Tag Archives: Census Tracts

Census Block, Block Group & Census Tract GeoDemographics

Census tracts, block groups and blocks are the important small area statistical geographic areas for which data from Census 2010 are tabulated. Data for census tracts and block groups are also tabulated annually from the American Community Survey. For example. in December 2018, we will have new “richer demographics” annual estimates centric to each year 2008 through 2015 for Census 2010 tracts and block groups … data such as educational attainment, language spoken, housing and household characteristics,  income characteristics and employment and other demographic-economic attributes.

Largest Population New York City (NYC) Census Blocks
The following graphic shows the NYC Census 2010 census block having the largest Census 2010 population that is not a group quarters population block. The Lincoln Center census block shown in the graphic (red boundary) has 4,067 population and 2,922 housing units.

– click graphic for larger view; view developed using CV XE GIS

This block (36 061 015500 6000) occupies 0.033 square miles. It has a population density of 122,333 (population per square mile). The NYC block with the largest population is on Rikers Island and has a group quarters population of 8,634 and 0 housing units. For Census 2010, there were 350,169 census blocks covering the state of New York; 13,356 census blocks were water blocks. For the State of New York, as of Census 2010 the average census block population was 55 (57 excluding water blocks).

Census 2010 and Census 2020
These geographies have generally stable geographic areas and codes from one decennial census (e.g., Census 2010) to the next (e.g., Census 2020). Many of these areas will change in terms of code and area for Census 2020, though the geographic changes will typically be small or not at all.

Census 2020 block, block group and tract codes and geometry will be available in late 2020. Initial block level demographics will be available in March 2021.

Census 2010 & Current GeoDemographics
These areas cover the U.S. from wall-to-wall and generally non-changing in terms of boundary and geographic code (geocode) until Census 2020. This section provides a summary of new Web pages with more detail about each of these geographies:
census tracts and tract codes .. 73,056 areas
census block groups and block group codes .. 217,740 areas
census blocks and block codes .. 11,078,297 areas

Each of these pages provides an interactive table to view tallies of Census 2010 for each of these small area geographies.

Combining Address Data with Small Area Geography
The address of the Office of the California Secretary of State, located at 1500 11th St, Sacramento, CA 95814, was geocoded using the APIGeocoder and converted into a shapefile for Geographic Information System applications.  The location is shown as a red marker in the map views shown below, illustrating each type of small area geography: tracts. block groups and blocks.

Census Tracts
Tracts are labeled with green tract codes. Address 1500 11th St, Sacramento, CA 95814 is shown by red marker.  The address is in tract 06067001101.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Block Groups
Block groups are labeled with red block group codes.  Tract 06067001101 is comprised of block groups: 060670011011 and 060670011012.  See pointer in map view; the block group within tract boundary.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Zoom-in to Census Block
Blocks are labeled with yellow block codes. The address is located in block 060670011011085.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Further Zoom-in Showing Streets
Streets are labeled with street names. Identify tool is used to show mini-profile for 1500 block of 11th Street.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Is the tract code 11.01 or 001101?
Both. Census tracts within a county are identified by a 4-digit basic code between 0001 and 9999, and may have a 2-digit suffix ranging from .01 to .98; for example, 6059.02. The decimal point separating the 4-digit basic tract code from the 2-digit suffix is shown in Census Bureau printed reports and maps. For geo-referencing, the decimal point is implied and does not appear; the 6-character tract code with lead zeroes is used — a character string with no blanks and all numbers.

Accessing and Using these Geographies & Related Demographics
There are several ways these geographies can be used.
• The geocodes are the “handles” to access demographic-economic statistical data.
• The geographies may be visually, geospatially, related as shapefiles.
.. the Census Bureau makes these shapefiles available for use in user appications.
.. the shapefiles typically do not include demographic-economic data.

Access Census 2010 Census Block (and Block Group/Tract) data:
• P.L. 94-171 Redistricting Data — http://proximityone.com/cen2010_pl94171.htm
• Summary File 1 — http://proximityone.com/cen2010_sf1.htm

Access Census Block Group and Tract richer demographics:
• 2016 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates
  — http://proximityone.com/acs1216.htm
• Access annual counterparts to above section
• Census blocks — http://proximityone.com/cenblk.htm
• Census block groups — http://proximityone.com/blockgroups.htm
• Census tracts — http://proximityone.com/tracts.htm

Alternatively use the Census Bureau APIs or CV XE GIS APIGateway.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
.. is my area urban, rural or …
.. how do census blocks relate to congressional district? redistricting?
.. how can I map census block demographics?
Join me in a Data Analytics Web Session, every Tuesday, where we review access to and use of data, tools and methods relating to GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning. We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

TractWatch — Examining Small Area Change

Understanding the demographic-economic landscape for small area geography and how it is changing is vital for many stakeholders. Businesses and other organizations need to know how their market/service areas are changing … getting answers to questions like knowing about recent trends, where we are now and the how/where/how much things might change in the future.

