Tag Archives: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Regional Economic Information System; 2015 Annual Update

.. examining patterns of economic well-being among counties and regions … per capita personal income (PCPI) is the most comprehensive measure of individual economic well-being. PCPI estimates are developed/updated annually for counties, metros, states and the U.S. PCPI estimates, available as an annual time series 1969 through 2014, are developed as a part of the Regional Economic Information System (REIS). This section provides information on accessing and using the REIS data. See related Web section for more detail and data access tools.

Visual Analysis of Per Capita Personal Income Patterns
The following map shows the Houston metro (view profile) with bold brown boundary. Counties are labeled with county name and 2014 per capita personal income.

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

• See similar view of the San Francisco Metro/Area by County
• See this section to learn about making custom metro maps.

Important Features of the REIS Data
A distinguishing characteristic of the REIS data is that they are a set of multi-sourced data organized and used to estimate personal income. Personal income, unlike money income, is income received by all persons from all sources. A second characteristic is, unlike the American Community Survey (ACS), the REIS data are not based on a sample survey but rather employer-based data and other administrative data. Third, the lengthy annual time series lends itself to use in modeling and trend analysis based on a set of consistently defined subject matter.

Accessing & Using REIS Data
Resources to analyze regional economic patterns and characteristics:
1. Use the interactive table to examine characteristics of counties, metros and states. View/rank/compare per capita personal income over time.
2. Use the metro demographic-economic profiles. Examine REIS-based personal income components in context with other subject matter. Select/view any metro via interactive table.
3. Use the REIS datasets made available as a part of the ProximityOne Data Services Program (PDS).
4. Create thematic pattern maps & perform geospatial analysis of REIS data in ready-to-use GIS projects.
5. Use ProximityOne modeling tools to forecast personal income components; assess impact of change on your interests.

More About Using GIS Resources & Pattern Analysis
The following graphics illustrate use of the REIS GIS Project (details in Web section). These views show the change in per capita personal income during the period 2008 to 2014. The underlying datasets provide annual data in most cases from 1969 through 2014. Analyze patterns for only one/any selected/ year, change or percent change over time (an average of years or selected point in time). Zoom into regions of interest, set alternative pattern views, flexibly use labels, add data from other sources.

Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-2014 by State

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-2014 by Metro

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.
See this section to learn about making custom metro maps.

Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-2014 by County

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Per Capita Personal Income: County, Metro, State Interactive Table
  — top-ranked counties based on 2014 PCPI
Use of the interactive table is illustrated in the graphic below. The GeoType feature is used to select only counties. The table is then sorted in descending order on 2014 $PCPI.

Use the main Web section interactive table to examine areas of interest. Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss use of these data using analytical tools and methods applied to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Navigating the U.S. Federal Statistical System

..  the U.S. Federal Statistical System offers a vast array of diverse data resources that are useful in wide-ranging planning and analytical applications. Many of these data resources, such as census block level demographics from the decennial census, are unique in scope and content; in many cases there are no alternative data resources.

But there are issues/challenges for the data user to navigate the Federal Statistical System. Examples … the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases total employment data by county quarterly and monthly through multiple programs. The data values differ, for methodological reasons, but the net result can be confusion. The Census Bureau releases total employment data from many statistical programs by county both annually and more frequently. Where are these alternative total employment data and how can they be accessed? How do these various measures differ and which data are right for my situation? This section provides basic statistical program information. Subsequent updates will provide more detail. See the related Web section for more information.

Navigating the U.S. Federal Statistical System
  — click to view agencies, programs, data.

This section provides an overview of the U.S. Federal Statistical System (FSS) and information that can help stakeholders navigate access to selected types of data produced by the FSS. While the FSS is focused on agencies that collect, develop and make available statistical data, there is a broader set of data and resources that relate to accessing and using these data. As technology and related data analytics resources have evolved, access to and use of these data is closely associated with the development of geographic data by Federal statistical and other agencies and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

The FSS is a decentralized set of agencies that collect, develop and make available statistical and geographic data. The OMB Office of Statistical Programs and Standards (SPS) provides a FSS coordinative role. The SPS establishes statistical policies and standards, identifies priorities for improving programs, evaluates statistical agency budgets, reviews and approves Federal agency information collections involving statistical methods, and coordinates U.S. participation in international statistical activities.

While the FSS spans more than 100 agencies, the 13 “principal statistical agencies” have statistical work as their principal mission. Excluding funding for the decennial census ($689.0 million requested for the decennial census for FY 2015), approximately 38 percent ($2,378.8 million of the $6,310.8 million total proposed for FY 2015 President’s budget request) of overall funding for Federal statistical activities (of the Executive Branch) provides resources for these 13 agencies. The principal statistical agencies include:
Census Bureau (Commerce)
Bureau of Economic Analysis (Commerce)
Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice)
Bureau of Labor Statistics (Labor)
Bureau of Transportation Statistics (Transporation)
Economic Research Service (Agriculture)
Energy Information Administration (Energy)
National Agricultural Statistics Service (Agriculture)
National Center for Education Statistics (Education)
National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/HHS)
National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics — NSF/Independent
Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics — SSA/Independent
Statistics of Income (IRS)

While the above agencies are classified as the “principal statistical agencies”, there are many other agencies that produce statistics that might be as much or more relevant to your needs. See this table that lists statistical programs and resources organized by producing agency.

