Category Archives: GDP

Important Upcoming Data Releases: September 2017

.. monthly updates on recent & upcoming data analytics tools & resources .. this section provides a monthly update on important new data developments and applications/developments to further their use in data analytics. A focus of this section is on new or revised geographic, demographic and economic data. Most of these data are used to develop and update ProximityOne census tract-level up demographic-economic projections to 2022 and county-level up population by single year of age projections to 2060. See about September projection updates below on this page. This section is organized into recent past data updates and upcoming (month ahead) data releases and may be updated to reflect new or extended details. See related news and updates:
• What’s New daily updates
• Situation & Outlook Calendar

See related Web section.

Recent Past Data Releases/Access

U.S. by Census Tract 2017 HMDA Low & Moderate Income (FFIEC)
• Release date — 8/17; next update — mid 2018
• 2017 annual HMDA data — covers all income levels not only LMI
• New 2017 HMDA data
• See more information – access data.

U.S. by County Population by Single Year of Age (NCHS)
• Release date — 8/22/17; next update — mid 2018
• 2010 through 2016 annual population by single year of age
• New 2016 data extending annual series 2010 forward
• See more information – access updates.

Housing Price Index (FHFA)
• Release date — 8/22/17; next update — 11/28/17
• Quarterly HPI
• New 2017Q2 data extending quarterly time series.
• See more information – access updates.

Quarterly Gross Domestic Product by State (BEA)
• Release date — 9/20/17; next update — 11/21/17
• Quarterly GDP by Industry
• New 2017Q1 data extending quarterly time series.
• See more information – access data.

Upcoming Data Releases/Access 

2017 TIGER Digital Map Database (Census)
• Expected ~ 9/7/17
• Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding & Referencing (TIGER) data.
• Geographic data; predominately shapefiles.
.. intersection to intersection road segment geography and attributes.
• New 2017 GIS/mapping shapefiles for use with wide-ranging data
.. including with Census 2010, ACS 2016 & other subject matter.
• See more information – updates to access summarized in that section.

Census of Employment and Wages (BLS/CEW)
• Release date — 9/6/17; next update — 12/5/17
• AKA ES-202 data — establishments, employment & wages by NAICS code/type of business
• U.S. by county.
• New 2017Q1 data extending quarterly time series.
• See more information.

2016 American Community Survey 1-year estimates (Census/ACS)
• Release date — 9/14/17
• Wide-ranging demographic-economic data for areas having population 65,000+
.. all states, CDs, PUMAs, MSAs and larger cities/CBSAs/school districts/counties (817 of 3142)
• New 2016 estimates.
• See more information – updates to access summarized in that section.

SY 2015-16 Annual School & School District Characteristics (NCES)
• Expected ~ 9/14/17
• National school school & school district characteristics.
• New 2015-16 school year administratively reported data.
• Schools … see more information – access updates.
• School District … see more information – access updates.

2016 Annual Gross Domestic Product by Metro (BEA)
• Release date — 9/20/17
• GDP by Industry by Metro
• New 2016 data extending time series
• See more information – access updates.

Census Tract Estimates and Projections to 2022 — ProximityOne
• Release data ~ 9/27/17
• National census tract and higher level geography demographic-economic updates
• Annual estimates & projections; 2010 through 2022
• Updated to reflect/integrate data released through 9/2017 as summarized above   • See more information.

County Population by Single Year of Age Projections to 2060 — ProximityOne
• Release data ~ 9/27/17
• National county and higher level geography demographic updates
• Annual estimates & projections; 2010 through 2060
• Updated to reflect/integrate data released through 9/2017 as summarized above.   • See more information.

Notes [goto top]
– BEA – Bureau of Economic Analysis
– BLS – Bureau of Labor Statistics
– Census – Census Bureau
– FFIEC – Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
– FHFA – Federal Housing Finance Agency
– NCES – National Center for Education Statistics
– NCHS – National Center for Health Statistics

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Metropolitan Area Gross Domestic Product: Trends & Updates

… data and analytical tools to examine Metro GDP patterns and trends.  As a policy-maker, investor, business, advisor or stakeholder, it is important to know how and where the metro economy is changing … and how one or selected metros relate to the U.S. and other metros. Is metro X changing in a different direction than metro Y? By how much, why and is there a pattern? What does the healthcare sector, for example, contribute to a metro’s gross domestic product (GDP)? How does it compare to peer metros? How is the healthcare industry trending? Metro GDP data can provide insights and answers to these important questions. Developing insights using metro GDP data — an example. See related Web section for more detail.

