Category Archives: Schools

National Children & Education Statistics Program Updates

.. NCES Program updates .. tools, data & methodology to examine national scope children & education .. school, school district & extended geographic-statistical data with drill-down to school and intersection level. See more about the NCES Program below.

New this Week
ACS 2015 school district demographic-economic interactive tables
– view, compare, analyze selected/all U.S. school districts
– more focused blog updates coming soon.

School Districts with Highest Median Household Income
Use the interactive table to examine economic characteristics of school districts. Below is a list of the 10 school districts having the highest median household income developed using the Economic Characteristics interactive table. Develop similar views for metros and states of interest.

– ranked on item E062 — median household income.
– click graphic for larger view.

Use GIS tools to develop thematic pattern maps such as the one shown below with NCES GIS projects. Select from hundreds of statistical measures. Create your own regional;/district views. Integrate other data.

Patterns of Economic Prosperity by School District
– median household income (item E062 in table)

– view developed with CVGIS software & related GIS project and data.
– click graphic for larger view.

See the School Districts Economic Characteristics Interactive Table.

About the National Children & Education Statistics Program
The National Children & Education Statistics (NCES) Program provides access to tools, data & methodology to examine national scope children’s demographics & education-related characteristics. These resources enable stakeholders to view and analyze detailed geographic and statistical data at the school, neighborhood, community, attendance zone, school district and higher level geography. Integrate these data with drill-down demographic-economic data to the census block and intersection levels. Examine characteristics of schools, school districts and education data with related and higher level geography including urban/rural, cities, counties, metros, state and the U.S.

See NCES Main Section.

Contents: Summary of NCES Program Resources
Click a link to view more detail on a selected topic.
Updates: New Resources, Events & Related Topics
Analytics, Blogs, Studies
Using Software Tools & Datasets
01 Mapping & Visual Analysis Tools
02 School District Annual Demographic-Economic Data Resources
03 Children’s Demographics & Living Environment by School District
04 School District Enrollment & Operational Characteristics
05 School District Finances: Sources & Uses of Funds
06 School District Geographic Size & Characteristics
07 School District-ZIP Code Area Relationship Table
08 K-12 Public Schools
09 K-12 Private Schools
10 K-12 Public School Attendance Zones
11 K-12 Public Schools by Urban/Rural Status
12 Census Tract Demographic-Economic Characteristics
13 Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook Reports

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

School District Demographic Trends: 2010-2015

.. data and tools to examine how school districts of interest are changing … based on total population, the largest 10 school districts in 2015, all experienced an increase in total population over the period 2010-2015. Five of these districts had a decrease in school age population (ages 5-17 years). Four of these districts had a decrease in the number of related children in families ages 5-17 years. See characteristics of districts in this interactive table. See the related Web section for more details.

School Districts with 2015 Population 100,000 or More
More than 600 of the total 13,245 school districts have a total 2015 population of 100,000 or more (red markers).

– view developed with CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Using New 2015 Estimates Released December 2016
– for use in 2017 ESEA Title I Allocations
Analyze annual demographic data for each U.S. school district for the period 2010 through 2015. These data include the Federal official 2015 estimates available for all districts. Developed for use as inputs for the ESEA Title I allocation formula, the data have broader uses of interest to school district demographics stakeholders. Use the interactive table in this section to view, rank, compare, query demographic characteristics of districts of interest.

The annual estimates for each school district include:
• total population
• number of children ages 5 to 17
• number of related children ages 5 to 17 in families in poverty

Using Interactive Data Tools
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query ZIP codes based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphics illustrate how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

Total Population — 10 districts with largest change 2010-15
– ranked descending on rightmost column

– click graphic for larger view.

School Age Population — 10 districts with largest change 2010-15
– ranked descending on rightmost column

– click graphic for larger view.

Related Children Ages 5-17 in Poverty
– 10 districts with largest change 2010-15
– ranked descending on rightmost column

– click graphic for larger view.

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine a set of districts on your selected criteria in for a state/area of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining K-12 Public School Characteristics; 2015 National Update

.. resources to analyze k-12 school characteristics and patterns … the U.S. national scope 2012-13 K-12 public schools dataset has just been updated (annual update). Wide-ranging characteristics of each school are now available for each of more than 102,000 schools. Use the interactive table on this Web page to view, rank, compare schools. Query for only those schools in a certain state or school district and then rank those schools on enrollment by grade, race/origin enrollment, free and reduced lunch fee participation, teachers and other subject matter.

Use the resources described here to knit together multi-sourced data to gain insights into patterns and infrastructure for the geography, population and schools of interest.

Schools in Context of Neighborhood Economic Prosperity
The following graphic shows schools in Mesa Unified, AZ (red markers) in context of median household income by census tract. The new school data are used in this application. More below about using this GIS project. Click graphic for larger view.

Ranking/Comparing Schools by Selected Area: Interactive Table
The following graphic shows schools in Mesa Unified, AZ ranked on total enrollment and showing enrollment by grade. Use the interactive table to select a district (or state, county, ZIP) of interest and examine its schools. The new school data (all U.S.) may be accessed via this interactive table. Click graphic for larger view.