New and updated Federal statistical data evolve daily. The Navigating the U.S. Federal Statistical System resource is frequently updated.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Data Analytics & API Applications

Possibly the most well known APIs (Application Programming Interface) are the Google APIs. Among these, the Google Maps API, or its use, might be the most familiar. See about integrating political/statistical geography and Google Maps API. This section reviews different types of APIs.

Data Analytics and APIs
API technology/tools play an important role in accessing and integrating geographic, demographic and economic data. APIs offer two types of benefits. For Web-based applications, APIs provide the ability for on-the-fly access to selected demographic-economic buried in otherwise large datasets that typically otherwise involve downloading and preprocessing. A second important benefit/use is to extract data from those same datasets, reconfigure the structure of the data retrieved by API and create a new dataset structure that lends itself to analytical applications.

ProximityOne Data Analytics sessions review purpose, scope, strengths, advantages & limitations of APIs described in this section. Topics included in the related Web section include:
Federal Geographic-Demographic-Economic Data Access Using APIs
REST APIs
Federal Communications Commission
Bureau of the Census … much more than Census
Bureau of Economic Analysis
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Data Access & Analytics Applications
There are hundreds more APIs available from Federal agencies and wide-ranging sources.

Using APis and GIS: Visualizing Patterns; Geospatial Analysis
The following graphic has been developed first using API tools to create the underlying datasets. While the source data used in this application could have been downloaded and processed in legacy manner, the API tools provide on-the-fly development of the data in a structure required by the GIS software. These data are then integrated into shapefiles for use with the GIS software. Once the datasets are developed, they can be used in a myriad of application, GIS and otherwise.

Patterns of Male Hispanic Population Age 5 Years by ZIP Code
— Houston, TX Area


• Click graphic for larger view with ZIP Code labels and more detail.
• The graphic shows patterns of the Male Hispanic population 5 years of age as of Census 2010.
• The view illustrates how single year of age by gender by race/origin can be visually analyzed.
• See more about these data and single year of age demographics

Examples and More Detail
See the corresponding Web section on Data Analytics & Using APIs. Many See application examples are shown there.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Regional Economic Information System Updates

Goto ProximityOne  Are we better off? … How is our per capita measure of economic prosperity trending?  Answers to these questions, helping us determine where we are and how things might change in the future are partly provided by the REIS economic data updated in November 2013. This section provides an overview of the latest  Regional Economic Information System (REIS) data and how these data compare to other data in related analyses and decision-making applications.  The REIS county-level data are annually updated by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.

The change in per capita personal income, 2008-2012, by county is shown in the map below (second map shows percent change, same period).  Per capita personal income (PCPI) is the most comprehensive measure of economic activity available at the county level for all counties in the U.S.

pcpi0812

PCPI Percent Change 2008-12 almost mirrors dollar change shown above.
pcpi0812pct

Our work with the REIS data dates to the 1970s where these data were used in state forecasting models by the State of Missouri.  Today, we integrate the REIS data into Situation&Outlook.  The REIS annual time series is an indispensable part of any continuing county and regional comprehensive modeling and analysis.

Relation to ACS
REIS and the Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year data provide an annual, but different, characterization of the county level economy.  The two sources should be used in combination; one is not better than the other.  Some selected comparisons … REIS most current data are for 2012; the ACS 2012 5-year data (December 2013) are centric to 2010.  REIS data are developed from employer reported data supplemented with other wide-ranging measures for one year; ACS 5-year estimates are based on a sample survey over a 5 year period. REIS data provide a 20+ year annual time series; ACS 5-year data are available for four years on a comparable basis.  REIS data are available for counties, metros and states; ACS 5 year data go down to block group level and cover many other types of geography.  REIS is predominantly economic; ACS data are predominately demographic. REIS metro data use the 2013 vintage metros; all available ACS 5-year data are based on the 2009/Census 2010 vintage metros.

Relation to CEW
REIS data are based substantially on employment and payroll data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Employment and Wages (CEW).  Analyses should make use of both sources.  Some comparisons … REIS data are annual only; CEW data are quarterly and annual.  REIS most current data are for 2012; CEW data are available for 1st quarter 2013; CEW will be almost two years more recent when the REIS data are released in 2014.  REIS data go to the 2-digit NAICS level; CEW data go to the 6-digit NAICS level. County is the low level geography for REIS and CEW.

Scope of REIS Data
As a generalization, the REIS data are annual time series starting in 1970 and continue to 2012.  The series are developed for many types of subject matter by county, metro and state.  The series are organized as shown below.  Click a link to view a sample profile for Harris County, TX for 2011 and 2012.

• Personal income, per capita personal income, and population (CA1-3)
• Personal income summary (CA04)
• Personal income and earnings by industry (CA05, CA05N)
• Compensation of employees by industry (CA06, CA06N)
• Economic profiles (CA30)
• Gross flow of earnings (CA91)

Access and Interactive Analysis
Use the interactive table at http://proximityone.com/reis13.htm to view, rank compare annual estimates, and change, of per capita personal income for selected years by county, metro and state.  See related maps and about mapping tools using the REIS data in that section.  The more detailed data shown in above examples are available via Situation & Outlook integrated with multi-sourced data.