Category Archives: Real Estate

Creating & Using Location Shapefiles

.. GIS tools and methods to develop and update location shapefiles .. location shapefiles are essential to most GIS applications. Location shapefiles, or point shapefiles, enable viewing/analyzing locations on a map and attributes of these locations such store or customer ID, street address, city, date updated, value, ZIP code and wide-ranging attributes about the location. This section reviews tools and methods to develop and use location shapefiles. See more detail about topics covered in this section in the related Web page.

Viewing/Analyzing Store Locations in the Dallas, TX Area
The following graphic illustrates how store locations can be shown in context of other geography and associated demographic-economic attributes. This view shows store locations (red markers) in context of Dallas city (blue cross-hatch pattern) and broader metro area. Markers shown in this view are based on a location shapefile created using steps described below. The identify tool is used to click on a location and show attributes in a mini-profile.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

View the locations contextually with thematic patterns by tract or other geography. Combine views of store, customer, agent, competitor and other location shapefiles.
The following view shows patterns of median household income by census tract.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Development of location shapefiles often starts with a list of addresses. Locations are not always address-oriented; they might be geographically dispersed measurement or transaction locations — having no address assigned. In applications reviewed here, locations are organized as rows in a CSV file. Each CSV file contains like-structured attributes for each location. The example used in this section uses store locations located in the Dallas, TX area.

There are two basic methods used to create location shapefiles: 1) geocoding address-data contained in the source data file or 2) using the latitude-longitude of the location included in the source data file record. The focus here is on option 2 — using the latitude-longitude of the location already present in the source data file.

Creating a Location Shapefile
The process of creating a location shapefile uses the CV XE GIS Manage Location Shapefile feature. With CV running, the process is started with File>Tools>ManageLocationShapefile. The following form appears.

.. ManageLocationShapefile feature/operation in ProximityOne CV XE GIS.

CV XE GIS provides other ways to create location shapefiles:
• Tools>AddShapes>Points — click points on the map window canvas.
• Tools>FindAddress — creates a single point shapefile based on specified address.
• Tools>FindAddress (Batch) — creates a point shapefile based on specified file of address records.
See details in User Guide.

Steps to Create a Location Shapefile
The process of creating the shapefile “C:\cvxe\1\locations1pts.shp” can be viewed by clicking the Run button on the form (with CV running). Two input CSV structured files are required:
• data definition file
• source data file

There are two sets of illustration location input files included with the CV installer:
• locations1_dd.csv and locations1.csv (7 locations in Johnson County, KS)
• locations2_dd.csv and locations2.csv (252 locations in Dallas and Houston)
These files are located in the \1 (typically c:\cvxe\1) folder. The marker/location shapefile used in the map shown above was created using the lcoations2 input files.

Data Definition File
The Data Definition (DD) file is an ASCII/text file structured as a CSV file. It may created with any text editor. The DD file is specific to the source data file. But in the case of recurring source data files for different periods the same DD file might apply to many source data files. There are several rules and guidelines for development of the DD file:
• there is one line/record for each field in the source data file.
• each line/record must be structured in an exact form:
.. each line/record is comprised of exactly 4 elements separated by a comma:
.. 1 field name for subject matter item
– must consist of 1 to 10 characters and include no blanks or special characters
.. 2 field type: C for character, N for numeric
.. 3 field length: an integer specifying the maximum with of the field
.. 4 maximum number of decimals for field (value is 0 for character fields)
The DD File must include three final fields:
LATITUDE,n,12,6
LONGITUDE,n,12,6
GEOID,c,15,0
The structure of these three DD file records must be as shown above. The source data file, described below, must have the LATITUDE and LONGITUDE fields populated with accurate values. The GEOID field may populated with either an accurate value of placeholder value like 0.