Change in Per Capita Real GDP by Metro, 2010-2015
The following graphic shows patterns of change in per capita real GDP by metro from 2010 to 2015. The orange and red fill patterns show metros experiencing a decrease in per capita real GDP over the period. Click graphic for larger view that shows the 2015 rank of the metro among all 382 MSAs based on 2015 per capita real GDP.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated MetroGDP GIS Project

282 metropolitan statistical areas, of the total 382, experienced an increase in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) between 2010 and 2015. Growth was led by growth in professional and business services; wholesale and retail trade; and finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing, Collectively, real GDP for U. S. metropolitan areas increased 2.5 percent in 2015 after increasing 2.3 percent in 2014. Use the interactive table and GIS project/datasets described in this section to view/analyze patterns and characteristics in metros of interest.

Illustrative GDP by Sector Trend Profiles
Real GDP by sector profiles are available for the U.S. and each state and MSA. The Metro GDP data are part of the State & Regional Income & Product Accounts (SRIPA). The following profiles illustrate these data for metros, states and the U.S.

Atlanta, GA MSA
Charlotte, NC-SC MSA
Chicago, IL MSA
Columbia, MO MSA
Houston, TX MSA
Phoenix, AZ MSA
United States
Missouri
Texas

Metro Situation & Outlook Reports
View Metro GDP Characteristics section in the Metropolitan Area Situation & Outlook Reports, providing the same scope of data as in the table below integrated with other data. See example for the Dallas, TX MSA. GDP tells an important but small part of the broader metro demographic-economic characteristics. Most metros have sub-county areas experiencing growth or activity sometimes masked when looking at the entire metro. Click a metro (metro GDP estimated for MSAs only) link in the table at upper right to view the GDP estimate in context of related subject matter.

Interactive Analysis
The following graphic shows an illustrative view of the interactive MetroGDP table. This view shows California MSAs ranked in descending order on percent change in per capita real GDP from 2010 to 2015 (ranked on far right column). Use the table to examine characteristics of metros in regions of interest. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Real Gross Domestic Product by State & Area

… tools to access and analyze GDP patterns and trends … Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a comprehensive measure of U.S. economic activity. This section provides access to annual GDP estimates for the period 2010 through 2015 and tools to analyze these data. The 2015 data are the latest estimates as of June 2016 (about these data). This section provides data and tools focused on the U.S. and states. In September 2016, this section updates to include the new 2015 estimates of metropolitan area GDP and revised historical updates. Follow this blog to receive updates. See the related Web section for more details about topics covered in this post.

Patterns of Per Capita Real GDP & Percent Change by State
The following graphic shows patterns of the 2015 per capita real GDP by state. The color patterns/intervals are shown in the inset legend. In the larger view (click graphic), states are labeled with 2015 per capita real GDP (white label) and percent change in per capita real GDP, 2010-2015. Click graphic for larger view. Expand browser to full window for best quality view. The larger view shows a mini-profile for Texas. Use the GIS tools described below to develop thematic pattern map using any combination of these items from 2000 forward.

.. view developed using the CV XE GIS software.
.. click map for larger view and details.

Importance
GDP is an important part of planning, management and decision-making in the private and public sectors. It is watched closely by all stakeholders as to how the economy is trending. By adjusting current dollar GDP to constant dollar GDP, we can better examine the trends and patterns by removing inflation from the measures. By examining GDP at the metro and sub-state area, businesses and policy-makers can better determine GDP patterns on a regional basis. Regional analysis of GDP is very important as magnitude and change vary widely. By examining the size and trends of regional real GDP on a per capita basis, we are better able to examine patterns and trends at the individual level.

Modeling, Projections & Access/Analysis/Interpretive Tools
GDP is an important part of the ProximityOne Regional Demographic-Economic Modeling System (RDEMS). The RDEMS model specifies cause and effect relationships with GDP and GDP components and other data to develop current estimates and projections.

Use these tools to access/analyze GDP characteristics and patterns:
• interactive table – access in related Web section
• analyzing patterns using GIS resources – see details in related Web ection
• RDEMS database access
.. illustrative example of GDP patterns in context with other measures
.. Texas briefing notes (see notes “Texas per capita real GDP” on that page)
.. Access briefing notes for any state

Interactive Table
Use the interactive table below to examine per capita real GDP by state in context of other states and the U.S. This table expands to include metros in September 2016. The content of the table also expands to include GDP sectors and components

Per Capita Real Gross Domestic Product by State & Area
— 2000-2015
— interactive table
The following graphic shows states ranked on percent change in per capita real GDP. Click graphic for larger view. Use the interactive table to view rankings of interest. Export the data for further analysis.

