Category Archives: Hispanic

Low & Moderate Income Census Tracts; 2017 Update

..  data and tools to analyze characteristics and patterns of census tract geography with a focus on low and moderate income.   See related Web page for more detail.

Of the total 75,883 census tracts for which low and moderate income data were tabulated in the HMDA 2017 data, 6,023 (8.7%) were low income, 16,873 (24.5%) were moderate income, 32,509 (47.1%) were middle income and 19,159 (27.8%) were upper income. See more about these classifications. Find out about your tracts/neighborhoods of interest and how they compare to others using data and tools provided in this section.

Analysis of the low, moderate, middle, and upper income of the population and households by small area geography is important to housing market stakeholders, lenders, investors, cities/neighborhoods and others. Low and moderate income data by block group and census tract are used for compliance, eligibility determination and program performance in many Federal programs and agencies.

• Use the interactive table below to view, query, compare, sort census tracts.
• Use tract estimates & projections to examine changing characteristics.
– extended demographic-economic measures, annual 2010-2022

Low & Moderate Income by Census Tract
The following view shows census tracts designated as low and moderate income (orange fill pattern) in the the Houston, TX MSA (bold brown boundary) area. These are tracts having income level with codes 1 and 2 in the interactive table. A wide range of market insights can be created zoom-in views for counties, cities and neighborhoods and linking these with other data. Make variations of this view using ProximityOne data and tools described in this section.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

View similar maps for these areas:
.. Atlanta metro
.. Chicago, IL metro
.. Dallas, TX metro
.. Knoxville, TN metro
.. with drill-down views for Knoxville city
.. Los Angeles, CA metro
.. San Francisco, CA metro

Using the Interactive Table
  – Examining LMI Tracts in Your Metro

Use the interactive table to view, query, sort compare tracts based on various demographic and LMI characteristitcs. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used to view low and moderate income tracts for the Charlotte, NC-SC metro.
– click ShowAll button below table.
– enter a CBSA code in the edit box at right of Find CBSA LMI>.
– click the Find CBSA LMI button.
Resulting display of Charlotte metro LMI tracts only.

– click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

ZIP Codes with Highest & Lowest Economic Prosperity

.. the latest data for ZIP Code Areas show that eleven had a median household income of $250,000 or more during the period 2011-15. More than 20 ZIP code areas had a median housing value of $2,000,000 or more. Contrast these ZIP code areas with higher economic prosperity with the more than 150 ZIP codes that had a median housing value of less than $30,000.  Use the interactive table in this related Web section to see which ZIPs meet these and other criteria.

ZIP Codes with MHI $100,000 or More; Dallas, TX Metro
Analyzing economic prosperity patterns using combined types of small area geography … the following graphic shows ZIP code areas a red markers with the median household income or $100,000 or more in context of median household income by census tract thematic pattern. Click graphic for larger view with more detail. Expand browser window for best quality view. Use CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project to develop variations of this view for your areas of interest. .

– view developed with CV XE GIS software.

This section reviews measures of economic prosperity for all ZIP code areas. These data were released in December 2016. This section updates with new data December 2017. See the list of all ZIP ccdes showing population, housing and economic characteristics in the interactive table shown below. Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare and query ZIP code attributes.

Examining demographic-economic characteristics by ZIP code is important for several reasons. We are familiar with our own ZIP codes as a geographic location. We tend to be interested in our area compared to other areas. ZIP codes provide an easy way to do that. Also, many secondary data resources are tabulated by ZIP code area; some important data are only available by ZIP code. See more about ZIP Code areas.

Resources & Methods to Examine Small Area Demographics
• See related ZIP Code Demographic-Economic Interactive Tables
  .. extended subject matter
• See related Census Tract Code Demographic-Economic Interactive Tables
• Examine ZIP Code Urban/Rural Characteristics
• Examine ZIP Code Business Establishment patterns
• Examine ZIP Code Housing Price Index patterns
• Join us in the weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
  .. reviewing applications using these and related data.

ZIP Code Areas with $MHI $100,000 or More
The following graphic shows ZIP code areas as red markers having median household income or $100,000 or more. Click graphic for larger view with more detail. Expand browser window for best quality view. Use CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project to develop variations of this view; integrate other data; select alternative ACS 2015 subject matter.

– view developed with CV XE GIS software. Click graphic for larger view.

ZIP Code Areas with $MHV Less than $30,000
The following graphic shows ZIP code areas as orange markers having median housing value of less than $30,000. Click graphic for larger view with more detail. Expand browser window for best quality view. Use CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project to develop variations of this view; integrate other data; select alternative ACS 2015 subject matter.

– view developed with CV XE GIS software. Click graphic for larger view.

