Category Archives: Rural

Census Block, Block Group & Census Tract GeoDemographics

Census tracts, block groups and blocks are the important small area statistical geographic areas for which data from Census 2010 are tabulated. Data for census tracts and block groups are also tabulated annually from the American Community Survey. For example. in December 2018, we will have new “richer demographics” annual estimates centric to each year 2008 through 2015 for Census 2010 tracts and block groups … data such as educational attainment, language spoken, housing and household characteristics,  income characteristics and employment and other demographic-economic attributes.

Largest Population New York City (NYC) Census Blocks
The following graphic shows the NYC Census 2010 census block having the largest Census 2010 population that is not a group quarters population block. The Lincoln Center census block shown in the graphic (red boundary) has 4,067 population and 2,922 housing units.

– click graphic for larger view; view developed using CV XE GIS

This block (36 061 015500 6000) occupies 0.033 square miles. It has a population density of 122,333 (population per square mile). The NYC block with the largest population is on Rikers Island and has a group quarters population of 8,634 and 0 housing units. For Census 2010, there were 350,169 census blocks covering the state of New York; 13,356 census blocks were water blocks. For the State of New York, as of Census 2010 the average census block population was 55 (57 excluding water blocks).

Census 2010 and Census 2020
These geographies have generally stable geographic areas and codes from one decennial census (e.g., Census 2010) to the next (e.g., Census 2020). Many of these areas will change in terms of code and area for Census 2020, though the geographic changes will typically be small or not at all.

Census 2020 block, block group and tract codes and geometry will be available in late 2020. Initial block level demographics will be available in March 2021.

Census 2010 & Current GeoDemographics
These areas cover the U.S. from wall-to-wall and generally non-changing in terms of boundary and geographic code (geocode) until Census 2020. This section provides a summary of new Web pages with more detail about each of these geographies:
census tracts and tract codes .. 73,056 areas
census block groups and block group codes .. 217,740 areas
census blocks and block codes .. 11,078,297 areas

Each of these pages provides an interactive table to view tallies of Census 2010 for each of these small area geographies.

Combining Address Data with Small Area Geography
The address of the Office of the California Secretary of State, located at 1500 11th St, Sacramento, CA 95814, was geocoded using the APIGeocoder and converted into a shapefile for Geographic Information System applications.  The location is shown as a red marker in the map views shown below, illustrating each type of small area geography: tracts. block groups and blocks.

Census Tracts
Tracts are labeled with green tract codes. Address 1500 11th St, Sacramento, CA 95814 is shown by red marker.  The address is in tract 06067001101.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Block Groups
Block groups are labeled with red block group codes.  Tract 06067001101 is comprised of block groups: 060670011011 and 060670011012.  See pointer in map view; the block group within tract boundary.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Zoom-in to Census Block
Blocks are labeled with yellow block codes. The address is located in block 060670011011085.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Further Zoom-in Showing Streets
Streets are labeled with street names. Identify tool is used to show mini-profile for 1500 block of 11th Street.

View created using CV XE GIS.

Is the tract code 11.01 or 001101?
Both. Census tracts within a county are identified by a 4-digit basic code between 0001 and 9999, and may have a 2-digit suffix ranging from .01 to .98; for example, 6059.02. The decimal point separating the 4-digit basic tract code from the 2-digit suffix is shown in Census Bureau printed reports and maps. For geo-referencing, the decimal point is implied and does not appear; the 6-character tract code with lead zeroes is used — a character string with no blanks and all numbers.

Accessing and Using these Geographies & Related Demographics
There are several ways these geographies can be used.
• The geocodes are the “handles” to access demographic-economic statistical data.
• The geographies may be visually, geospatially, related as shapefiles.
.. the Census Bureau makes these shapefiles available for use in user appications.
.. the shapefiles typically do not include demographic-economic data.

Access Census 2010 Census Block (and Block Group/Tract) data:
• P.L. 94-171 Redistricting Data — http://proximityone.com/cen2010_pl94171.htm
• Summary File 1 — http://proximityone.com/cen2010_sf1.htm

Access Census Block Group and Tract richer demographics:
• 2016 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates
  — http://proximityone.com/acs1216.htm
• Access annual counterparts to above section
• Census blocks — http://proximityone.com/cenblk.htm
• Census block groups — http://proximityone.com/blockgroups.htm
• Census tracts — http://proximityone.com/tracts.htm

Alternatively use the Census Bureau APIs or CV XE GIS APIGateway.

Data Analytics Web Sessions
.. is my area urban, rural or …
.. how do census blocks relate to congressional district? redistricting?
.. how can I map census block demographics?
Join me in a Data Analytics Web Session, every Tuesday, where we review access to and use of data, tools and methods relating to GeoStatistical Data Analytics Learning. We review current topical issues and data — and how you can access/use tools/data to meet your needs/interests.

About the Author
Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Appalachia Region & County Population Trends

.. examining how is the Appalachia population changing and why .. Appalachia is a region that includes parts of 13 states and has long been challenged with poverty. The population of Appalachia increased from 25,184,339 in 2010 to 25,449,932 in 2015. The extended report below, developed using the ProximityOne Regional Data Analytics tool, in combination with GIS tools provide insights into why, how and where the population change has occurred since 2010.

