefile. Add the shapefile to a GIS project and create unlimited thematic pattern views. Add your own data. Join us in a Data Analytics Web session where use of the tool with the ACS 2017 data is reviewed.

See related Web section for more details.
– examine neighborhoods, market areas and sales territories.
– assess demographics of health service areas.
– create maps for visual/geospatial analysis of locations & demographics.

Illustration of Block Group Thematic Pattern Map – make for any area

– click graphic to view larger view
– pointer (top right) shows location of Amazon HQ2

Topics in this how-to guide (links open new sections/pages)
• 01 Objective Thematic Pattern Map View
• 02 Install the CV XE GIS software
• 03 Access/Download the Block Group Demographic-Economic Data
• 04 Download the State by Block Group Shapefile
• 05 Merge Extracted Data (from 03) into Shapefile (04)
• 06 Add Shapefile to the GIS Project; Set Intervals
• 07 Viewing Profile for Selected Block Group
• 08 BG Demographics Spreadsheet
• 09 Block Group Demographics GIS Project
• 10 Why Block Group Demographics are Important

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Location-Based Demographics Update

.. tools you can use to examine characteristics of addresses/locations .. many of us are interested in knowing attributes of addresses or locations. Often knowing address latitude-longitude is important so that the addresses can be viewed on a map .. see below.  Some might need to know what census block, or other geography, in which an address is located .. or what school district is an address located in.  Others need to know demographic-economic attributes of the neighborhood or area where an address is located.  These types of attributes can be obtained for addresses using the Location-Based Demographic (LBD) tools.  The LBD tool has just been made a part of the CV XE GIS software.  The LBD tool is available in all versions of CV XE GIS, including the no fee User Group version. See more about using the LBD tools to look-up and analyze address/location attributes.

Viewing Geocoded Addresses on a Map – automatically
The following view shows addresses geocoded using the LBD tool. Markers show addresses of 27 Trader Joe’s locations in the Los Angeles area. LBD automatically creates a shapefile that is added to your GIS project. The markers are labeled with population ages 18 and over in the corresponding census tract. Marker color/styles reflect different levels of median household income. A separate census tract layer shows patterns of economic prosperity.

Click graphic for larger view. Expand browser window. A mini profile is displayed showing demographic-economic attributes for the marker at pointer.

View the locations without the tract thematic pattern layer:

Make similar views for your addresses.

Get Started Using the LBD Tool
1 – join the User Group .. click here to join (no fee).
2 – run the installer to install on a Windows machine .. requires your userid.
3 – with CV XE GIS running, click Tools>Find Address/LBD
    enter an address .. a form appears showing characteristics of the address.
4 – see more about using the tools on the LDB page.

GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning Sessions
We are developing a series of “GeoStatistical Data Analytics” (GSDA) Learning Sessions/modules. One of these is focused on using the LBD tools and methods in the broader context of data analytics. We plan to develop the GSDA models for self-guided use by analysts/practitioners as well as in the classroom setting with teacher/student materials. Upcoming blog posts will describe the program in more detail.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Web Session, every Tuesday, where we review access to and use of data, tools and methods relating to GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning. We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

TractWatch — Examining Small Area Change

Understanding the demographic-economic landscape for small area geography and how it is changing is vital for many stakeholders. Businesses and other organizations need to know how their market/service areas are changing … getting answers to questions like knowing about recent trends, where we are now and the how/where/how much things might change in the future.

Examining Tract Change
The following view shows census tracts (black boundary) located in the northeast Houston, TX area. Tracts are labeled with 2017 population estimates and percent population change from 2010 to 2017. Tract geography and characteristics are shown in context of three cities/places — Houston (orange cross-hatch), Humble (blue) and Atascocita CDP (green). It is easy to see what census tracts intersect with what cities and where. The pointer/hand is located in census tract 48-201-240902, partly intersecting with Humble city. The tract 2017 population of 12,984 reflects an increase of 10.4% since 2010. The dark brown bold boundary at the top of this tract is the Harris County, TX boundary.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. create views like this for any area in the U.S.; add your own data.

TractWatch tells us which tracts in a region of interest changed during the past year based on quarterly observable data with only a one quarter lag.

Census Tracts & TractWatch
TractWatch is a new tool/service focused on examining recent demographic-business change for each census tract. These approximate 74,000 geographic areas cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and averaged 4,000 population as of Census 2010. Tracts have a generally stable geography between decennial censuses and are coterminous with county boundaries. Tracts cover the U.S. with more than a 2-to-1 ratio compared to ZIP code areas (see tract-ZIP relationship table).

Integrated with Situation & Outlook
TractWatch insights are developed through the use of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook (S&O) database and information system — a part of S&O demographic-economic estimates and projections developed and updated annually. The 2017 vintage tract estimates and projections (annual data) cover the period 2010 through 2022 (5-year projection).