Analyzing GDP using GIS Resources
— requires Windows computer with Internet connection
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the GDP GIS project fileset
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now)
… unzip GDP GIS project files to local folder c:\gdp
3. Open the c:\gdp\us1gdp.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named c:\gdp\us1gdp.gis
4. Done. The start-up view is shown at top of this section.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

2013 Metros: Houston, TX

Goto ProximityOne  94% of the U.S. population live in metropolitan areas.  Metropolitan areas are comprised of one or more contiguous counties having a high degree of economic and social integration. This section is one in a continuing series of posts focused on a specific metropolitan area — this one on the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA.   This section illustrates how relevant Decision-Making Information (DMI) resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights.  The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro. About metros.

Focus on Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA
A thumbnail … in 2012, the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $51,004. This PCPI ranked 23rd in the United States and was 117 percent of the national average, $43,735. The 2012 PCPI reflected an increase of 4.5 percent from 2011. The 2011-2012 national change was 3.4 percent. In 2002 the PCPI of the Houston MSA was $34,696 and ranked 37th in the United States. The 2002-2012 compound annual growth rate of PCPI was 3.9 percent. The compound annual growth rate for the nation was 3.2 percent.  These data are based in part on the Regional Economic Information System (REIS).  More detail from REIS for the Houston metro at the end of this section.

Geography of the Houston MSA
The geography of the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX MSA is shown in the graphic below.  The green boundary shows the 2013 vintage metro, black boundary/hatch pattern shows the 2010 vintage boundary, counties labeled. San Jacinto County is no longer a part of the metro.

houstonmsa

Changing Metro Structures Reflect Demographic Dynamics
Click here
to view a profile for the 2013 vintage Houston metro. Use this interactive table to view demographic attributes of these counties and rank/compare with other counties.

The Census 2010 population of the 2013 vintage metro is 5,920,416 (6th largest MSA) compared to the 2012 estimate of 6,177,035 (5th largest MSA). See interactive table to examine other metros in a similar manner.

Demographic-Economic Characteristics
View selected ACS 2012 demographic-economic characteristics for the Houston metro (2010 vintage) in this interactive table.  Examine this metro in context of peer metros; e.g., similarly sized metros.  In 2012, the Houston metro had a median household income of $55,910, percent high school graduates 81.1%, percent college graduates 29.6% and 16.4% in poverty.

Houston Demographic-Economic Profiles
Use the APIGateway to access detailed ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  A partial view of the Houston 2010 metro DE-3 economic characteristics profile is shown below.  Install the no fee CV XE tools on your PC to view extended profiles for Houston or any metro. See U.S. ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.  

Houston 2010 vintage MSA Economic Characteristics
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Houston Metro Gross Domestic Product
View selected Houston 2013 vintage metro Gross Domestic Product (GDP) patterns in this interactive table.  The Houston metro 2012 real per capita GDP is estimated to be $62,438 ($385,683M real GDP/6,177,035 population).

Examining Longer-Term Demographic Historical Change
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare Census 2000 and Census 2010 population for Census 2010 vintage metros (all metros).
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare 2013 vintage metros (all metros) — Census 2000, Census 2010, 2012 estimates population and related data.

Houston Metro by County Population Projections to 2060
The graphic presented below shows county population projections to 2060 for the 2013 vintage metro.  Use this interactive table to view similar projections for all counties.  The metro population is projected to increase to 2.8 million by 2030 and to 3.4 million by 2060 based based on current trends and model assumptions. Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.

Houston Metro Population Projections by County to 2060
cbsa26420projections

Thematic Maps & Visual Analysis
The graphic below shows the 2013 vintage metro (bold boundary) counties labeled with county name and county per capita personal income (PCPI).  The legend shows the change in PCPI from 2008 to 2012.
cbsa16740ctypcpi

The above graphic illustrates the power of using visual analysis tools (CV XE GIS).  These data are from the  Regional Economic Information System (REIS) introduced earlier in this section.  Use the links shown below to examine much more detail from REIS at the metro and county level.  A thematic pattern map could be developed for any one of these items.  The REIS data are annual time series starting in 1970 and continue to 2012.  Click a link to view a sample profile spreadsheet for Harris County, TX and the Houston MSA for 2011 and 2012.
• Personal income, per capita personal income, and population (CA1-3)
• Personal income summary (CA04)
• Personal income and earnings by industry (CA05, CA05N)
• Compensation of employees by industry (CA06, CA06N)
• Economic profiles (CA30)
• Gross flow of earnings (CA91)

Join us in an Upcoming Decision-Making Information Webinar
We will review topics and data used in this section in the upcoming webinar “Metropolitan Area Geographic-Demographic-Economic Characteristics & Trends” on January 9, 2014.  This is one of many topics covered in the DMI Webinars (see more).  Register here (one hour, no fee).

