Tag Archives: Americas Largest Businesses

Metropolitan Areas & Fortune 1000 Companies

.. examining Fortune 1000 companies by metro .. the mix of small and large businesses can be important to the dynamic and opportunities for any area. Larger businesses often provide a hub for the evolvement and expansion of small businesses – an important ingredient to employment growth and economic progress. Visit the related Web section for more details.

Not surprising, the New York metro leads the way with headquarters to 115 Fortune 1000 companies. Check out the full list of metros with links to the corresponding metro report.

The Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook Reports provide insights into the integrated mix of of geographic, demographic, economic and business activity and patterns for individual metropolitan areas. The reports provide a summary of Fortune 1000 companies, notable businesses, government operations and other entities impacting the metro.

This section provides a summary of the number of Fortune 1000 companies derived from individual metro reports. 152 metros have one or more Fortune 1000 companies with headquarters in the metro. View the list of metros showing the number of companies as described below.

Fortune 1000 Companies by Metro
The graphic below shows Fortune 1000 companies as red markers in context of metropolitan statistical areas. Company addresses were geocoded, determining census block code. From the census block code, the county and metro were assigned.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.
– Click graphic for larger view and bolder metro outlines.

Number of Fortune 1000 Companies by Metro
The graphic presented below shows the metros having the largest number of Fortune 1000 companies. See the full list in the related Web section. On that page, click a link to view Metro Report and list of Fortune 1000 companies located in the report (section 2). To look up metros of interest, use the all metros table.

See the related Web section for more details.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

World Statistics Day & Statisticians

Official statistics help decision makers develop informed policies that impact millions of people. Improved data sources, sound statistical methods, new technologies and strengthened statistical systems enable better decisions that eventually result in better lives for all of us. World Statistics Day was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2010 to recognize the importance of statistics in shaping our societies. October 20, 2015 marks the day around the world in over 100 countries.

More than 200 countries have national statistical agencies. Most countries have a central statistical agency. The Federal statistical system of the U.S. is highly decentralized and includes more than 120 agencies. This structure works well for the U.S. aside from certain redundancies and issues regarding public data access and use. See more about Navigating the Federal Statistical System.

Locations of America’s Largest Businesses
Statisticians collect and tabulate data about people, businesses and other entities that then enable the development of visual analysis of these data such as shown in the following graphic. This graphic shows locations of America’s largest businesses. Actuaries, economists, epidemiologists — wide-ranging occupations — develop statistical data often blurring the roles and functions between occupations.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated GIS Project
— click graphic for larger showing details.

Statisticians in the U.S.
Statisticians use statistical methods to collect and analyze data and help solve real-world problems in business, engineering, the sciences, or other fields. Statisticians are a part of the fast growing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce. Occupationally, statisticians are classified as part of the “Mathematical Science Occupations”, a part of the “Computer and Mathematical Occupations” group. The typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation is a Master’s degree.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates there are 26,970 statisticians (Occupational Employment Statistics-OES) in the U.S. with median annual wages $79,990 (May 2014). 4,190 of these statisticians are in the U.S. government Federal Executive Branch. Among metropolitan areas, the Washington, DC metro (metropolitan division) has more than twice the employment level of any other metro.

Based on data from the OES, states with the highest statistician employment levels include Maryland (2,910), California (2,680), Massachusetts (2,310), Pennsylvania (1,990) and New York (1,280). Using a base of 27,600 employment in 2012, BLS projects this occupation will grow to 35,000 (27%) by 2022. Probably low.

The OES is an establishment-based survey. The Census Bureau conducts the American Community Survey (ACS), a household survey, that also produces annual estimates of statisticians. The ACS 2014 estimated number of statisticians is 32,115 (full-time, year-round civilian employed population 16 years and over) with a median income of $83,461. The Census Bureau does not produce occupational projections.

Many statisticians remain heavily engaged in the field of statistics and data analytics through their careers but become identified in managerial and multi-occupational activities as their career advances.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.