TractWatch – Monitoring Change
As a part of the S&O annual estimates and projections development, a range of measures are updated quarterly at the census tract level. Quarterly data are developed that include population, housing units, vacant units, households and business establishments.

There is only a one-quarter lag in the availability of observable census tract data. For example, observable 2017Q1 data can be added to the S&O database in July 2017. Data are analyzed and converted into a TractWatch national dataset.

Situation & Outlook Reports
The Situation & Outlook Reports (S&O Reports) are updated weekly, for the U.S. and each county, metro and state. TractWatch is a part of the “Recent Change and Outlook” S&O Report section and updated quarterly. See schedule of updates the shows when TractWatch is updated.

The S&O Reports (metro and county) Recent Change and Outlook section includes a list of census tracts which have shown significant change over the past year for that geography. A table of typically 10-to-25 key tracts are listed in a table with selected demographic-business change attributes.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Tools to Analyze County Demographic-Economic Characteristics

.. demographic-economic characteristics of counties are essential for business development, market analysis, planning, economic development, program management and general awareness of patterns and trends. This section provides access to data and tools to examine these data for all counties in the U.S. This annual update includes geographic area characteristics based on ACS 2015 data.  The tools/data are organized into four related sections summarized below.

1. General Demographics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp1.htm
Patterns of School Age Population by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county general demographics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns of percent population ages 5 to 17 years of age by county — item D001-D004-D018 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

2. Social Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp2.htm 
Patterns of Educational Attainment by County
– percent college graduate
Use GIS tools to visually examine county social characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns of percent college graduate by county — item S067 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

3. Economic Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp3.htm 
Patterns of Median Household Income by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county economic characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns median household income by county — item E062 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

4. Housing Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp4.htm 
Patterns of Median Housing Value by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county housing characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns median housing value by county — item E062 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Personal Consumption Expenditures by State: Updates & Pattern Analysis

.. data and tools to develop insights into personal consumption patterns by state .. growth in state personal consumption expenditures (PCE) – the measure of goods and services purchased by or on behalf of households – decelerated to 3.6 percent on average in 2015 from 4.4 percent in 2014. In 2015, PCE growth ranged from 1.5 percent in Wyoming to 5.0 percent in Florida. PCE by state data for 16 expenditure categories are shown for the U.S. and by state in the interactive table. See related Web section for more detail.

Per Capita Personal Consumption Expenditures
  — Patterns & Characteristics by State

The following graphic shows patterns of percent change in total PCE 2010-2015 by state labeled with 2015 per capita total PCE. Use CVGIS project to examine PCE by types and different years. Integrate additional subject matter and types of geography. Click graphic for larger view with details.

– views developed with CVGIS and related GIS project & datasets.

In 2015, the fastest growing categories of expenditures across all states were food services and accommodations, health care and other nondurable goods. These categories along with housing and utilities were also the largest contributors to growth in total PCE by state.

Per capita PCE by state measures average PCE spending per person in a state. Across all states, per capita total PCE was $38,196. Per capita PCE by state ranged from a high of $49,717 in Massachusetts to a low of $29,330 in Mississippi.

Personal Consumption Expenditure by Category
PCE by state is the state counterpart of the Nation’s personal consumption expenditures (PCE). PCE by state measures the goods and services purchased by or on behalf of households and the net expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households (NPISHs) by state of residence for all states and DC. PCE by state reflects spending on activities that are attributable to the residents of a state, even when those activities take place outside of the state. Per capita PCE by state measures average PCE spending per person in a state.

Interactive Analysis
The following two graphics illustrate use of the interactive PCE table. View 1 shows Texas by PCE type ranked in ascending order on percent change from 2010 to 2015 (ranked on far right column). View 2 shows Texas by PCE type ranked in descending order on percent change from 2010 to 2015 (ranked on far right column). Use the table to examine characteristics of states of interest. Click graphic for larger view.

Texas by PCE Type; Ranked Ascending on PCPCE Change 2010-15

Texas by PCE Type; Ranked Descending on PCPCE Change 2010-15

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Mapping Statistical Data with R

The world of visual and geospatial analysis continues to morph and evolve. So it is with R’s geospatial analysis evolvement. This section is focused on mapping statistical data with R and provides steps you can use to develop Web-based interactive maps in complete HTML structure ready to publish. No coding.

R (more about R) is an open source language and environment for statistical computing and graphics. R has many similarities with the Statistical Analysis System (SAS), but is free … and widely used by an ever increasing user base. R is used throughout the ProximityOne Certificate in Data Analytics course.

