Category Archives: Linguistic Isolation

Metro 2016 Demographic-Economic Data Analytics: Social Characteristics

.. part one of four parts focused Metro 2016 Demographic-Economic Data Analytics.  This post is on Social Characteristics; ahead: general demographics, economic characteristics and housing characteristics. See related Web section.

Patterns of Educational Attainment by Metro
The following graphic shows patterns of educational attainment (percent college graduate) by Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Legend shows color patterns associated with percent college graduate values.

– View developed using CV XE GIS software and associated GIS project.
– use these resources to develop similar views for any area.
– modify subjects, zoom, colors, labels, add your data.

A Selected Social Characteristic & How Metros Vary
In 2016, the U.S. percent college graduates was 31.3 percent (of the population ages 25 and over) while Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) ranged from 11.3% (Lake Havasu City-Kingman, AZ MSA) to 60.6% (Boulder, CO MSA). See item/column S067 in the interactive table to view, rank, compare, analyze metros based on this measure for 2016 … in context of related social characteristics. These data uniquely provide insights into many of the most important social characteristics.

Social Characteristics – Subject Matter Covered
– Households by Type
– Relationship
– Marital Status
– Fertility
– Grandparents
– School Enrollment
– Educational Attainment
– Veteran Status
– Disability Status
– Mobility; Residence 1 Year Ago
– Place of Birth
– Citizenship Status
– Year of Entry
– Region of Birth
– Language Spoken at Home
– Ancestry
– Computers & Internet Use

Metro Data Analytics
Use tools, resources and methods to access, integrate and analyze social characteristics for metropolitan areas or Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs). The table includes data for 382 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and 129 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MISAs). These data will update in September 2018.

Approximately 600 subject matter items from the American Community Survey ACS 2016 database (released September 2017) are included in these four pages/tables:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics — reviewed here
• Economic Characteristics
• Housing Characteristics
See related Metro Areas Population & Components of Change time series data.

Focusing on Specific Metros & Integrated Multi-sourced Data
While these data provide a good cross section of data on social characteristics, this access structure is a) for one time period and b) data sourced from one statistical program. Also, there is a lot going on in metros; these are typically large areas with many important and diverse smaller geographies such as cities, counties and neighborhoods among other others.

Use the Metropolitan Situation & Outlook (S&O) reports to develop extended insights. See this example of the Washington, DC MSA S&O Report. Examine trends and projections to 2030. Inegrate your own data.

Using the Interactive Table
The following example illustrates use of the metro social characteristics interactive table … try using it on areas of interest. This view, showing metros partly or entirely in Arizona, was first developed by using the state selection tool below the table Next the selected columns button the table is used to examine educational attainment columns/items. The final step was to click the header cell on the “S067” item to sort metros on percent college graduates. It is easy to determine that the Flagstaff metro has the highest percent college graduates (home to Northern Arizona University).

Data Analytics Web Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

New ACS 2015 1-Year Demographic-Economic Data

.. essential data to assess where we are, how things have changed and how things might change in the future down to the sub-neighborhood level. The American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide annually updated demographic-economic data for national and sub-national geography. ACS provides a wide range of important data about people and housing for every community across the nation. The results are used by everyone from planners to retailers to homebuilders and issue stakeholders like you. ACS is a primary source of local data for most of the 40 topics it covers, such as income, education, occupation, language and housing. ProximityOne uses ACS to develop current estimates on these topics and 5-year projections. This section is focused on ACS 2015 data access, integration and use and is progressively updated.

New ACS 2015 1-year estimates are available as of September 15, 2016.

Importance of ACS: Assessing Demographic-Economic Change
Oil prices plummeted in late 2014. How has this affected people and households in areas hardest hit? Find out for wide-ranging geographies using the ACS 2015 1-year estimates. Compare to ACS 2014 1-year estimates. Use the ACS 2016 1-year estimates (September 2017) to see how the impact has continued. Demographic-economic conditions change for many reasons; oil price changes are just one.

Keep informed about ACS developments and related tools and applications:
• Updates are sent to ProximityOne User Group members (join here).
… access special extract files and GIS projects available to members.
• ACS updates and applications are covered in the Data Analytics Blog.
• ACS data access, integration & use … join us in a Data Analytics Lab session.

In the weeks ahead, the following ProximityOne information resources will be updated with new ACS 2015 1-year data:
U.S.-State-Metro Interactive Tables
• Demographic component section of Metro Situation & Outlook Reports .. example for Dallas metro
• Housing characteristics component section of Metro Situation & Outlook Reports .. example for Dallas metro
Demographic-Economic Trend Profiles
• Special study reports.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Linguistic Isolation Patterns by Block Group

Goto ProximityOne Linguistic isolation inhibits the ability of people and households to integrate into neighborhoods, cities and living areas. Opportunities for advancement and participation in society are improved where linguistic isolation is minimal. This section describes tools and data resources to examine patterns of linguistic isolation for block group level geography.

Size and distribution data on speakers of languages other than English and on their English speaking ability are important for many reasons. These data help us understand where populations with special needs exist and how they are changing. The data are used in a wide-ranging legislative, policy, and research applications. Many legal, financial and marketing decisions involving language-based issues make use of data on language use and English-speaking ability.

Data used to analyze patterns of “household linguistic isolation” are based on the American Community Survey (ACS) 2014 5-year estimates at the block groupgeographic level. The same scope of subject matter is available for higher level geography. The following graphic shows patterns of linguistic isolation in Los Angeles County. Block groups colored in red have more than 40-percent of households where no household member age 14 years and over speaks English “very well”. Click graphic for larger view showing more detail and legend.

