Category Archives: Homeownership

Tools to Analyze County Demographic-Economic Characteristics

.. demographic-economic characteristics of counties are essential for business development, market analysis, planning, economic development, program management and general awareness of patterns and trends. This section provides access to data and tools to examine these data for all counties in the U.S. This annual update includes geographic area characteristics based on ACS 2015 data.  The tools/data are organized into four related sections summarized below.

1. General Demographics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp1.htm
Patterns of School Age Population by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county general demographics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns of percent population ages 5 to 17 years of age by county — item D001-D004-D018 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

2. Social Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp2.htm 
Patterns of Educational Attainment by County
– percent college graduate
Use GIS tools to visually examine county social characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns of percent college graduate by county — item S067 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

3. Economic Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp3.htm 
Patterns of Median Household Income by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county economic characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns median household income by county — item E062 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

4. Housing Characteristics
View interactive table at http://proximityone.com/us155dp4.htm 
Patterns of Median Housing Value by County
Use GIS tools to visually examine county housing characteristics as illustrated below. The following view shows patterns median housing value by county — item E062 in the interactive table. Create your own views.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

America’s Cities: Demographic-Economic Characteristics Annual Update

.. tools and data to interactively examine demographic-economic characteristics of America’s 29,321 cities/places .. understanding demographic-economic characteristics of cities and places is essential for business development, market analysis, planning, economic development, program management and general awareness of patterns and trends. This section provides access to data and tools to examine characteristics of all cities/places in the U.S. This annual update includes data for 29,321 cities/places based on ACS 2015 data.

Accessing the Data; Using Interactive Tables
Each of the four links below opens a new page providing access to U.S. by city/place interactive tables — by type of subject matter. Use tools and usage notes below table to select operations to perform queries, sort and select columns.
General Demographics
Social Characteristics
Economic Characteristics
Housing Characteristics

How the the Tables/Data Can be Used
The following table shows data derived from the Economic Characteristics table. The top 10 cities/places having the highest median household income ($MHI) are shown. The table also shows population, median family income ($MFI) and per capita income ($PCI). The $250,000 value is a cap; the actual value is $250,000 or higher. Use the interactive tables to create similar views for states of interest. Use the button below the table to select/view cities within a selected metro. Compare attributes of cities of interest to a peer group based on population size.

Visual Analysis of City/Place Population Patterns
Use GIS resources to visually examine city/place demographic-economic patterns. The following view shows patterns of population percent change by city in the Charlotte, NC-SC metro area.

… view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
… click map for larger view and details.

Related Data
Cities/Places Main Section
Citie Population Estimates & Trends, 2010-15

More About Using These Data
Using ACS 1-year and 5-year data

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

New ACS 2015 1-Year Demographic-Economic Data

.. essential data to assess where we are, how things have changed and how things might change in the future down to the sub-neighborhood level. The American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide annually updated demographic-economic data for national and sub-national geography. ACS provides a wide range of important data about people and housing for every community across the nation. The results are used by everyone from planners to retailers to homebuilders and issue stakeholders like you. ACS is a primary source of local data for most of the 40 topics it covers, such as income, education, occupation, language and housing. ProximityOne uses ACS to develop current estimates on these topics and 5-year projections. This section is focused on ACS 2015 data access, integration and use and is progressively updated.

New ACS 2015 1-year estimates are available as of September 15, 2016.

Importance of ACS: Assessing Demographic-Economic Change
Oil prices plummeted in late 2014. How has this affected people and households in areas hardest hit? Find out for wide-ranging geographies using the ACS 2015 1-year estimates. Compare to ACS 2014 1-year estimates. Use the ACS 2016 1-year estimates (September 2017) to see how the impact has continued. Demographic-economic conditions change for many reasons; oil price changes are just one.

Keep informed about ACS developments and related tools and applications:
• Updates are sent to ProximityOne User Group members (join here).
… access special extract files and GIS projects available to members.
• ACS updates and applications are covered in the Data Analytics Blog.
• ACS data access, integration & use … join us in a Data Analytics Lab session.