Examining Tract Change
The following view shows census tracts (black boundary) located in the northeast Houston, TX area. Tracts are labeled with 2017 population estimates and percent population change from 2010 to 2017. Tract geography and characteristics are shown in context of three cities/places — Houston (orange cross-hatch), Humble (blue) and Atascocita CDP (green). It is easy to see what census tracts intersect with what cities and where. The pointer/hand is located in census tract 48-201-240902, partly intersecting with Humble city. The tract 2017 population of 12,984 reflects an increase of 10.4% since 2010. The dark brown bold boundary at the top of this tract is the Harris County, TX boundary.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
.. create views like this for any area in the U.S.; add your own data.

TractWatch tells us which tracts in a region of interest changed during the past year based on quarterly observable data with only a one quarter lag.

Census Tracts & TractWatch
TractWatch is a new tool/service focused on examining recent demographic-business change for each census tract. These approximate 74,000 geographic areas cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and averaged 4,000 population as of Census 2010. Tracts have a generally stable geography between decennial censuses and are coterminous with county boundaries. Tracts cover the U.S. with more than a 2-to-1 ratio compared to ZIP code areas (see tract-ZIP relationship table).

Integrated with Situation & Outlook
TractWatch insights are developed through the use of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook (S&O) database and information system — a part of S&O demographic-economic estimates and projections developed and updated annually. The 2017 vintage tract estimates and projections (annual data) cover the period 2010 through 2022 (5-year projection).

TractWatch – Monitoring Change
As a part of the S&O annual estimates and projections development, a range of measures are updated quarterly at the census tract level. Quarterly data are developed that include population, housing units, vacant units, households and business establishments.

There is only a one-quarter lag in the availability of observable census tract data. For example, observable 2017Q1 data can be added to the S&O database in July 2017. Data are analyzed and converted into a TractWatch national dataset.

Situation & Outlook Reports
The Situation & Outlook Reports (S&O Reports) are updated weekly, for the U.S. and each county, metro and state. TractWatch is a part of the “Recent Change and Outlook” S&O Report section and updated quarterly. See schedule of updates the shows when TractWatch is updated.

The S&O Reports (metro and county) Recent Change and Outlook section includes a list of census tracts which have shown significant change over the past year for that geography. A table of typically 10-to-25 key tracts are listed in a table with selected demographic-business change attributes.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Analyzing Block Group Demographics

.. tools & data to analyze sub-census tract households, education, income, housing, more … Block Groups, subdivisions of census tracts, are the smallest geographic areas for which “richer demographics” are developed by the Census Bureau. Block group demographic-economic estimates, based on Census 2010 geography, are annually updated beginning with American Community Survey (ACS) 2010. The latest ACS estimates for these 217,740 areas covering U.S. wall-to-wall are from ACS 2015. The ACS 2016 update will be released in December 2017.  See the related Web section for more detail about accessing and using block group geography and demographic-economic data.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by Block Group
The following graphic shows patterns of median household income by block group in the Houston, TX area. Markers show block groups with 10 or more housing units having value of $2 million or more. Markers are labeled with the number of housing units having value of $2 million or more in that block group. Click graphic for larger view, more detail and legend color/data intervals. This map illustrates the geographic level of detail available using block group demographics and the relative ease to gain insights using geospatial data analytics tools.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Block Group Demographic-Economic Data & Shapefiles
… selection of key demographic-economic attributes; annual update
… subject matter categories include:
  • Total population>
  • Population by gender iterated by age
  • Population by race/origin
  • Households by type of household
  • Educational attainment by detailed category
  • Household Income by detailed category
  • Housing units by owner/renter occupancy
  • Housing units by units in structure
  • Housing units by detailed value intervals

See the related Web section for a detailed list of items.