Patterns of Linguistic Isolation; Los Angeles County, CA

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

The next view shows a zoom-in to the vicinity of the pointer shown in the above map. This view shows block groups labeled with total population. Click graphic for larger view showing more detail and legend.

– View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Language Spoken by Households – Tabular View
The table presented below shows data from ACS Table B16002 Households by Linguistic Isolation for block group 1 in census tract 212304 (also referred to as 2123.04) in Los Angeles County (037) California (06); geoid=060372123041. This block group is shown toward the center of the above view with population 1,894. Data for this block group are shown in the rightmost column of the table below. 47.2 percent of households (803) are linguistically isolated (317+0+62).


— “Language Spoken” categories are based on four major language groups.

More About Linguistic Isolation
One definition of a “linguistically isolated household” is a household in which all adults have substantial limitation in communicating English. In the ACS data, a household is classified as “linguistically isolated” if 1) no household member age 14 years and over spoke only English, and 2) no household member age 14 years and over who spoke another language spoke English “very well”.

Like many demographic measures, linguistic isolation tends to be “masked” when analyzing data for larger geographic areas, even census tracts, are used. Block group geography provides an ability to locate linguistic isolation in sub-neighborhood areas.

Using Block Group Geography/Data
Census Block Groups sit in a “mid-range” geography between census blocks and census tracts. All cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and nest together, census blocks being the lowest common denominator for each. Block Groups (BGs) are the smallest geographic area for which annually updated ACS 5-year estimates data are tabulated.

Advantages of using BG geodemographics include the maximum degree of geographic drill-down (using ACS data) … enabling the most micro-perspective of demographics for a neighborhood or part of study area. A disadvantages of using BG estimates is that typically the smaller area estimates have a relatively higher error of estimate.

Summary of Steps to Access and Use these Data
The ACS 2014 5-year Table B16002 data can be accessed for Los Angeles County using the following API call (paste the following text into a browser and press Enter). See more about using Census API operations.

At the end of this string is the text “state:06+county:037”. Change the state and county to “state:36+county:061” to access the data for New York County, NY (Manhattan); and similarly for any any county.

The results of the API call are shown in this text file. These data are easily imported into an Excel file. The DBF version of the data were integrated into the Los Angeles County 2014 block group shapefile using the CV XE GIS software dBMerge feature. The Layer Editor was then used to develop the map legend/color intervals. Join me in aData Analytics Lab session to learn more about these steps/operations.

Weekly Data Analytics Lab Sessions
Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing block group demographics using API tools and integrating those data into analytical applications.  Learn more about integrating these data with other geography, your data and use of data analytics that apply to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Linguistic Isolation Patterns

Goto ProximityOne  Size and distribution data on speakers of languages other than English and on their English speaking ability are important for many reasons. These data help us understand where populations with special needs exist and how they are changing. The data are used in a wide-ranging legislative, policy, and research applications. Many legal, financial and marketing decisions involving language-based issues make use of data on language use and English-speaking ability.

This post reviews data useful to analyze “household linguistic isolation” based on American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates at the block group geographic level. The same scope of subject matter is available for higher level geography.  The following graphic shows patterns of linguistic isolation in Queens County, NY.  Block groups colored in red have more than 50-percent of households where no household member age 14 years and over speaks English “very well”.

Patterns of Linguistic Isolation; Queens County, NYli_queens

One definition of a “linguistically isolated household” is a household in which all adults have substantial limitation in communicating English. In the ACS data, a household is classified as “linguistically isolated” if 1) no household member age 14 years and over spoke only English, and 2) no household member age 14 years and over who spoke another language spoke English “very well”.

Like many demographic measures, linguistic isolation tends to be “masked” when analyzing data for larger geographic areas, even census tracts, are used. Block group geography provides an ability to locate linguistic isolation in sub-neighborhood areas.

Census Block Groups sit in a “mid-range” geography between census blocks and census tracts. All cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and nest together, census blocks being the lowest common denominator for each. Block Groups (BGs) are the smallest geographic area for which annually updated American Community Survey (BG) data are tabulated.

Advantages of using BG geodemographics include the maximum degree of geographic drill-down (using ACS data) … enabling the most micro-perspective of demographics for a neighborhood or part of study area. A disadvantages of using BG estimates is that typically the smaller area estimates have a relatively higher error of estimate.

Language Spoken by Households
The table presented below shows data from ACS Table B16002 Households by Linguistic Isolation for block group 1 in census tract 046300 in Queens County (081) New York (36); geoid=360810463001. This block group is shown in the above map at the pointer. Data for this block group are shown in the rightmost column of the table below. 62.8 percent of households (610) are linguistically isolated (232+60+91).

Table B16002. Household Language by Households
Item Code Item Description Households
B16002001 Total 610
B16002002   English only 12
B16002003   Spanish language 321
B16002004     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 232
B16002005     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 89
B16002006   Other Indo-European languages: 60
B16002007     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 60
B16002008     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 0
B16002009   Asian & Pacific Island languages: 217
B16002010     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 91
B16002011     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 126
B16002012   Other languages: 0
B16002013     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 0
B16002014     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 0

“Language Spoken” categories are based on four major language groups.

Next Steps
Use the CV APIGateway to access Table B16002 and related data for block groups in cities or counties of interest.  Join us in the upcoming December 17, 2013 one hour web session where we talk about using the ACS 2012 5-year demographics for small area analysis.  Those new data are scheduled to be released that day.