Example. Data for each store for the default DD file name “C:\cvxe\1\locations1_dd.csv” include the following fields/attributes:
  NAME,C,45,0
STORE,c,15,0
ADDRESS,c,60,0
CITY,c,40,0
LATITUDE,n,12,6
LONGITUDE,n,12,6
GEOID,c,15,0

Optionally create a DD File using the Create DD File button on the form. Clicking this button will create a DD File containing attributes of the dBase file specified in the associated edit box. The DD File name is created from the dBase file name. If the dBase file name is “c:\cvxe\1\locations1pts.dbf”, the DD File will be named “c:\cvxe\1\locations1pts_dd.csv”.

About the GEOID
The GEOID is a 15 character code which defines the Census 2010 census block containing each location. The GEOID is generally assigned by the ManageLocationShapefile operation and is one of the important and distinctive features of this tool. The GEOID is used to uniquely determine, with the GIS application, any of the following: state, county, census tract, block group, or census block.

The GEOID, as used in this section, is the 15 character Census 2010 geocode for the census block. The GEOID value 481130002011012 (see in location profile in map at top of section) is structured as:
state FIPS code: 48 (2 chars)
county FIPS code: 113 (3 chars)
census tract code 000201 (6 chars)
census block code: 1012 (4 chars) (block group code: 1 — first of 4 characters)

About the Source Data File
The Source Data File is an ASCII/text file structured as a CSV file. It is typically developed by exporting/saving an Excel or dBase file in CSV structure. There are several rules and guidelines for development of the source data file:
• fields must be structured and arranged as defined in the DD File.
• character fields must not contain embedded commas.
• final items in record sequence must be:
.. LATITUDE – must have accurate decimal degree value; 6 digit precision suggested.
.. LONGITUDE- must have accurate decimal degree value; 6 digit precision suggested.
.. GEOID – this may be 0, not assigned or the accurately assigned GEOID value.
– optionally create/rewrite the GEOID used in the new shapefile.

Updates; Combining Vintages of Location Attributes
Location based data might update frequently, even daily. The recommended method to add, update and extend the scope of location-based data is to create new address shapefiles corresponding to different vintages or dates covered. The structure of the files must be the same so that they files can be used together or separately. Suppose there is one set of data covering year to date and a second set of data covering the following month. The ManagePointShapefile operation would be run once for each time period. Two shapefiles would be created. These shapefiles may be added to a GIS project and used separately or in combination to view/analyze patterns.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining County Migration: 2010-2016

.. tools and data to examine U.S. by county migration 2010 to 2016 … is the population moving away or into your counties of interest? What are the trends; what is causing the change? What are the characteristics of the population moving in and out? How might this impact your living environment and business?

The total net international migration among all counties 7/1/2010 – 7/1/2016 was 5,641,260, an annual average of 940,432. The sum of net domestic migration among counties is zero by definition, but domestic migration among counties varies radically by size and direction. This section is focused on U.S. by county migration from 2010 to 2016. Migration is one component of change used to develop population estimates. See more about county population estimates and components of change in this related Web section.

Largest 10 Counties Based on 2016 Population
This table shows how domestic migration varies widely among the most populated counties. Use this interactive table to develop your own custom views for counties of interest.

Patterns of Population Change by County, 2010-2016
– the role and impact of migration
The following graphic shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2016. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Examining Population Components of Change
– net migration and natural change
Population change can be examined in terms of components of change. There are three components of change: births, deaths, and migration. The change in the population from births and deaths is often combined and referred to as natural increase or natural change. Populations grow or shrink depending on if they gain people faster than they lose them. Examining a county’s unique combination of natural change and migration provides insights into why its population is changing and how quickly the change is occurring.

Using the Interactive Table
– examining migration by county
Use the interactive table to examine characters of counties by states, metro or peer group. The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to view net migration for the Houston metro by county. The net migration button was used to select only the net migration columns, FindCBSA button used to show only counties in this metro and the final step was to sort the resulting table on 2016 population. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Housing Value Appreciation by 3-Digit ZIP Code: 2015Q3-2016Q3

.. tools, data and methods to examine housing value appreciation from 2015Q3 to 2016Q3 by 3-digit ZIP code based on the Housing Price Index (HPI).  How is the housing value changing in areas of interest?  How does housing value appreciation compare among a set of ZIP codes? Which ZIP code areas have the highest and lowest housing value appreciation in a state, region custom defined areas of interest? The HPI is calculated in part using home sales price information from Fannie Mae- and Freddie Mac-acquired mortgages. The U.S. all transactions HPI rose 5.6 percent from the 3rd quarter of 2015 to the 3rd quarter of 2016. Rank, compare, evaluate quarterly or annual housing value change for the approximate 900 3-digit ZIP code areas using the interactive table.