Use these Data on Your Computer
Use the above U.S. national scope dataset with your own software or in ready-to-use GIS projects with the CV XE GIS software.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Creating Maps & GIS Projects

.. follow these steps to create custom maps & GIS projects .. while maps are “everywhere,” there is a continuing need to make new maps. Reasons for this include changing underlying geography, new features (like stores or customers to be viewed), visually examining geographic relationships not available elsewhere (e.g., census tracts and ZIP codes), different geographic depictions for an area (smoothed versus precise vertices) and other reasons. A map can provide view(s) that relate to geospatial analysis; map visualization can be indispensable (showing road features adjacent to selected properties).

View of Initial Map Objective — University Park, TX; Dallas Metro area
Census tracts (black boundary) shown with census tract code as label.

— view developed using CV XE GIS software

Follow steps in this section to make a map like above for any area in the U.S. This section provides an overview of how to use the CVGIS software to quickly build a map. It is actually more than a map, it is the process of building a GIS project. A map is one rendering that can be displayed, and optionally published, using a GIS project. Map/GIS project development steps reviewed here can be performed using the no fee CVGIS software and no fee data resources, CVGIS Levels 1 and higher can save the GIS project and have additional geography available. With geographic extension, the process illustrated here can work for any place in the world. A GIS project is a file itself that contains references to map files (shapefiles) located on your computer. Once a GIS project has been created and saved, it can be immediately opened with CVGIS using the File>Open operation. After turning your computer off, and restarting it, the GIS project can be re-opened to display the same view as saved in an earlier session.

No Previous GIS/Mapping Experience Required
This section is designed for use by anyone including those with no previous GIS/mapping experience. Requirements are a Windows computer and Internet access. This section is a part of a module used in the Certificate in Data Analytics and the CVGIS Certification Programs. Developers can also benefit from this and related tutorials to learn more about how GIS can be integrated with other data analytics tools and methods.

Making Maps Steps
The objective of this session is to develop a map (and GIS project) to view characteristics of census tract “48113019301”. The first step in making a map (GIS project) is to have a clear objective. This 11 character geocode uniquely identifies this Census 2010 census tract among all other 73,057 tracts in the U.S. See more about census tract geography and geocodes. While this application shows a process for adding only two layers, it could be extended by adding more. Similarly, while this application uses a census tract boundary files (shapefile), alternatives are census blocks, block groups, ZIP code areas, among others.

These steps should take an inexperienced user 10-15 minutes to develop a new CVGIS project view. If anything becomes confused, close the program and start over.
Step 1. Install CVGIS (1/1/2017 or later version)
Step 2. Open Base Project
Step 3. Get Census Tract Shapefile
Step 4. Get Roads Shapefile
Step 5. Modify Map View
Step 6. Optionally Save GIS Project

The view should now be similar to the view at the top of this section.

Next Steps
Try the process yourself with geography of interest to you. View/use other “Creating Maps & GIS Projects” tutorials to learn about:
• integrating subject matter
• developing and using thematic maps
• creating site profiles

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Tip of the Day — Census Tract Data Analytics

.. tip of the day .. a continuing weekly or more frequent tip on developing, integrating, accessing and using geographic, demographic, economic and statistical data. Join in .. tip of the day posts are added to the Data Analytics Blog on an irregular basis, normally weekly. Follow the blog to receive updates as they occur.

This section is focused on tools and methods to access and use census tract demographic-economic measures. Median household income ($MHI), median housing value ($MHV) and other selected items are used to illustrate operations and options.

This section illustrates use of census tract data from the 2014 American Community Survey (ACS1014) 5-year estimates. These are the most comprehensive demographic-economic data from the Census Bureau at the census tract level. These “5-year estimates” are centric to mid-2012. See more about 2010-2021 annual estimates and projections.

Methods described here apply to many other geographies; see related tip sections. See related section on ZIP code applications.

Five data access and use options are reviewed. Each method illustrates how $$MHI, $MHV and other data can be analyzed/used in different contexts.

Option 1 – View the data as a thematic pattern map.
Option 2 – View, compare, rank query data in interactive tables.
Option 3 – Access data using API Tools; create datasets.
Option 4 – View $MHI in structured profile in context of related data.
Option 5 – Site analysis – view circular area profile from a location.

