Tag Archives: Counties

How the New York Metro is Changing

.. or more precisely, how the New York Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is changing. As of Census 2010 the New York MSA (officially the New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA MSA) consisted of 20 counties. With the new OMB metropolitan statistical areas defined as of February 2013, the New York MSA became 22 counties, absorbing the Poughkeepsie, NY MSA two counties (Dutchess and Orange). The Poughkeepie MSA was removed from the official MSAs. The delineation remained that way until the new September 2018 delineations when the Census 2010 delineation was restored. Now, the Poughkeepsie, NY MSA exists as a 2 county area and the New York MSA exists as a 20 county area (both as they existed geographically in Census 2010).

These metro-county relationships are shown in the graphic presented below. The Poughkeepsie, NY MSA is shown with the blue cross-hatch to the north and the New York MSA is shown with the salmon color pattern.

– view developed using the CV XE GIS software and related GIS project.
– see the related New York Metro Situation & Outlook report.

What Difference Does it Make?
A lot! First, during the interim period 2013-2018, the Poughkeepsie, NY MSA lost the metropolitan area identity/status as conferred by the OMB delineations. It might have been omitted from size class market development and research analyses. Related, that metro was not included as a tabulation or estimation area of MSAs by Federal statistical agencies. An example of the impact is that the official demographic estimates for the Poughkeepsie, NY MSA developed by the Census Bureau were not tabulated as such and omitted from various statistical reports. Also, the removal of designation and now adding the designation back, creates a hiccup in the time series — affecting both the Poughkeepsie NY MSA and the New York MSA.

Detailed Demographic Profiles for New York MSA and Poughkeepsie, NY MSA
.. click link to view profile.

New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA MSA
  Bergen County, NJ (34003)
  Essex County, NJ (34013)
  Hudson County, NJ (34017)
  Hunterdon County, NJ (34019)
  Middlesex County, NJ (34023)
  Monmouth County, NJ (34025)
  Morris County, NJ (34027)
  Ocean County, NJ (34029)
  Passaic County, NJ (34031)
  Somerset County, NJ (34035)
  Sussex County, NJ (34037)
  Union County, NJ (34039)
  Bronx County, NY (36005)
  Kings County, NY (36047)
  Nassau County, NY (36059)
  New York County, NY (36061)
  Putnam County, NY (36079)
  Queens County, NY (36081)
  Richmond County, NY (36085)
  Rockland County, NY (36087)
  Suffolk County, NY (36103)
  Westchester County, NY (36119)
  Pike County, PA (42103)

Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown, NY (CBSA 39100)
  Dutchess County, NY (36027)
  Orange County, NY (36071)

Looking Forward
The September 2018 CBSA delineations define counties that will be used for Census 2020 (likely, there could be yet further changes) — 384 MSAs in the U.S. In the cases of the New York MSA and the Poughkeepsie, NY MSA, it appears that the geography (component counties) used for Census 2010 will be the same as for Census 2020. Going forward, ProximityOne estimates and projections will use the most current vintage of CBSAs.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

2013 Metros: Houston, TX

Goto ProximityOne  94% of the U.S. population live in metropolitan areas.  Metropolitan areas are comprised of one or more contiguous counties having a high degree of economic and social integration. This section is one in a continuing series of posts focused on a specific metropolitan area — this one on the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA.   This section illustrates how relevant Decision-Making Information (DMI) resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights.  The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro. About metros.

Focus on Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA
A thumbnail … in 2012, the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $51,004. This PCPI ranked 23rd in the United States and was 117 percent of the national average, $43,735. The 2012 PCPI reflected an increase of 4.5 percent from 2011. The 2011-2012 national change was 3.4 percent. In 2002 the PCPI of the Houston MSA was $34,696 and ranked 37th in the United States. The 2002-2012 compound annual growth rate of PCPI was 3.9 percent. The compound annual growth rate for the nation was 3.2 percent.  These data are based in part on the Regional Economic Information System (REIS).  More detail from REIS for the Houston metro at the end of this section.

Geography of the Houston MSA
The geography of the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA is shown in the graphic below.  The green boundary shows the 2013 vintage metro, black boundary/hatch pattern shows the 2010 vintage boundary, counties labeled. San Jacinto County is no longer a part of the metro.

houstonmsa

Changing Metro Structures Reflect Demographic Dynamics
Click here
to view a profile for the 2013 vintage Houston metro. Use this interactive table to view demographic attributes of these counties and rank/compare with other counties.

The Census 2010 population of the 2013 vintage metro is 5,920,416 (6th largest MSA) compared to the 2012 estimate of 6,177,035 (5th largest MSA). See interactive table to examine other metros in a similar manner.

Demographic-Economic Characteristics
View selected ACS 2012 demographic-economic characteristics for the Houston metro (2010 vintage) in this interactive table.  Examine this metro in context of peer metros; e.g., similarly sized metros.  In 2012, the Houston metro had a median household income of $55,910, percent high school graduates 81.1%, percent college graduates 29.6% and 16.4% in poverty.

Houston Demographic-Economic Profiles
Use the APIGateway to access detailed ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  A partial view of the Houston 2010 metro DE-3 economic characteristics profile is shown below.  Install the no fee CV XE tools on your PC to view extended profiles for Houston or any metro. See U.S. ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.  

Houston 2010 vintage MSA Economic Characteristics
cbsa26420de3

Houston Metro Gross Domestic Product
View selected Houston 2013 vintage metro Gross Domestic Product (GDP) patterns in this interactive table.  The Houston metro 2012 real per capita GDP is estimated to be $62,438 ($385,683M real GDP/6,177,035 population).