Examining School Urban/Rural Patterns
The same school data accessible in the interactive table may also be used in corresponding GIS applications. The following graphic shows Mesa Unified (bold black boundary) in context of urban census blocks (orange fill pattern). Red Mountain High School (red box marker) is located at the pointer. The identify tool is used to display attributes of the school. Click graphic for larger view.

Schools may also be categorized as urban/rural using the locale code. See “School by Locale Code” layer in legend at left of the map. Different markers are used to represent different locale codes. Locale codes are further described in the K-12 schools section.

Using the Schools & Schools District GIS Project
Install the no fee Schools & Schools District GIS Project on your computer to examine statewide to neighborhood to individual school/school district characteristics. See more about installing and using the GIS resources used to develop map views shown above. Add other data, create alternative views, change marker styles, label schools/areas in different ways.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse, developer of the CV XE GIS software, is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is developer of the School District Special Tabulation under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Education. He also works with wide-ranging schools, school districts and state education agencies. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Power of Combining Maps with Data

.. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide flexible and powerful capabilities to combine maps with data. Here we review easy-to-use examples of how you can do more with GIS tools. In our increasingly data rich environment, we often experience “drowning in data.” GIS tools can help harness disparate and voluminous data and assist with data linkage.

GIS provides us with a way to improve collaboration; we can more easily comprehend and understand geographic relationships and patterns among “variables.” As we reduce tabular data to visual representations, we are better able to communicate “what the data are telling us” among stakeholders and teams/committees. This second dimension, learning what the data are telling us, provides the power of creating insights for more effective decision-making.

Toward these ends, GIS applications provide dynamic map atlas/reference maps, thematic pattern maps and geospatial analysis capabilities. Examples of these three types of GIS applications are provided below. You can explore these applications on your own computer and modify the applications to meet your own geographic and subject matter needs.

1. Install the GIS Software and Project

Install CV XE GIS (Windows-based computer)
• Create the folder c:\hawaii2014
• Expand GIS Project Fileset to c:\hawaii2014.
— requires ProximityOne User Group (join now, no fee).
• With CV XE GIS running, open the “Hawaii2014” GIS project
— File>Open>Dialog and select c:\hawaii2014\hawaii2014.gis

Start-up View: Honolulu:

Click graphic for larger view.
See more about this GIS Project.

2. Making/Using a Reference Map
With CV XE GIS running, open the Hawaii2014 GIS reference project
— File>Open>Dialog and select c:\hawaii2014\hawaii2014_reference.gis
The start-up view (below) is a reference map of the Houston, TX area. One metro is selected using a query; counties are labeled. It is easy to see the counties that comprise the Houston metro, their names and locations. Try it yourself. Navigate to any metro.

Click graphic for larger view.

3. Making/Using a Thematic Pattern Map
With CV XE GIS running, open the Hawaii2014 GIS pattern project
— File>Open>Dialog and select c:\hawaii2014\hawaii2014_pattern.gis
The start-up view (below) is a thematic pattern map of the 48 states showing metros by median household income. See color/value patterns in the legend at the left of the map panel. It is easy to see the how metros vary by median household income. Try it yourself. Change the colors/interval patterns. Label the metros with name. Zoom-in to any region. Add your own layers/data.

Click graphic for larger view.

4. Using Geospatial Analysis
With CV XE GIS running, open the Hawaii2014 GIS project
— File>Open>Dialog and select c:\hawaii2014\hawaii2014.gis
This is the basic GIS project; start SiteAnalyst: Analytics>SiteAnalyst.
The graphic below shows a site analysis view of schools selected by a circle. Attributes of the schools to analyze has been set to enrollment by grade (6 grades K-6 — upper right panel). As the selection is made, the schools are selected and enrollment summarized/aggregated (lower right grid). It is easy to see the aggregate enrollment by grade. Try it yourself. Select a different set of items to be aggregated. Select a different set of schools. Zoom-in to any area of interest. Add your own layers/data.

Click graphic for larger view.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about demographic economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Using Site Analysis Tools

.. tools that you can use for visually-based demographic-economic analysis and decision-making …
• how many of your existing/prospect client locations are in a custom defined geographic area — like 10 miles from a store location?
• how many students are enrolled in free/reduced fee lunch programs in a selection of schools in a neighborhood/area?  
• What is the population of a certain age in a set of custom selected block groups in a study area?
• What is the size of the Asian population in a group of selected counties?

These are questions that are easily answered using GIS site analysis tools that can be challenging when using tabular data files and spreadsheets. Often the selection of the geographies (schools, block groups, counties) is more easily performed with visual GIS tools rather than codes in a list. See corresponding Web page.

Visually Selecting Counties to Examine Demographic Trends

Mouse used to select areas; demographic profile at right of map.
Above application reviewed below; emulate for your areas of interest.

This section provides an overview of using the CV XE GIS Site Analysis operations with the Hawaii 2014 GIS project (see main section). The Site Analysis operations enable you to visually select multiple geographic objects (points, lines, area) that comprise a study area (e.g., a selection of 5 census tracts, a selection of 10 schools, etc.). Use the Site Analysis operations to:
• select more or different objects,
• output data records associated with selected objects,
• aggregate demographic-economic characteristics for those selected objects,
• output/save the aggregated data for the collection of selected objects.