ZIP Code Areas: Population & Economic Prosperity
  — Interactive Table –
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query ZIP codes based on a selection of demographic-economic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used to examine patterns of the three digit ZIP code area (San Diego) by 5-digit ZIP code. Table operations are used to select ZIP codes in the 921 3-digit area (containing 39 5-digit ZIP codes). These 39 ZIP code are then ranked in descending order on median household income. See results in the table shown below. ZIP code 92145 has the highest $MHI in this group with $228.036.

– click graphic for larger view.

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine a set of ZIP codes on your selected criteria in for a state/area of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Population by Age, Gender & Race/Origin 2010-2015

.. tools to examine characteristics and patterns of U.S. & state population by age, gender & race/origin, 2010-2015 annually .. access individual state and area profiles.

What are the 10 states with the largest Hispanic population? How is Hispanic population distributed by age in the U.S. or any particular state? In which states does the Hispanic population comprise more than half of the total population? And by age? Get answers to these types of questions using data access and analytical tools described in this section.

Using the Interactive Table
The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table. Tools are used to select only 2015 and show only the total and Hispanic columns, then rank in descending order on Hispanic population. It is easy to see which states have the largest Hispanic population and in relation to the total population.

Tip of the Iceberg
It’s not just about Hispanic and total population; perform similar queries/analyses by gender and for each of the five major race groups. These data are based on the latest Census Bureau 2015 model-based population estimates released in June 2016. The data options are not limited to the 2015 data; annual revised data for 2010 through 2015 are included. Find out about the size and trends for specific age groups of interest.

More about the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to perform other types of queries/analyses described above. Click a link in the table to view an extended profile for each area. The profiles are developed using the Regional Demographic-Economic Modeling System (RDEMS). When a profile is opened (new web page), analyze these population by age by gender by race/origin in context of related wide-ranging, multi-sourced data. Access the profiles for drill-down geography including counties and other areas.

Use the RDEMS current estimates (2016) and annual 5-year projections (to 2021) to examine this same scope of subject matter to the county level.

The interactive table includes a row for the U.S. and each state. Column structure and content are described below the table.
• Click the “link” (column 3) to view the RDEMS POP1 profile.
• See about more operations and usage notes below table.

Viewing Extended Profile for an Area
Clicking the link for Arizona, as illustrated above, shows the full “POP1” table/profile for Arizona. Clicking the link is equivalent to clicking this link: http://proximityone.com/rdems/1/rdems04000pop1.htm.
  • click the above link now to view the full profile.
  • California profile
  • Texas profile
  • Access any state using the interactive table

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

How to Assess the Hispanic Vote for the 2016 Elections?

.. a good place to start finding an answer to this question is to use the Hispanic citizen voting age population (CVAP) data. We take a look at using those data here. You can use these same tools and data to examine areas of interest.

This section is focused on using census tract level CVAP data. Census tracts cover the U.S. wall-to-wall with well-defined boundaries and average 4,000 population. The 73,057 census tracts offer a good granularity to examine citizen voting age population for neighborhoods and sections of cities or counties.

While the focus is on the Hispanic population, this population group is comprised of many specific origins (more about Hispanic population by specific origin). And, although this section is focused on the Hispanic population, the CVAP data are tabulated for several race/ethnicity combinations. We could apply these same tools to other race/ethnic combinations.

%Hispanic CVAP by Census Tract; Houston Area
— in context of Texas 114th Congressional District 29 (black boundary)
.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

This map shows how Texas 114th CD 29 has many census tracts that have high concentrations and percent of Hispanic CVAP (see legend at lower right in graphic). It is easy to where the Hispanic vote potential is by tract throughout the central Houston area. Develop thematic map patterns like this for any area of the U.S. Optionally link in voting districts/precincts, state legislative districts among many others. Modify appearance with different colors, interval/color assignments, labels among other settings.

CVAP data are available for several types of geographic areas (states, counties, census tracts, block groups, among others) from the annually updated American Community Survey (ACS) CVAP special tabulation.

How to Assess the Hispanic Vote for the 2016 Elections?
Identifying the census tracts having large numbers of Hispanic CVAP and high percentages, is a step one. But an important one. The next steps involve 1) determining the scope of the registered to vote Hispanic CVAP and 2) the registered to vote Hispanic CVAP turn-out on voting day or by absentee ballot.

Use the Interactive Table to Examine Hispanic CVAP
Use the interactive table in this related section to analyze patterns among census tracts where numbers and percent of Hispanic CVAP are large. Follow these steps to analyze pattern in the central Houston:

• Click ShowAll button below table (resets table).
• Click CountyFIPS button below table.
– refreshes table with only tracts in county 48201 (Harris County/Houston).
• Click Hispanic button below table at far right.
– refreshes table with same rows but now selected columns.
• Click the “CVAP Hispanic” column header twice.
– sorts in descending order; view now appears as:

Tract 48201221300 has the highest Hispanic CVAP (3,405) among all tracts in Harris County (48201). This tract is shown in the map below (see pointer; a zoom in to the map shown above). The tract is labeled with the tract code and the Hispanic CVAP population (3,405).