3-Digit ZIP Codes with Highest Housing Value Appreciation
Derived from the interactive table below this table shows the ten 3-digit ZIP codes having the highest housing value appreciation over the year 2015Q3-2016Q3. The areas are ranked on percent HPI change (rightmost column).

Gaining Insights in Housing Prices, Conditions & Markets
.. data, tools and methods to assess characteristics, patterns & trends
.. weekly Housing Data Analytics Lab sessions

Patterns of Housing Value Change by 3-Digit ZIP Code
The following graphic shows housing value appreciation 2015Q3-2016Q3 by 3-digit ZIP code based on the HPI. Use related GIS tools to zoom-in, assign labels, show in context with other geography.

– view developed using CVGIS and related GIS project.
– Click graphic for larger view and details;

Examining Housing Appreciation by 3-Digit ZIP Code
Use the interactive table below to view/rank/compare the non-seasonally adjusted “all transactions” HPI for the most recent 5 quarters for all 3-digit ZIP codes. The ranking table shows the latest quarterly HPI data and preceding quarters for one year earlier. This table will be updated on February 24, 2017, with 4th quarter 2016 data and related prior quarterly estimates and re-computed quarterly change values (last column).

Using the Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the HPI by 3-digit ZIP code interactive table. HPI data are shown for the quarterly period 2015Q3 through 2016Q3. The state selection below the table has been used to select only California ZIP codes. The Group1 button below the table has been used to select ZIP codes with a 2016Q3 HPI value of 175 ore more. The table is then sorted on the rightmost column. The resulting view shows that among all California 3-digit ZIPs having an HPI of 175 or more in 2016Q3, ZIP code 948/Richmond CA had the highest housing value appreciation — a 10.6% increase over the year.

Use the interactive table to examine states or ZIP code groups of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

ZIP Codes with Highest & Lowest Economic Prosperity

.. the latest data for ZIP Code Areas show that eleven had a median household income of $250,000 or more during the period 2011-15. More than 20 ZIP code areas had a median housing value of $2,000,000 or more. Contrast these ZIP code areas with higher economic prosperity with the more than 150 ZIP codes that had a median housing value of less than $30,000.  Use the interactive table in this related Web section to see which ZIPs meet these and other criteria.

ZIP Codes with MHI $100,000 or More; Dallas, TX Metro
Analyzing economic prosperity patterns using combined types of small area geography … the following graphic shows ZIP code areas a red markers with the median household income or $100,000 or more in context of median household income by census tract thematic pattern. Click graphic for larger view with more detail. Expand browser window for best quality view. Use CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project to develop variations of this view for your areas of interest. .

– view developed with CV XE GIS software.

This section reviews measures of economic prosperity for all ZIP code areas. These data were released in December 2016. This section updates with new data December 2017. See the list of all ZIP ccdes showing population, housing and economic characteristics in the interactive table shown below. Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare and query ZIP code attributes.

Examining demographic-economic characteristics by ZIP code is important for several reasons. We are familiar with our own ZIP codes as a geographic location. We tend to be interested in our area compared to other areas. ZIP codes provide an easy way to do that. Also, many secondary data resources are tabulated by ZIP code area; some important data are only available by ZIP code. See more about ZIP Code areas.

Resources & Methods to Examine Small Area Demographics
• See related ZIP Code Demographic-Economic Interactive Tables
  .. extended subject matter
• See related Census Tract Code Demographic-Economic Interactive Tables
• Examine ZIP Code Urban/Rural Characteristics
• Examine ZIP Code Business Establishment patterns
• Examine ZIP Code Housing Price Index patterns
• Join us in the weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
  .. reviewing applications using these and related data.

