Tag Archives: domestic migration

State Population & Components of Change: 2010-2016

.. data and tools to examine how state demographics are changing 2010-2016 … using the new 2016 population and components of changes estimates. The U.S. population changed from 308,758,105 (2010) to 323,127,513 (2016), a change of 14,369,408 (4.7%). Only three states lost population. See the growth rates for DC and the remaining states in this table. Highest growth rates were in D.C., North Dakota, Texas, Utah and Colorado.

Patterns of Population Change, 2010-2016, by State
The following graphic shows the percent population change by state with labels showing the rank among all states based on the percent change in population, 2010-16.

View created with CVGIS and related GIS project. Click graphic for larger view.

Resources to Analyze these Data
Use our tools to view and analyze annual population estimates, 2010 to 2016, rankings and components of change for the U.S., regions and states. Use the interactive table below in this section to view, rank, compare these data. Use the GIS tools and ready-to use project described below in this section to create maps for states and regions of interest. Create thematic maps for any of the fields/measures shown in the interactive table. Change color patterns and labels. Integrate your own data.

Using Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query states based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

The graphic shows the largest 10 states ranked in descending order based on 2016 population. The column “PopChg Rank 10b16” (second from right) shows the rank of this state, among all states, based on the population change from 2010 to 2016. The rightmost column shows the state’s rank for the period based on percent change in population over the period.

Largest 10 States based on 2016 Population

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine state patterns and characteristics based on your selected criteria.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State of the States: 2010-2015

.. examining the how, why and where of population change by state from 2010 to 2015. This section provides an overview of this topic and provides a summary of tools, interactive table and GIS project, to analyze population change by state by county, using latest Census Bureau estimates data through 2015. These data are used by ProximityOne to develop/update annual national state and county demographic-economic projections. See schedule of related 2016 updates. See more about development of these data/reports below.

Updates … see related State and Regional Decision-Making Information section … frequently updated state-by-state pages.

Patterns of Net Migration by State, 2010-2015
The following graphic shows patterns of state net migration during 2010 to 2015. 14 states experienced negative net migration. See in table below. States are labeled with net migration 2010-15 as a percent of 2015 population. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Examining Population Components of Change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a region’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

State by County Profiles
Click a state link to view a state by county profile. For each state, eight tables of population change are presented. Each of the eight tables shows characteristics of each/all counties in the state in addition to state overall.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Use the Interactive Table
.. to examine patterns in states of interest. The following interactive table graphic shows the 14 states that experienced negative domestic migration during the period 2010-2015. See full full interactive table. Click link for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

County Population & Components of Change Trends

.. new/updated annual county population estimates … counties, and county equivalent areas such as independent cities, are the primary political subdivision of states.  The relative stable geography of counties, with good national scope geographic granularity, makes these areas appealing for use in tabulating data as well as analyzing data. This section provides information on tools and data related to accessing, integrating analyzing county demographic-economic patterns and trends focused on the latest official county population and components of change estimates (through 2014, released March 2015). See related Web page for more details.

Using GIS Tools to Examine Patterns of Population & Change
The following view illustrates use of Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to visually examine demographic characteristics of Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA region by county. The thematic/color pattern shows percent population change 2010-2014. Labels show county 2014 population. Develop this type of view for any metro or region.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated CountyTrends GIS Project
— click graphic for larger view showing details.

See the Metro Profile for this metro. See more about metros. Click on a metro link in the in the metro interactive table to view a similarly structured profile for any metro.

Population Components of Change
Annual population and components of change estimates for each county, 2010 though 2014, are included in the dataset used in the create the map shown above. Similar thematic pattern maps can be generated for any county/region for any of these items, or computed items such as birth rate.

Population components of change are shown in the population identity:
P[i,t] = P[i,t-1] + B[i,t] – D[i,t] + MD[i,t] +MI[i,t]
for the ith geographic area; t: year
where the components of population change are:
  – B[i,t] … births in area i in year t
  – D[i,t] … deaths in area i in year t
  – MD[i,t] … domestic migration in area i in year t
  – MI[i,t] … international migration in area i in year t

County Population & Components of Change Interactive Table
Use the interactive table in the related Web section to interactively view, rank, compare annual population and population components of change for all states and 3,143 counties. For counties that are part of a metropolitan area, the table includes the new and previous metro (CBSA) codes.

The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table. A query is used to view only those counties in the Charlotte metro. These rows/records are then sorted (dbl-click column header) on the Census 2010 population. It can be seen from the table that Mecklendurg County has the largest Census 2010 population (919,628) and the metro Census 2010 total population is 2,217,012.

— click graphic for larger view showing details.

Examining Characteristics of Individual Counties
Click on the Mecklenburg County link in the interactive table to view an extended profile for the county (available for any county) as shown below.

— click graphic for larger view showing details.

Use the interactive table and click on a county link to view a similar profile for county(s) of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

State Population 2014 & Demographic Change

.. state population dynamics are changing. Learn more about how states are changing and why — using tools and resources reviewed here. Examine how these changes might impact you.

Births as one component of change … births in the U.S. for the years 2011 through 2014 are estimated at 3.97M, 3.94M, 3.96M and 3.96M (birth rates of 12.80, 12.58, 12.54, 12.46). This relatively flat pattern varies substantially by state and region. The Northeast, Midwest and West regions experienced declining births 2010-14, while the South region had a modest increase. View extensive detail on the population and population components of change in the interactive table below. Sort, rank compare states and regions based on single years or change over time. Use our GIS project to visually examine patterns. Details below. These new 2014 state population and components of change (births, deaths, migration) estimates were released December 23 and will update with 2015 estimates in late 2015. See the related Web section with interactive table and more details.

State Migration Patterns, 2010-2014
The following view shows patterns of total cumulative state net migration for the years 2011-2014 (7/1/10 to 7/1/14). See inset legend. The label shows total state net migration for the period as a percent of 2014 total population. In expanded view, the top label shows the total state net migration for the period and the bottom label shows total state net migration for the period as a percent of 2014 total population. Use the GIS project (details below) to create views with other population and population components of change or rates for any year or year group. Label areas are desired. Add other layers such as regions or divisions. Add your own data.

View created with CV XE GIS. Click graphic for larger view with more detail.

Importance of these Data; Projecting Future Patterns
These data are important. They tell stakeholders how the population is changing, when, and where by state, multi-state regions and for the U.S.; overall. Annual measures of population change provide insights into recent patterns and how the population might change during the next few years. These data do not, in general, tell us why the population is changing. More detailed estimates of state and sub-state 2014 population by age, gender and race origin will be released between now and mid-2015.

These historical data, based on facts or near-facts, are used in models to develop projections of how the population size, characteristics and distribution might evolve in the years ahead. The projections need to be updated annually to reflect the more factually based estimates. The models endeavor to capture/specify the why of population change and how change manifests itself by age, gender and race/origin — and the all important where and when.

Selected Top 10 State Rankings

Using the GIS Resources: Flexible Visual Pattern Analysis
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the U.S. by State Population 2014 GIS project fileset
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now, no fee)
… unzip U.S. State Population GIS project files to local folder c:\popest
3. Open the c:\popest\stpop2014.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named c:\popest\stpop2014.gis
4. Done. The start-up view is similar to the graphic shown at the top of this section.

Using the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, query and compare states based on detailed characteristics. The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to rank states in descending order based on population change 2010 to 2014 (see pointer in rightmost column).

Click graphic for larger view.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about demographic economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

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