These operations are not specific to the Hawaii 2014 GIS project (independent of any specific GIS project) but are illustrated here in context of that project.

To use this CV XE GIS feature, you must code your User Group ID (no fee, join now) in the “Key” edit box shown in the Settings>Start-Up form. This is a one-time change that enables operation of this feature.

Starting Site Analysis
With CV XE GIS running, click Analytics>SiteAnalyst. The Hawaii2014 GIS project opens. The no fee version of Site Analysis operates only with the Hawaii2014 GIS project.

Schools Application
The following steps illustrate use of Site Analysis with the public schools layer.
• click the name of the K12 public schools layer in the legend panel at left of map.
… it turns blue and is the “active” layer.
• the Site Analysis panels appear at right of map. Dbl-click “SCHID’.
• scroll down in the upper right section and select FRELCH, REDLCH, TOTFRL (illustrated in graphic below).
• in the map window, click on location shown at pointer and drag mouse to one mile radius and release.
• schools intersecting with the circle are selected; their summary characteristics are shown in the lower right grid.
• there are 8 cross-hatched (in map) schools selected, the total free and reduced lunch enrollment is 2,094 students.
• more details about the operations are covered in Web sessions.


Click graphic for larger view.

Census Tracts Application
The following steps illustrate use of Site Analysis with a census tracts layer.
• click the name of the Tracts %HS Graduate layer in the legend panel at left of map.
… it turns blue and is the “active” layer.
• the Site Analysis panels appear at right of map. Dbl-click “GEOID’.
• scroll down in the upper right section and select D028 (total population) and D039 (Asian population).
… illustrated in graphic below.
item names and descriptions shown here.
• in the map window, click on location shown at pointer and drag mouse to intersect with two tracts and release.
• tracts intersecting with the circle are selected; their summary characteristics are shown in the lower right grid.
• there are 2 cross-hatched (in map) tracts selected, the total Asian population is 4,523.
• more details about the operations are covered in Web sessions.


Click graphic for larger view.

County Application — in California
The following steps illustrate use of Site Analysis with a county layer.
• click the name of the Counties layer in the legend panel at left of map.
… it turns blue and is the “active” layer.
• the Site Analysis panels appear at right of map. Dbl-click “GEOID’.
• scroll down in the upper right section and select items illustrated in graphic below.
item names and descriptions shown here.
• in the map window, click on location shown at pointer and drag mouse to intersect with two counties and release.
• counties intersecting with the circle are selected; their summary characteristics are shown in the lower right grid.
• there are 2 cross-hatched (in map) counties selected, the total Census 2010 population was 12,828,837.
• more details about the operations are covered in Web sessions.


Click graphic for larger view.

Summary Data to Clipboard
When the lower right grid summary updates, the grid values are written to clipboard. The content of clipboard can optionally be pasted in spreadsheet software. An augmented view of the clipboard data for the above application is shown below.

Click graphic for larger view.

View/Export Selected Records for Selected Geographies
Click View File button to view the selected records (contained in the active shapefile dBASE file). The following view shows the selected records in the county application. Note that only the two records are selected. These records could optionally be exported/saved using the CopyTo button. This view illustrates use of the “Field Location Manager” (FLM) button in tool bar. Use of FLM does not affect structure of the dBASE file. Keying into a field value immediately and permanently modifies the record.

Click graphic for larger view.

More Information About Site Analysis
Only selected features of Site Analysis have been shown here. See more information at Site Analysis operations.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about demographic economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Resources to Analyze the School District Community

.. planning, gathering insights and decision-making information for the school district community … the “school district community” shares the same geographic boundary as the school district. Yet, the school district community is broader than the schools, students and educational infrastructure. It is comprised of the total population living within the school district. The school district community includes all of the housing, transportation facilities, security, recreational resources, and businesses within the school district boundaries. The geography of the school district is often different than the related city or county.

Boston Public Schools, MA 
… selected attributes about the Boston Public Schools school district ..
2013-14 school year enrollment: 54,300
Map shows patterns of economic prosperity by neighborhood.
.. ACS 2012 5-year median household income for district overall: $53,136.

School district bold black boundary; click graphic for larger view
View developed using CV XE GIS and Massachusetts DMI GIS Project.
Click this link to view detailed 5-part demographic-economic characteristics for this school district.
See related Boston community profile.
See related Suffolk county projections to 2020.

May 13 School District Community Webinar — Join us!
Join us in this no cost one-hour session — register.
Resources to analyze the School District Community & Infrastructure; topics:
– School District Demographic-Economic Profiles
– All School Districts Enrollment & Infrastructure ranking table
– 100 Largest School Districts, 2014 update extended profiles & ranking table
– School District Finances — sources and uses of funds
– relating school district finances to legislative & congressional districts
school age population by type of enrollment ACS special tabulation
– attendance area mapping; analysis of characteristics & patterns

Register for the May 13 Webinar.