In the weeks ahead, the following ProximityOne information resources will be updated with new ACS 2015 1-year data:
U.S.-State-Metro Interactive Tables
• Demographic component section of Metro Situation & Outlook Reports .. example for Dallas metro
• Housing characteristics component section of Metro Situation & Outlook Reports .. example for Dallas metro
Demographic-Economic Trend Profiles
• Special study reports.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State & Metro Demographic-Economic Interactive Tables

Goto ProximityOne   New U.S. national scope state and metropolitan area demographic-economic interactive tables are now available.  These tables include approximately 600 subject matter items derived from the American Community Survey 2012 1-year estimates.

The interactive tables are organized into four related sections:
• General Demographics
• Social Characteristics
• Economic Characteristics
• Housing Characteristics

Use the interactive ranking tables to view, query, rank, compare demographic-economic characteristics of the population and housing for states and/or metros of interest.  A scroll box is provided for each section that lists each of the subject matter items available for each area in the table.

Importance of these Data
These data provide “richer” demographic-economic characteristics for national scope states and metros. While Census 2010 provides data similar to those items in the General Demographics section, only ACS 2010, 2011, 2012 sourced data provide details on topics such as income and poverty, labor force and employment, housing value and costs, educational participation and attainment, language spoken at home, among many related items. The approximate 600 items accessible via the tract dataset are supplemented by a wide range of additional subject matter.  ACS 2013 state and metro data become available in September 2014.

Homeownership Patterns by Census Block

The homeownership rate peaked in America in 2004 at approximately 69.2 percent.  Homeownership is defined as the percent of occupied housing units (households) that are owner-occupied.  The homeownership rate in 2013 is roughly the same as in 1995. The gradual decline continues.

hvr
        Homeownership Rate 1970Q1-2013Q3 not seasonally adjusted; based on CPS/HVS

The focus of this section is on creating thematic pattern map views depicting homeownership by census block for the Washington, DC area.  This section builds on the previous post Mapping Demographic Patterns: Census Blocks.

The starting place is where Mapping Demographic Patterns: Census Blocks left off — the required software and GIS project are installed on the computer.  The next step is to start the CV XE GIS software, open the DC GIS project and set the intervals for the thematic pattern views.

To compute homeownership, the minimum required data items/fields are the number of owner-occupied housing units and the number of housing units. By examining the Census 2010 SF1 table shells (xls), these items are found in Table H4. Tenure — owner/renter occupancy of occupied units (line 9259 in the xls file).  Looking at the  SF1 technical documentation (pdf) matrix section (sequential page 483, numbered page 6-321), it is determined that the items field needed are (H0040002 + H0040003) — owner occupied housing units and H0040001 (occupied housing units).  These items are already loaded into the DC block shapefile dbf.

Intervals are defined for the map view with queries that set blue to blocks with homeownership rate of 65% or more, orange to blocks with rate 50%-65% and red to population blocks with a rate below 50%.  Zero population blocks are set to gray.  The initial view shown below tells the visual story that more of Washington, DC has a homeownership rate below the national average than above the national average — and how these homeownership rate patterns are distributed by block.

Homeownership Rate by Census Block — Washington, DC
dc_ho1

Zoom-in to area east of U.S. Capitol complex
— transparency set to 60% enabling “see through” of color patterns
— mini profile of blue block at pointer
— h0040001: 79 occupied housing units and 54 owner occupied housing units (h0040002+h0040003)

dc_ho2

Similar thematic maps showing patterns of homeownership rate by census block may be created for any area in the U.S.  Procedures to access and use these no cost resources for Census 2010 Summary File 1 census block applications are summarized in the the APIGateway Guide.

In a future post, homeownership rates will be reviewed for all states and metros, 2008 through 2012, using annual American Community Survey (ACS) data.