For now, in the areas of mapping and geospatial analysis, R is best used in a companion role with Geographic Information System (GIS) software like CV XE GIS. Maybe it will always be that way. R’s features to 1) perform wide-ranging statistical analysis operations and 2) to process and manage shapefiles and relate those and other data to many, many types of data structures are among R’s key strengths.

Mapping with R
The graphic shown below illustrates a Web-based interactive map that has been developed totally using R. The map shows patterns of Census 2010 population for Texas by county. Aside from satellite imagery, which can be added, this application provides the look and feel of a Google maps application. Yet the steps to develop the application are far different and much closer to more traditional GIS software and data structures .. and there are no proprietary constraints. Join us in weekly Data Analytics Lab sessions to learn about developing this type of mapping application and geospatial analysis. See more about this application in narrative below the map.

Create & Publish this Interactive Map or Variation
  … no coding .. see details in Web version of this post.

Click graphic for larger view and details — opens new window with interactive map.. View developed using R.

R generates the final product HTML as shown above. This application illustrates use of a Census countyTIGER/Line shapefile integrated with Census 2010 demographics. Participants in the ProximityOne Data Analytics course learn how to develop the types of maps using a range of TIGER/Line shapefiles from census block to metro to congressional district to state and integrating subject matter from the American Community Survey and many other Federal statistical programs. R and the ProximityOne CV XE GIS tools work together to expand the range of analytics to an unlimited set of possibilities.

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about using R for mapping, data management and statistical analysis in context of data analytics.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Importance of Census Tracts in Data Analytics

census tracts are important for many reasons. It is easy to misidentify or misunderstand patterns and characteristics within cities, counties and metros which become obfuscated using these higher level, more aggregate, geographies. Many cities and counties that might be experiencing demographic-economic decline will often have bright spots that are groups of a few or many census tracts.

Patterns of Percent Population with Bachelor’s Degree
— by Census Tract; Los Angeles Metro
The following graphic shows percent population age 25 years and over with bachelor’s degree by census tract based on ACS 2014 5 year estimates for a portion of the Los Angeles metro. Accommodating different demographic-economic thresholds/patterns, different legend color/data intervals are used. The pattern layer is set to 80% transparency enabling a view of earth features. Click graphic for larger view, more detail and legend color/data intervals. This map illustrates the geographic level of detail available using census tract demographics and the relative ease to gain insights using geospatial data analytics tools.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Get a Custom Map for Your Area of Interest
Use this form to request a no fee map graphic similar to the one shown above for a county of interest. Enter the request with county name and state in the text section; e.g., “Requesting social characteristics tract map for Cook County, IL.”

This section reviews reasons for the importance of census tracts in data analyyics. See related Web sections on tools, resources and methods that you can use to access, integrate and analyze U.S. by census tract general demographics data. The U.S. national scope Census Tracts Demographic-Economic Dataset contains approximately 600 subject matter items tabulated for each census tract organized into four subject matter groups:
General Demographics
Social Characteristics
Economic Characteristics
Housing Characteristics

Importance of Census Tracts for Data Analytics
Census tracts are important for many reasons.  A partial list of reasons is provided below.
• Covering the U.S. wall-to-wall, census tracts are the preferred “small area” geography for superior data analytics.
• The Census Bureau now produces annual tract demographic-economic data from the American Community Survey;  there is an evolving time-series at the tract level creating new analytical opportunities.
• Originally developed to equivalence neighborhoods, many still do.
• Defined by the Census Bureau in collaboration with local groups, tracts typically reflect boundaries meaningful for local area analysis.
• Defined generally for use with each new decennial census, most tract boundaries are stable and non-changing for ten years and many much longer.
• Designed to average 4,000 population, there are more than twice as many census tracts (73,056) than ZIP code areas (33,129).
• Tract boundaries are well-defined; unlike ZIP code areas which are subject to multi-sourced geographic definitions.
• Many data developers (e.g., epidemiologists) use census tract geography to tabulate their own small area data enabling more effective use of those data with Census Bureau census tract data.
• As a statistical geographic area (in contrast to politically defined areas, census tracts are coterminous with counties; data at the census tract level can be aggregated to the county level.
• Small area estimates for tracts are typically more reliable than for block groups.
.. census tracts are comprised on one or more coterminous block groups.
.. on average, a census tract is comprised of three block groups.
• Census tracts are used by many Federal, state and local governments for compliance and program management.

The annually updated American Community Survey provides “richer” demographic-economic characteristics for national scope census tracts. While Census 2010 provides data similar to those items in the General Demographics section, only ACS sourced data provide details on topics such as income and poverty, labor force and employment, housing value and costs, educational participation and attainment, language spoken at home, among many related items. The approximate 600 items accessible via the tract dataset are supplemented by a wide range of additional subject matter. ACS census tract data are updated annually in December of each year.

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about using census tract geography and demographic-economic data.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.