Tag Archives: Metros

Metro Population & Components of Change Trends 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine how the U.S. by metro population is changing. Is the population moving away or into metros of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

This section provides information on how and why the population is changing by metro from 2010 to 2016 in terms of components of change: births, deaths and migration. It provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by metro using latest Census Bureau estimates through 2016. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual demographic-economic projections.  See related Web page to access full interactive table and more detail.

Patterns of Population Change by Metro, 2010-2016
The following graphic shows how metros (MSAs – Metropolitan Statisticsl Areas) changed from 2010 to 2016 based on percent population change. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Narrative Analysis of Metro Demographic Change in Context
A narrative summary and analysis of metro demographic characteristics and change, contextually with other data and geography, is provided for each metro in the Situation & Outlook Reports. See more about the wide-ranging subject matter that are knitted together in the schedule of updates. Examine metro dynamics in context of the U.S. overall and related states and counties.

The nation’s 382 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) had a population of 277.1 million in 2016 (86% of the total population). MSAs increased by 2.3 million people from 2015. The nation’s 551 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs) had a population of 27.7 million in 2016 (9% of the total population). MISAs increased by 16,000 people from 2015. See more highlights below

MSAs and MISAs together, or metro areas, comprised the set of Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs). Each metro/CBSA is defined as a set of one or more contiguous counties.

Related Sections
• Metros Main
• Situation & Outlook Reports
• City/Place Population Trends
• County Population Trends
• County Population Projections to 2060
• ProximityOne Data Service

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

See more about these topics below:
• Natural Increase/Change; birth & deaths
• Migration; net international, net domestic, net migration

Using the Interactive Table – Peer Group Analysis
Use the full interactive table to examine U.S. national scope metros by population and components of change. Consider an application where you want to study metros having a 2016 population between 250,000 and 300,000. Use the tools below the interactive table to select these metros as illustrated in the graphic shown below. The graphic shows these metros ranked on the overall U.S. metro rank (percent population change 2010-2016). As shown in the graphic, the Greeley, CO metro was ranked 11th among all metros and the fastest growing metro in this group. Use the tools/buttons below the table to create custom views.

Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metro by Metro: What $100 Buys

.. data and tools to examine the purchasing power of the incomes in different metros and states … this section reviews how you can access to data on what $100 buys by state and metro. Examine patterns of what $100 buys by year, 2008-2014, for all items and by type of goods & services category. Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare the Buying Power Index for each/all states and metros (MSAs). See the main Web page for more details.

What $100 Buys by Metro: 2014
The following graphic shows patterns of 2014 all items buying power of $100 by metro (MSAs). The color patterns/intervals are shown in the inset legend. Click graphic for larger view. Expand browser to full window for best quality view. Use GIS tools to develop thematic pattern maps for a range of data and criteria.

.. view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
.. click map for larger view and details.

Varying prices by region can be normalized using Regional Price Parities (RPP). The RPP is a weighted average of the price level of goods and services for the average consumer in one geographic region compared to all other regions in the U.S. See more about RPP measures. Using the RPP data, what $100 will buy can be determined by state and metro for the categories of all goods and services, goods, services-rents and other services. See about RPP goods and services types.

In the Boston metro, $100 buys about 90.7 percent of all items goods and services due to the high prices there. $100 in Boston seems more like $90.70 compared to the national average. In the Jefferson City, MO metro, the opposite is true. $100 buys all items goods and services due to lower prices in that metro. $100 in the Jefferson City, MO metro is the equivalent of $121.65 of all items goods and services compared to the national price levels.
• the Boston metro all items buying power index is 90.70
• the Jefferson City, MO metro all items buying power index is 121.65

Interactive Table – Top 10 Metros
The following graphic illustrates use of the Buying Power Index interactive table. This graphic shows the 10 metros that have the all items highest Buying Power Index. Use the interactive table to view/examine areas of interest.

– click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining School District Demographic-Economic Patterns

.. the importance of understanding the demographic-economic make-up and trends for school districts can hardly be overstated. Community and educational challenges and opportunities are shaped by demographic-economic dynamics. Only by knowing “where we are” can we develop the most effective plans for improvement.

This section reviews tools, resources and methods that you can use to access, integrate and analyze demographic-economic data. The U.S. national scope ACS 2014 (released December 2015) School District Demographic-Economic Dataset contains approximately 600 subject matter items tabulated for each school district organized into four subject matter groups:
  • General Demographics
  • Social Characteristics
  • Economic Characteristics
  • Housing Characteristics
See similar interactive tables for: Census Tracts | ZIP Codes | State, Metro & County.

These data provide information and insights not available by examining data of students and schools alone — or any other data. See more about the importance of these data. Data are based on the American Community Survey (ACS)2014 5-year estimates for school districts defined as of the 2013-14 school year.

Patterns of Educational Attainment by School District
This view shows percent population 25 years and over with bachelor’s degree by school district; Texas and south central U.S. The thematic pattern shows item S067 shown in the interactive table. Click graphic for larger view, more detail and legend color/data intervals. This map illustrates the relative ease to gain insights into school district patterns using geospatial data analytics tools.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Using GIS software and project datasets, you can create zoom-in views, label geographic objects, add your own data, select different subject matter, change intervals/colors and perform a wide range of geospatial analyses.

Get a Custom Map for Your Area of Interest
Use this form to request a no fee map graphic similar to the one shown above for a state of interest. Enter the request with state name in the text section; e.g., “Requesting school district pattern map for Illinois.”

Using the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table in this related section to view, query, rank, compare social characteristics of the population among a set of school district — or view characteristics of a selected district.

The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table; click graphic for larger view. This view shows school districts in the Dallas, TX metro ranked in descending order on item S067 (Percent bachelor’s degree or higher). Highland Park ISD has the highest value of 83.1%.

Try it for a metro of interest — get metro 5-character code here. Go to the Social Characteristics table, then:
  • Click ShowAll button below table.
  • Click AvgHHSize… button below table.
  • Paste the 5-character metro code in the edit box to right of CBSA> button.
    … overwriting the value 19100.
  • Click the CBSA> button.
  • Click the S067 column header; click again to sort in other direction.
    … Done!

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about using school & school district geography and using demographic-economic data.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.