Examining Longer-Term Demographic Historical Change
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare Census 2000 and Census 2010 population for Census 2010 vintage metros (all metros).
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare 2013 vintage metros (all metros) — Census 2000, Census 2010, 2012 estimates population and related data.

Houston Metro by County Population Projections to 2060
The graphic presented below shows county population projections to 2060 for the 2013 vintage metro.  Use this interactive table to view similar projections for all counties.  The metro population is projected to increase to 2.8 million by 2030 and to 3.4 million by 2060 based based on current trends and model assumptions. Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.

Houston Metro Population Projections by County to 2060
cbsa26420projections

Thematic Maps & Visual Analysis
The graphic below shows the 2013 vintage metro (bold boundary) counties labeled with county name and county per capita personal income (PCPI).  The legend shows the change in PCPI from 2008 to 2012.
cbsa16740ctypcpi

The above graphic illustrates the power of using visual analysis tools (CV XE GIS).  These data are from the  Regional Economic Information System (REIS) introduced earlier in this section.  Use the links shown below to examine much more detail from REIS at the metro and county level.  A thematic pattern map could be developed for any one of these items.  The REIS data are annual time series starting in 1970 and continue to 2012.  Click a link to view a sample profile spreadsheet for Harris County, TX and the Houston MSA for 2011 and 2012.
• Personal income, per capita personal income, and population (CA1-3)
• Personal income summary (CA04)
• Personal income and earnings by industry (CA05, CA05N)
• Compensation of employees by industry (CA06, CA06N)
• Economic profiles (CA30)
• Gross flow of earnings (CA91)

Join us in an Upcoming Decision-Making Information Webinar
We will review topics and data used in this section in the upcoming webinar “Metropolitan Area Geographic-Demographic-Economic Characteristics & Trends” on January 9, 2014.  This is one of many topics covered in the DMI Webinars (see more).  Register here (one hour, no fee).

About Metropolitan Areas
By definition, metropolitan areas are comprised of one or more contiguous counties. Metropolitan areas are not single cities and typically include many cities. Metropolitan areas contain urban and rural areas and often have large expanses of rural territory. A business and demographic-economic synergy exists within each metro; metros often interact with adjacent metros. The demographic-economic makeup of metros vary widely and change often.

2013 vintage metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

2013 Metros: Charlotte, NC-SC

How will the market for single family homes in the Charlotte, NC metro change over the next 5 years? 20 years? How does the metro GDP in the Charlotte metro compare to others? What are the patterns in metro rental income and homeownership/vacancy rates? How are they trending?

2013 vintage metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).  This section is focused on the Charlotte, NC-SC metro.  It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather illustrate how relevant DMI resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights.  The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro.

Focus on Charlotte, NC MSA
The Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA is shown in the graphic below.  The green boundary shows the 2013 vintage metro, black boundary/hatch pattern shows the 2010 vintage boundary, state blue boundary, counties labeled. Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.

Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA

Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA

Changing Metro Structures Reflect Demographic Dynamics
Click here
to view a profile for the Charlotte metro. The profile shows the addition of five counties relative to the Census 2010 vintage.  Use this interactive table to view demographic attributes of these counties and rank/compare with other counties.

The Census 2010 population of the 2013 vintage metro is 2,217,012 (25th largest) compared to 1,758,038 (33rd largest) based on the 2010 vintage of the metro. The Charlotte metro ranks 24th in population (2,296,569) among 2013 vintage metros based on the 2012 estimate. Several metros have 2012 population of similar size including: San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, PR, Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA, San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX, Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL, Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, CA with others quite close. See interactive table to examine other metros in a similar manner.

Demographic-Economic Characteristics
View selected ACS 2012 demographic-economic characteristics for the Charlotte metro (2013 vintage) in this interactive table.  View this metro in context of peer metros; e.g., similarly sized metros.  The Charlotte metro 2012 total population of 697,439, median household income of $50,108, percent high school graduates 88.1%, percent college graduates 31.3% and 15.2% in poverty.

Charlotte Demographic-Economic Profiles
Use the APIGateway to access detailed ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  A partial view of the Charlotte metro DE-3 economic characteristics profile is shown below.  Install the no fee CV XE tools on your PC to view extended profiles for Charlotte or any metro. See U.S. ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.  

Charlotte MSA Economic Characteristics
Charlotte MSA Economic Characteristics

Charlotte Metro Gross Domestic Product
View selected Charlotte metro Gross Domestic Product (GDP) patterns in this interactive table.  The Charlotte metro 2012 real per capita GDP is estimated to be $118,862.  The metro ranks 21st among all 381 metros.

Examining Longer-Term Demographic Historical Change
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare Census 2000 and Census 2010 population for Census 2010 vintage metros (all metros).
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare 2013 vintage metros (all metros) — Census 2000, Census 2010, 2012 estimates population and related data.

Charlotte Metro by County Population Projections to 2060
The graphic presented below shows county population projections to 2060 for the 2013 vintage metro.  Use this interactive table to view similar projections for all counties.  The metro population is projected to increase to 2.8 million by 2030 and to 3.4 million by 2060 based based on current trends and model assumptions. Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.

Charlotte Metro Population Projections by County to 2060
2060 Projections

By definition, metropolitan areas are comprised of one or more contiguous counties. Metropolitan areas are not single cities and typically include many cities. Metropolitan areas are comprised of urban and rural areas and often have large expanses of rural territory. A business and demographic-economic synergy exists within each metro; metros often interact with adjacent metros. The demographic-economic makeup of metros vary widely and change often.