Examining Texas CD 114 29 CVAP Characteristics
The CV XE GIS Site Analysis tool was used to examine CVAP characteristics for the set of census tracts intersecting with Texas CD 114 29. This is a close but rough approximation as census tracts are not fully coterminous with CD boundaries. In this case there are 136 tracts intersecting with CD 29. Approximately 98% of the composite tracts area is coincident with the CD 29 area.

In the 2014 House election, the total CD 29 votes cast was less than 50,000. The incumbent won the election with 42,000 votes. Meanwhile, the total population for the 136 tract area was 708,709, the total CVAP was 332,060 and the Hispanic CVAP was 202,495 (ACS 2014 estimates). Roughly 150,000 eligible Hispanic CVAP voters did not vote. How to assess the potential impact of a further engaged Hispanic CVAP?

Analyzing Elections/Geographic Areas of Interest
Apply these same methods to any area in the U.S. to determine those census tracts having the highest Hispanic CVAP and the *potential* to have a relatively large Hispanic Vote in the 2016 Elections.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about analyzing characteristics of the citizen voting age population. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining Neighborhood Diversity Patterns

Population race/ethnic diversity varies widely by neighborhood in the United States. This section reviews use of tools that you can use to examine patterns of neighborhood race/ethnic diversity for anywhere in the United States. There are many types of neighborhood diversity (economic, age, etc.); we examine just one here — diversity based on race/ethnicity. Using the tools and resources described in this section, you can also examine many other types of neighborhood diversity, or simply sub-county demographic-economic characteristics.

Dallas, TX Area Diversity Patterns by Neighborhood/Census Tract
Census tracts are colored based on value of the diversity index. See color patterns assigned based on diversity index values as shown in legend at left of the map. Blue tracts are most diverse; red tracts are least diverse. Tracts shown with black cross-hatched pattern are tracts with 50-percent or more Hispanic population.

Click graphic for larger view.

Click Link to View Neighborhood Diversity Patterns for Selected Metro Areas:
  • Atlanta, GA
  • Austin, TX
  • Charlotte, NC
  • Chicago, IL
  • Houston, TX
  • Los Angeles, TX
  • New York, NY
  • San Diego, CA
  • Washington, DC

Neighborhood Diversity Index
The diversity index measures the degree of racial and ethnic diversity of the population. The percentage of each race (White, Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian) and Hispanic origin/ethnicity are used to calculate the chance that any two people are from different groups. The index ranges from 0 (no diversity) to 100 (highest diversity). The diversity index is computed for each census tract using data from Census 2010 Summary File 1 Table P5.

Variation in Neighborhood Diversity
Census tract 06001437701 in Alameda County, CA has the highest diversity index (88). Of the approximate 73,000 census tracts, there are more than 800 tracts with a diversity index above 80 (highly diverse). There are more than 8,000 tracts with a diversity index below 10 (little diversity).

Visual Patterns of Neighborhood Diversity
We illustrate use of CV XE GIS with associated GIS project to visually examine patterns of diversity by census tract. We extracted the Census 2010 Table 5 data using the Demographic Economic Data Extraction API tool and then integrated those data into a U.S. by census tract shapefile. See more about the GIS project.

Relating Visual to Tabular Data
The graphic below shows diversity patterns by census tract in the Alexandria, VA area. The view of Alexandria shows census tracts with black boundary and labeled with the diversity index.

Illustrative Table P5 Mini-Profile
Census 2010 Summary File 1 Table P5 items for census tract 51-510-200900 are shown in the table below. Table P5 contains 17 data items for each tract, P0050001 through P0050017. As shown here, the total Census 2010 population of this tract was 4,693. The total non-Hispanic population was 4,534. The relatively low size of the Hispanic population suggests that this tract will have less diversity than others.

Using the GIS Resources
The Geographic Information System GIS project/files and software used to develop views shown in this section are available at no fee to members of the ProximityOne User Group. Zoom to you own areas of interest. Change labeling/colors/appearance. Add other geography. Select from other wide-ranging demographic-economic data. Join now; no fees to participate.

See more about analyzing neighborhood diversity patterns in this related Web section.

Using the Census API

The Census Bureau API is a powerful resource that enables you to flexibly and easily access wide-ranging demographic-economic data down to the census block level. The Census API is a well-designed tool geared more toward application developers. That is, you cannot enter a Web instruction that generates a profile, map or directly usable dataset. ProximityOne has developed tools you can use to do just that — at no cost. This section briefly reviews how these tools can be used. See related Web section.