Related sections:
Census tracts main section
Evolution of Census Tracts: 1970-2010
Demographic-Economic Estimates & Projections
Census tract and ZIP code equivalencing
Using census tracts versus ZIP code areas
Single year of age demographics

Option 1. View the data as a thematic pattern map; use the GIS tools:
Patterns of Economic Prosperity ($MHI) by Census Tract … the following graphic shows $MHI for a portion of the Los Angeles metro. Accommodating different demographic-economic thresholds/patterns, different legend color/data intervals are used. The pattern layer is set to 80% transparency enabling a view of earth features. Click graphic for larger view, more detail and legend color/data intervals; expand browser window for best quality view.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

See details about each option in the related Web page.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

American Community Survey 2014 Interactive Tables

.. examining demographic-economic patterns .. use the interactive tables described in this section to examine, view, compare, rank and assess demographic-economic patterns and characteristics of interest for wide-ranging geography based on ACS 2014 data.

It is very important to understand the demographic-economic make-up and patterns for wide-ranging geographies. Community and neighborhood challenges and opportunities are shaped by demographic-economic dynamics. Knowing more about “where we are now” is essential to understanding needs for policy and program management. The quality and precision of business marketing and operational plans and decisions can be improved using these data. School districts can better understand their school district community using these data. Elected officials and policymakers can better understand the needs and characteristics of constituents who they represent. Students can benefit by using these data in studies and research by attaching real world data to support, document and analyze topics of interest.

Data from the American Community Survey 2014 (ACS 2014) are key to these uses, users and processes. See more about the importance of these data. The ACS 2014 interactive tables are part of a larger set of tables comprised of multi-sourced data that are updated frequently. Additional ACS 2014 tables will be added. Join the User Group to receive updates as tables are added.

Median Household Income by ZIP Code Area; Los Angeles Area
Illustrating integration of data in tables using GIS tools & geospatial analysis. Larger view illustrates ZIP code area labeling and use of mini-profile feature.

View developed with CV XE GIS software. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

Using the Tables
The interactive tables are organized by type of geography (e.g., ZIP codes) using a standardized structure. There are four types of subject matter for each type of geography (general demographic, social, economic and housing). There is a table/web page for each combination of geography by type of subject matter.

Within each table there is a row that corresponds to a geographic area. Also within each table, columns provide geographic names and codes and a set of subject matter data standardized across all geographies. Similarly designed table controls are provided at the below the table. Usage notes are located below the table.

Terms of Use
These data may be used for any purpose, except that the data may not be bulk downloaded nor used to create similar interactive tables. There is no warranty of any type with regard to any aspect of the data, table or Web pages. The user is solely responsible for any use. It is requested that any use of any table reference the source of the data (ACS 2014), ProximityOne and a link to the Web page.

Data Analytics
ProximityOne has developed these interactive tables as part of a broader set of data analytics tools and data resources. Data shown in the tables are available in dataset structure (CSV, DBF, Excel) on a fee basis. These data are also available as data integrated into shapefiles for GIS applications and geospatial analysis. Most geographic table sections also provide access to ready-to-use GIS projects/datasets. These data are integrated with yet other data to develop/update the Situation & Outlook database and information system, ProximityOne Data Service,Situation & Outlook Metro Reports and other products. These data are also used in the ProximityOne Certificate in Data Analytics and custom service/study applications.

Where’s Waldo?
Use this interactive tool to key in an address and determine geographic codes (geocodes) that might be useful. After keying in an address, click Find button. If the address is located, the page refreshes with a set of geocodes presented below the demographic-economic statistical summary.

ACS 2014 Tables & Datasets
ACS summary data are are tabulated and released annually as 1-year and 5-year estimates. These data are all estimates, subject to errors of estimation and other errors, based on household surveys.
ACS 1-year estimates (for areas 65,000 population or more) become available in September; e.g. the ACS 2014 1-year estimates became available in September 2015.
ACS 5-year estimates (all geographies) become available in December; e.g. the ACS 2014 5-year estimates became available in December 2015.
• See this section for more information about 1-year versus 5-year estimates and comparing ACS data over time.
Table listing provided below are separated into two groups as to data source: ACS 1-year and ACS 5-year. All tables are U.S. national scope.

ACS 2014 1-Year Tables


Data in these tables are centric to mid-2014.
U.S., State, CBSA/Metro
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

114th Congressional Districts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

ACS 2014 5-Year Tables


Data in these tables are centric to mid-2012 (mid-point of survey period 2010-2014).
Census Tracts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

ZIP Code Areas
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

School Districts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

State Legislative Districts
General Demographics .. Social .. Economic .. Housing

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about using these data in context of data analytics with other geography and other subject matter.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.