Tag Archives: demographic analysis

Urban Area Demographic Trends 2010-15

.. tools and analytics to examine all urban areas with particular focus on Urbanized Areas and demographic change between 2010 and 2015 .. examining urban areas in context of metropolitan areas .. the four fastest growing Urbanized Areas (UAs) from 2010 to 2015 were in Texas. McKinney, TX UA led the nation with an increase of 27.5% in total population. View, rank, compare 2010 and 2015 demographic characteristics for UAs using the interactive table in this related section. Urban areas (Urbanized Areas and Urban Clusters) are important for many reasons. More than metros and cities, urban area geography better reflects how the urban and rural population is changing. Both metros and cities can change geographic boundary over the years. Urban areas are based on Census 2010 and unchanging between 2010 and 2020. Annual demographic updates are available from the American Community Survey (ACS 2015).

This section is focused on tools and analytics to examine all urban areas with particular focus on Urbanized Areas and demographic change between 2010 and 2015. Use the interactive table >in the related section to view, rank, query urban areas and demographic change for larger urban areas. Use the related GIS tools and data to develop related thematic and relationship maps. Perform geospatial analysis of geographic and demographic-economic characteristics using the resources we have developed. Gain insights into patterns that might affect you. Use these resources to collaborate on how, where, what, when and why of change.

McKinney TX Urbanized Area in Context of City
The McKinney, TX UA (bold orange pattern) is shown in context of McKinney city (cross-hatched area) and other urban areas (lighter orange pattern). It is easy to see that some parts of the city are rural and that the UA extends beyond the city in many areas. See more about the McKinney UA and in comparison to other urban areas using the interactive table.


– view created using CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Most Urbanized Areas (UAs, 435 of 487) have population 65,000 population or more resulting in the availability of annual demographic-economic estimates. Data are fresher than available for smaller urban areas (ACS 5-year estimates for areas under 65,000). This means more current data to assess more recent characteristics. As annual data are available UAs enabling analysis of change over time. The “2010s” marks the first time these refreshed, time series-like data have been available for urban areas. Businesses and those examining change performing market analysis benefit from the ability to examine characteristics or urban areas in combination with counties and metros.

Houston Urbanized Area in Context of Houston Metro
The Houston metro has a bold brown boundary. It is easy to see how the Houston UA (darker orange fill pattern) geographically relates to the metro. Other urban areas (all) are shown with a lighter orange fill pattern. It is easy to see the urban/pattern character of the general region. While the Houston UA is the largest, there are four UAs that intersect with Houston metro. Use the interactive table below to view their names and characteristics.


– view created using CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Urbanized Areas tend to be associated with metropolitan areas having a similar name. But very often there are multiple UAs within a metro; sometimes one is not dominant. Often there are several UAs in a metro having similar size. Use the interactive table below to view the relationship of UAs and metros (CBSAs).

Using Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query urban areas based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

The graphic shows the urbanized areas ranked in descending order based on 2010-2015 population. The rightmost column shows the area percent change in population over the period.

Fastest Growing Urbanized Areas, 2010-15

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine urban area patterns and characteristics based on your selected criteria.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metro Situation & Outlook Reports Updated

.. how are metros of interest changing? The Metro Situation & Outlook Reports provide the premier integrated, multi-sourced demographic-economic overview for individual metropolitan areas.

Largest 25 Metros Based on 2015 Population
Click graphic for larger view with names. Expand browser window for best view. Label shows metro rank among all 917 metros based on 2015 population.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

The no fee report for each metro was updated today with the annually updated population and population components of change. Use this interactive table to view, query, rank metros. Examine total population annually 2010 to 2015 and rankings.

Click on a link in the interactive table to view the integrated, multi-sourced demographic-economic Situation & Outlook report for that metro. See this example for the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA. The metro report provides drill-down demographic-economic attributes of metro component areas including counties, cities and school districts.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

American Community Survey 2014 Interactive Tables

.. examining demographic-economic patterns .. use the interactive tables described in this section to examine, view, compare, rank and assess demographic-economic patterns and characteristics of interest for wide-ranging geography based on ACS 2014 data.

It is very important to understand the demographic-economic make-up and patterns for wide-ranging geographies. Community and neighborhood challenges and opportunities are shaped by demographic-economic dynamics. Knowing more about “where we are now” is essential to understanding needs for policy and program management. The quality and precision of business marketing and operational plans and decisions can be improved using these data. School districts can better understand their school district community using these data. Elected officials and policymakers can better understand the needs and characteristics of constituents who they represent. Students can benefit by using these data in studies and research by attaching real world data to support, document and analyze topics of interest.

Data from the American Community Survey 2014 (ACS 2014) are key to these uses, users and processes. See more about the importance of these data. The ACS 2014 interactive tables are part of a larger set of tables comprised of multi-sourced data that are updated frequently. Additional ACS 2014 tables will be added. Join the User Group to receive updates as tables are added.

Median Household Income by ZIP Code Area; Los Angeles Area
Illustrating integration of data in tables using GIS tools & geospatial analysis. Larger view illustrates ZIP code area labeling and use of mini-profile feature.

View developed with CV XE GIS software. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

Using the Tables
The interactive tables are organized by type of geography (e.g., ZIP codes) using a standardized structure. There are four types of subject matter for each type of geography (general demographic, social, economic and housing). There is a table/web page for each combination of geography by type of subject matter.

Within each table there is a row that corresponds to a geographic area. Also within each table, columns provide geographic names and codes and a set of subject matter data standardized across all geographies. Similarly designed table controls are provided at the below the table. Usage notes are located below the table.