ZIP Code Areas with $MHI $100,000 or More
The following graphic shows ZIP code areas as red markers having median household income or $100,000 or more. Click graphic for larger view with more detail. Expand browser window for best quality view. Use CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project to develop variations of this view; integrate other data; select alternative ACS 2015 subject matter.

– view developed with CV XE GIS software. Click graphic for larger view.

ZIP Code Areas with $MHV Less than $30,000
The following graphic shows ZIP code areas as orange markers having median housing value of less than $30,000. Click graphic for larger view with more detail. Expand browser window for best quality view. Use CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project to develop variations of this view; integrate other data; select alternative ACS 2015 subject matter.

– view developed with CV XE GIS software. Click graphic for larger view.

ZIP Code Areas: Population & Economic Prosperity
  — Interactive Table –
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query ZIP codes based on a selection of demographic-economic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used to examine patterns of the three digit ZIP code area (San Diego) by 5-digit ZIP code. Table operations are used to select ZIP codes in the 921 3-digit area (containing 39 5-digit ZIP codes). These 39 ZIP code are then ranked in descending order on median household income. See results in the table shown below. ZIP code 92145 has the highest $MHI in this group with $228.036.

– click graphic for larger view.

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine a set of ZIP codes on your selected criteria in for a state/area of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State and Regional Decision-Making Information

Organized on a state-by-state basis, use tools and geographic, demographic and economic data resources in these sections to facilitate planning and analysis. Updated frequently, these sections provide a unique means to access to multi-sourced data to develop insights into patterns, characteristics and trends on wide-ranging issues. Bookmark the related main Web page; keep up-to-date.

Using these Resources
Knowing “where we are” and “how things have changed” are key factors in knowing about the where, when and how of future change — and how that change might impact you. There are many sources of this knowledge. Often the required data do not knit together in an ideal manner. Key data are available for different types of geography, become available at different points in time and are often not the perfect subject matter. These sections provide access to relevant data and a means to consume the data more effectively than might otherwise be possible. Use these data, tools and resources in combination with other data to perform wide-ranging data analytics. See examples.

Select a State/Area

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Topics for each State — with drill-down to census block
Visual pattern analysis tools … using GIS resources
Digital Map Database
Situation & Outlook
Metropolitan Areas
Congressional Districts
Counties
Cities/Places
Census Tracts
ZIP Code Areas
K-12 Education, Schools & School Districts
Block Groups
Census Blocks

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metropolitan Area New Residential Construction

New residential construction begins with building permits. Overall U.S. housing starts are approximately 2.5% less than permits issued (22.5% less for multi-family units). Completions are approximately 4% less than starts (7.5% less for multi-family units). During the past year-plus, “residential fixed investment” has been approximately $500 billion and remained steady at 3.1% of real Gross Domestic Product. Our focus here is on data and tools to analyze new authorized residential construction activity by metro — how might changing patterns affect you — in your metros of interest? Where are areas of highest growth by type of units in structure? What is the value of new construction; how is it trending in selected metros? See related Web section for more detail and interactive data access.

Visual Analysis of New Residential Construction by Metro
This view shows the November 2014 total building permits per 1,000 housing units (2013 estimate) by Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).

View created with CV XE GIS. Click graphic for larger view.

Building permit data (housing units authorized by building permits for new residential construction) are economic leading indicators. Investors and housing developers use these data to examine the characteristics and trends in new residential housing development. Finance and real estate professional and researchers examine building permit patterns to develop strategic insights. Government and policy makers use these data to get a pulse on markets and changing patterns to administer programs and operations. Important strengths of building permits data include very recent/current data. There is a very short time lag between the data accessibility and the reference date (November building permit data are available in December). Geographic coverage and granularity are also strengths with national scope coverage by state, metro, county and city. Seemore about these data below in this section.