About Metropolitan Areas
By definition, metropolitan areas are comprised of one or more contiguous counties. Metropolitan areas are not single cities and typically include many cities. Metropolitan areas contain urban and rural areas and often have large expanses of rural territory. A business and demographic-economic synergy exists within each metro; metros often interact with adjacent metros. The demographic-economic makeup of metros vary widely and change often.

2013 vintage metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).

2013 Metros: Charlotte, NC-SC

How will the market for single family homes in the Charlotte, NC metro change over the next 5 years? 20 years? How does the metro GDP in the Charlotte metro compare to others? What are the patterns in metro rental income and homeownership/vacancy rates? How are they trending?

2013 vintage metropolitan areas include approximately 94 percent of the U.S. population — 85 percent in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 9 percent in micropolitan statistical areas (MISAs). Of 3,143 counties in the United States, 1,167 are in the 381 MSAs in the U.S. and 641 counties are in the 536 MISAs (1,335 counties are in non-metro areas).  This section is focused on the Charlotte, NC-SC metro.  It is not intended to be a study of the metro but rather illustrate how relevant DMI resources can be brought together to examine patterns and change and develop insights.  The data, tools and methods can be applied to any metro.

Focus on Charlotte, NC MSA
The Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA is shown in the graphic below.  The green boundary shows the 2013 vintage metro, black boundary/hatch pattern shows the 2010 vintage boundary, state blue boundary, counties labeled. Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.

Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA

Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC MSA

Changing Metro Structures Reflect Demographic Dynamics
Click here
to view a profile for the Charlotte metro. The profile shows the addition of five counties relative to the Census 2010 vintage.  Use this interactive table to view demographic attributes of these counties and rank/compare with other counties.

The Census 2010 population of the 2013 vintage metro is 2,217,012 (25th largest) compared to 1,758,038 (33rd largest) based on the 2010 vintage of the metro. The Charlotte metro ranks 24th in population (2,296,569) among 2013 vintage metros based on the 2012 estimate. Several metros have 2012 population of similar size including: San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, PR, Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA, San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX, Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL, Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, CA with others quite close. See interactive table to examine other metros in a similar manner.

Demographic-Economic Characteristics
View selected ACS 2012 demographic-economic characteristics for the Charlotte metro (2013 vintage) in this interactive table.  View this metro in context of peer metros; e.g., similarly sized metros.  The Charlotte metro 2012 total population of 697,439, median household income of $50,108, percent high school graduates 88.1%, percent college graduates 31.3% and 15.2% in poverty.

Charlotte Demographic-Economic Profiles
Use the APIGateway to access detailed ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  A partial view of the Charlotte metro DE-3 economic characteristics profile is shown below.  Install the no fee CV XE tools on your PC to view extended profiles for Charlotte or any metro. See U.S. ACS 2012 demographic-economic profiles.  Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.  

Charlotte MSA Economic Characteristics
Charlotte MSA Economic Characteristics

Charlotte Metro Gross Domestic Product
View selected Charlotte metro Gross Domestic Product (GDP) patterns in this interactive table.  The Charlotte metro 2012 real per capita GDP is estimated to be $118,862.  The metro ranks 21st among all 381 metros.

Examining Longer-Term Demographic Historical Change
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare Census 2000 and Census 2010 population for Census 2010 vintage metros (all metros).
— Use this interactive table to view, rank, compare 2013 vintage metros (all metros) — Census 2000, Census 2010, 2012 estimates population and related data.

Charlotte Metro by County Population Projections to 2060
The graphic presented below shows county population projections to 2060 for the 2013 vintage metro.  Use this interactive table to view similar projections for all counties.  The metro population is projected to increase to 2.8 million by 2030 and to 3.4 million by 2060 based based on current trends and model assumptions. Viewing graphic with gesture/zoom enabled device suggested.

Charlotte Metro Population Projections by County to 2060
2060 Projections

By definition, metropolitan areas are comprised of one or more contiguous counties. Metropolitan areas are not single cities and typically include many cities. Metropolitan areas are comprised of urban and rural areas and often have large expanses of rural territory. A business and demographic-economic synergy exists within each metro; metros often interact with adjacent metros. The demographic-economic makeup of metros vary widely and change often.