Terms of Use
These data may be used for any purpose, except that the data may not be bulk downloaded nor used to create similar interactive tables. There is no warranty of any type with regard to any aspect of the data, table or Web pages. The user is solely responsible for any use. It is requested that any use of any table reference the source of the data (ACS 2014), ProximityOne and a link to the Web page.

Data Analytics
ProximityOne has developed these interactive tables as part of a broader set of data analytics tools and data resources. Data shown in the tables are available in dataset structure (CSV, DBF, Excel) on a fee basis. These data are also available as data integrated into shapefiles for GIS applications and geospatial analysis. Most geographic table sections also provide access to ready-to-use GIS projects/datasets. These data are integrated with yet other data to develop/update the Situation & Outlook database and information system, ProximityOne Data Service,Situation & Outlook Metro Reports and other products. These data are also used in the ProximityOne Certificate in Data Analytics and custom service/study applications.

Where’s Waldo?
Use this interactive tool to key in an address and determine geographic codes (geocodes) that might be useful. After keying in an address, click Find button. If the address is located, the page refreshes with a set of geocodes presented below the demographic-economic statistical summary.

ACS 2014 Tables & Datasets
ACS summary data are are tabulated and released annually as 1-year and 5-year estimates. These data are all estimates, subject to errors of estimation and other errors, based on household surveys.
ACS 1-year estimates (for areas 65,000 population or more) become available in September; e.g. the ACS 2014 1-year estimates became available in September 2015.
ACS 5-year estimates (all geographies) become available in December; e.g. the ACS 2014 5-year estimates became available in December 2015.
• See this section for more information about 1-year versus 5-year estimates and comparing ACS data over time.
Table listing provided below are separated into two groups as to data source: ACS 1-year and ACS 5-year. All tables are U.S. national scope.

ACS 2014 1-Year Tables


Data in these tables are centric to mid-2014.
U.S., State, CBSA/Metro
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

114th Congressional Districts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

ACS 2014 5-Year Tables


Data in these tables are centric to mid-2012 (mid-point of survey period 2010-2014).
Census Tracts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

ZIP Code Areas
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

School Districts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

State Legislative Districts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about using these data in context of data analytics with other geography and other subject matter.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

 

Neighborhood Analysis: Block & Block Group Demographics

.. steps to analyze NYC Chelsea area demographics that can be applied to any neighborhood … demographic characteristics of the Chelsea area in New York City, an area west of Avenue of the Americas between 14th and 34th Streets, is radically different from adjacent areas. This topic was covered in a “great wealth divide” New York Times story. This section reviews how census block and block group demographic-economic data can be used to examine these patterns. A GIS project is used that associates census block and block group data for visual analysis Methods summarized here can be applied to any area. Use the tools described in this section to obtain demographic-economic profiles for any neighborhood based on an address. See related Web page for more detail.

See related post on Most Populated New York City Census Blocks.

Study Area in Context of Broader Area
The study area, a group of selected census tracts, is shown as the red cross-hatched area in context of lower Manhattan in the view below.

  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

Zoom-in View of Study Area
The next view shows a zoom-in to the study area. Block groups are shown with a red boundary. Chelsea Park is visible as the green area above the pointer south of 29th street.

  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

Census Block Demographics in Context of Block Groups
The next view shows a further zoom-in showing census blocks with black boundary and block groups with red boundary. Census blocka are shown with a semi-transparent yellow fill pattern (population greater than 4) and gray fill pattern (blocks with population less than 5). The block group containing Chelsea Park (green area above pointer) contains three census blocks, 2 with no population and one with 1,010 population. Block data are from Census 2010; there are no post-Census 2010 block level demographics available. The analysis could be extended to shown wide-ranging demographics at the block level.

  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

Examining Socioeconomic Attributes
In this further zoom-in, Chelsea Park (green area) is shown near the pointer. Census block population labels are turned off for blocks with 5 or more population to help show a less cluttered view. Block groups are labeled with two values. The yellow upper label shows the median housing value (MHV). The green lower label shows median household income (MHI). Both data items are based on the American Community Survey 5-year estimates (ACS 2013) are centric to 2011. The ACS data are updated annually; as of October 2015, the latest data are from ACS 2013; the ACS 2014 data become available December 2015. The ACS 2013 5 year estimates are top-coded at $1,000,001 for MHV and $250,001 for $MHI.


  — view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project

The block group containing Chelsea Park has a median household income of $26,440; the median housing value estimate is not available (too few owner-occupied units to develop MHV estimate). The Chelsea Park block group code is “360610097002” — this code uniquely identifies this block group among all other block groups in the U.S.

The block group immediately to the south of the Chelsea Park block group median household income of $21,750; the median housing value estimate is $1,000,001 (top-coded). The code for this block group code is “360610093006”.

While the MHI for BG 360610093006 might seem like it should be higher, a look at the number of households by income interval explains this number. Almost half of the households in the BG have a household income below $20,000. Analytical options that might be considered include using mean household income or mean family income instead of median.

Compare number of households by household income intervals for these two block groups.

Compare Your Block Group of Interest to Chelsea Park BG
Compare the above BG attributes to any BG of interest:
1. Copy and paste this string into text editor (eg, Notepad) window (do not press enter after paste):
http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/13_5YR/B19001/1500000USXXXXXXXXXXX|1500000US360610097002

2. Click here, key in an address then click Find to locate the 11 character BG code.
— scroll down to “2010 Census Blocks” and then further to “GEOID”
— copy the first 11 digits of the GEOID value to clipboard see illustrative graphic.

3. Paste those 11 characters into the URL, replacing the “XXXXXXXXXXXX”; this modification must be exact.

4. Press Enter. A profile appears comparing your BG to the Chelsea Park BG 360610097002.

Data Analytics Lab Session
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session. There is no fee. Discuss how tools and methods reviewed in this section can be applied to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.