Accessing & Using New Authorized Residential Construction Data
Monthly building permits data are part of the Situation & Outlook (S&O) database and information system. Access/analyze these data in context of related geographic, demographic, economic and business data. This section provides no fee access to these data via interactive table, downloadable data and GIS project. Find upcoming release dates using the Calendar and related Find Event tool.

Interactive Data Analysis
Use the interactive table to view, query, rank, compare building permit data by metropolitan area. Data are provided in the interactive table by month for January 2014 forward. Earlier data are not available for the current vintage metropolitan areas.

The following graphic illustrates use of the table. The Year/Month May 2014 is selected. Metros are then ranked in descending order on Total Units. The Houston metro (blue highlighted) had the largest number of new authorized units (5,081) among all MSAs in May 2014. Select other measures of interest to rank/compare metros.


Click graphic for larger view.

Metropolitan Area New Residential Construction GIS Project
Use the U.S. by Metropolitan Area New Authorized Residential Construction GIS project to create thematic pattern views similar to the one shown above. Zoom-in to any metro/region. Add your own data; change colors, labeling, subject matter used for pattern analysis. See details in this related Web section.

New Residential Construction Data in Metro Profiles
Building permit data are updated monthly and are a part of the S&O MetroDynamics Database and Information System. View the MetroDynamics Metro Profiles that show building permits data contextually with other geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Click a metro link in column 2 of the metro interactive table to view a Metro Profile for a metro of interest. The building permits section is populated only for Metropolitan Statistical Areas. Examples: HoustonLos AngelesSan FranciscoAtlanta.

More About These Data
See additional information about these data and their use.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. By academic background an econometrician, he has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

Pieds-à-Terres & Interpreting the Vacancy Rate

… the October 26, 2014, New York Times story Pied-à-Neighborhood states “In a three-block stretch of Midtown, from East 56th Street to East 59th Street, between Fifth Avenue and Park Avenue, 57 percent, or 285 of 496 apartments, including co-ops and condos, are vacant at least 10 months a year. From East 59th Street to East 63rd Street, 628 of 1,261 homes, or almost 50 percent, are vacant the majority of the time, according to data from the Census Bureau’s 2012 American Community Survey.” The story reviews use of these data and draws conclusions about homeowner vacancy based on these data. Read the story to get the complete picture.

There are a few issues here that may be worth considering. These issues generalize to other situations involving interpretation of vacancy rates; issues at the core of using decision-making information.

The homeowner vacancy rate is the proportion of the homeowner housing inventory which is vacant for sale. It is computed by dividing the number of vacant units for sale only by the sum of owner-occupied units and vacant units that are for sale only, and then multiplying by 100.

The area “East 56th Street to East 59th Street” between “between Fifth Avenue and Park Avenue” is also Census 2010 block group 360610112021. The area “East 59th Street to East 63rd Street” between “between Fifth Avenue and Park Avenue” is also Census 2010 block group 360610114011 and block group 360610114012. These three contiguous block groups are shown in the map graphic below — highlighted with red hatch pattern.

Three Block Group Study Area

Click graphic for larger view. View created using CV XE GIS.

Interpretation, Conclusions and Alternatives
The statement “The Census Bureau tracks vacancy rates to find out who lives in Manhattan full time.” is only loosely accurate. But accepting it, here are some other issues with the inferences made …

1. Time dimension — the 2012 American Community Survey 5-year estimates (ACS 2012) are estimates centric to 2010, not 2012, and thus 4 years old. Some respondents responded as long ago as 2008. The statistical program reference/title is 2012, but the estimates are not.

2. Estimate Margin of Error — the block group level estimates have a relatively high margin of error. The actual values might be higher or lower by a noteworthy margin.

3. More accurate vacancy rate data from Census 2010? … the Census 2010 vacancy rate data are known to relate to 2010 whereas the ACS 2012 5-year estimates are centric to 2010 but are actually for the survey period from 2008 to 2012. In addition, the Census 2010 data are available at the census block level. Finally, there is no estimation error with the Census 2010 data (since those data are not estimates).

All said and done, using Census 2010 might bolster the argument rather than diminishing it. We would need to dive into an examination of the numbers to find out more.