Direct Use of the Census API
See this summary of how to use the API to retrieve decennial census data.
• See Census 2010 SF1 items available, documentation and examples
• See more about finding the right data.
• Join us in a Web session for overview, step-by-step & Q&A.

Visual Analysis of Block Group Demographic Patterns
The following view of the Chicago area shows patterns of Asian and Hispanic population by block group using Census 2010 Summary File 1 data. This map has been developed using data accessed via the Census API and transitioned for visual analysis using tools reviewed below. In this example, two block group layers are displayed — shown to the left of map in the legend (%Asian & %Hispanic). Color patterns assigned to interval values are shown for each layer in the legend.

Click graphic for larger view
Additional views: Asian aloneHispanic alone

Use no-cost tools available from ProximityOne to develop similar map views for your geography and subject matter. The ProximityOne tools extend the capabilities of the Census API resource by enabling the user to create a dataset and then integrate those data into a Census-sourced shapefile to geospatially analyze the data. Details follow.

1. Use Demographic-Economic Data Extraction (DEDE) Tool
The Demographic-Economic Data Extraction (DEDE), a Windows-based application, is used to programmatically control use of the Census API. The user starts DEDE, opens a geographic specifications file, a subject matter specifications file, and then clicks Run to access the specified data. The data are displayed in a spreadsheet where a row corresponds to a geographic area (block group) and columns correspond to the subject matter fields. Use the File
Optionally, stop here. You now have your dataset in Excel of CSV structure for direct use. The DEDE value-added benefit is the ability to select data by a list of geographic codes, a list of subject matter items and save the API retrieved data as a dataset — these operations are not directly available using the Census API alone.

Census 2010 SF1 Table P5
Census 2010 Summary File 1 Table P5 items for a selected area (census tract in this example) is shown below.

2. Using Census API Data & GIS; Mapping & Geospatial Analysis
After extracting the data using the Census API, visually/geospatially analyze the data using Geographic Information System GIS tools. See more about CV XE GIS software to perform these tasks — available at no fee to ProximityOneUser Group members.
Install CV XE GIS.
• Add your User Group ID to the CV XE GIS settings.
• Use the GeoGateway to add shapefiles to your GIS project.
• Use the CV XE GIS dBMerge to integrate Census API data into the shapefile.
• Make settings relevant to your needs; save your GIS project.

Zoom to areas of interest. Change labeling/colors/appearance. Set queries to filter layers showing only select geography. Add other geography.

ProximityOne User Group
Join the ProximityOne User Group to keep up-to-date with new developments relating to decision-making information resources. Receive updates and access to tools and resources available only to members. Use this form to join the User Group. There is no fee.

Support & DMI Web Sessions
Learn more about using resources described in this section. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants. We can address your specific questions about tools to visually analyze patterns.

Hispanic Population by Specific Origin

As of 2012, the total U.S. Hispanic origin population was estimated to be 60 million based on ACS2012. The U.S. Hispanic population is a mosaic of many different specific origins (e.g., Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, among many others reviewed below). This post is focused on resources to analyze the distribution of the Hispanic population by specific origin. These data, and insights from their analysis, can help groups, associations and other stakeholders better understand the distribution and characteristics of specific origin Hispanic populations to provide support and care services. The data can assist government agencies better communicate with specific Hispanic origin groups by understanding the distribution by specific origin and identify special needs by geography. They can help businesses better supply the types of products and services that might be needed and in demand for people of specific origins by geographic area.

Interactive Tables & GIS/Geospatial Analysis
Use the interactive table in this section to view, rank, compare the distribution of the Hispanic population by specific origin for the U.S. by state and county. Use the U.S. by census tract shapefile with integrated Hispanic population by specific origin data to view pattern maps and geospatially analyze the specific origin populations with GIS tools.

Visual Analysis of Hispanic Population by Specific Origin
Scroll section — click graphic for larger view and details.
Selected areas: U.S., Houston, Los Angeles, Washington …

Percent Population Mexican Origin by County; 2012

Percent Population Mexican Origin — Harris County, TX Area by Tract; 2010

Percent Population Mexican Origin — Los Angeles Area by Tract; 2010

Percent Population Hispanic Origin — Washington DC Area by Tract; 2010

Map views developed using CV XE GIS with custom developed GIS projects.

Hispanic Population by Specific Origin
ACS 1-year estimates; 2012; see trend data

Hispanic Population by Specific Origin — Interactive Table
Use this interactive table to view, rank compare the Hispanic population by specific origin by state county county. The following graphic illustrates use of the table to view the Puerto Rico Hispanic origin population for Florida ranked in descending order. Create similar views for other states and other specific origins.

Adding Depth to Insights
This section has focused on only the total population by specific origin. Extended insights are available from custom estimates using the 2012 ACS Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS2012). Custom tabulations for Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs) can provide characteristics of specific origin groups including age, employment, income, housing, among many other richer demographics.