Patterns of Appalachia County Population Trends 2010-2015
Appalachia counties are shown in the following graphic with the black bold boundary. The thematic pattern map shows how counties have gained population (blue and green) and lost population (orange and red) during the period 2010 to 2015. It is easy to see clusters of counties that are increasing or losing population and why. Counties increasing in population are shown by the dominant factor contributing to their growth — net migration or natural change (where births exceed deaths). Counties decreasing in population are shown by the dominant factor contributing to their population loss — net migration or natural change (where deaths exceed births). See more detail and access data via interactive table in the County Trends 2010-2015 section. Click graphic for larger view; expand browser window for best quality view.

.. view developed with ProximityOne CV XE GIS and related GIS project.

Summary of Population Change
Appalachia has increased in population since 2010 due to both net migration and natural increase. The analyses show that during the 2010 to 2015 period, the Appalachia population:
• increased by 1,688,832 births
• experienced 1,562,810 deaths
• had a natural increase (births less deaths) of 126,022 population
• increased by 166,990 net international migration
• increased by 53,209 net domestic migration
• had a net migration of 220,199 population

Region & County-by-County Population & Components of Change
The RDA report includes eight tables for each county and a summary for the Appalachia region. Tables displayed when using the “Population Estimates & Components” data include:
• Table 1 – total population
• Table 2 – births
• Table 3 – deaths
• Table 4 – natural change
• Table 5 – international migration
• Table 6 – domestic migration
• Table 7 – net migration
• Table 8 – group quarters population

Appalachia Counties & Region: Population Trends & Components of Change; 2010-2015
Click link below to view report. Data for all Appalachia counties, followed the regional summary, are provided table-by-table in the table sequence shown above.
Appalachia region population & components of change 2010-15

Terms of Use
The above report may be used for any purpose provided that:
1 – it is not used for commercial or consulting purposes.
2 – it is not used in funded research.
3 – all use is referenced as to source with Web URL:
— developed by ProximityOne based in part on Census Bureau data; http://proximityone.com/rda.htm.

Using the RDA Resources
Use the RDA tool to develop reports like the one shown here for counties and regions of interest. Possibly more importantly, these resources can help us examine related topics such as healthcare and education. What are the characteristics and requirements now and how are needs, services and capabilities distributed across a region? How will the population change over the next several years and possibly result in improving – or deteriorating – conditions? Use the RDA demographic insights features and predictive analytics to better assess future change and needs.

Contact ProximityOne (mention RDA in text section or call 888.364.7656) for more information about using the RDA resources or custom reports.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about accessing and using demographic-economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Data Analytics Lab session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Examining Characteristics of America’s Smaller Cities

.. As of 2014, there were 19,509 incorporated cities/places in the U.S. 12,744 (65.3%) of these cities had a 2014 population of 2,500 or less; 15,834 (81.2)%) had a population of 7,500 or less. Rank, compare, query all cities using this interactive table. Examine change since 2010. This section illustrates how to examine more detailed characteristics for any one of these cities — irrespective of population size.

Sandpoint, Idaho: Patterns of Economic Prosperity

— Sandpoint, ID shown with bold black boundary
— colors show patterns of median household income by census tract
— view developed with CV XE GIS

Sandpoint, ID, 2014 population 7,760, intersects with three census tracts.  One of these tracts completely encompasses the places of Ponderay and Kootenai, located to the northeast of Sandpoint.  The next map shows Sandpoint in context of Bonner County, ID

Sandpoint, ID Demographic-Economic Characteristics
The following graphic shows a partial view of a demographic-economic profile for Sandpoint, ID. View the full profile here. Get a profile for any U.S. city.

The profile shows demographic-economic attributes of Sandpoint based on American Community Survey (ACS) 2012 and 2013 5-year estimates. 2014 5-year estimates will be available in December 2015.

The full profile tells a lot more about the city than only population by age. These attributes include school enrollment, educational attainment, migration, language spoken at home, employment status, employment by industry, income and wide ranging housing characteristics. Get the corresponding profile for the county or adjacent city. Compare attributes side-by-side.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data.

ZIP Code Urban/Rural Demographic Patterns

More than half of U.S. ZIP Code areas are 100% rural. Nine ZIP Code areas have 100,000 or more population. ZIP Code area 10028 (Manhattan), 0.3 square mile, has density of 143,683 population per square mile. ZIP code demographics are widely used in analysis largely due to familiarity of ZIP code locations by code and availability of related data, such as address data. The Census 2010 ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) are generalized geographic representations of U.S. Postal Service ZIP Code service areas. ZCTAs can provide insights into urban/rural patterns within and among ZIP Code areas. See related Web section for more details and data access.

Of the 33,140 ZCTAs identified in Census 2010 Summary File 1, 5,236 ZCTAs were 100% urban and 17,033 ZCTAs were 100% rural. The remainder have some mix of urban/rural population. Use the interactive table in this section to examine Census 2010 ZIP Code Areas by population and housing units by urban/rural status. Land area, water area and population density are also shown.

ZIP Code Urban/Rural Visual Analysis
The graphic below shows ZIP 75034 (see also in ranking table below) located in Frisco ISD, TX area in Dallas, TX metro. ZIP Code areas red boundaries; school districts black boundaries; urban schools green markers; rural schools orange markers; urban areas orange fill pattern. It is easy to see what parts of ZIP 75034 are urban (orange) versus rural (no fill pattern).
Click graphic for larger view and details. View developed using CV XE GIS and related GIS project. See related section on K-12 schools by urban/rural status.

ZIP Code Area Urban Rural Interactive Table
The following graphic shows the ZIP Code areas with largest population as of Census 2010. See interactive table in the related Web section.

Click graphic for larger view.

Related ZIP Code Demographics Interactive Tables
General Demographics .. Social Characteristics .. Economic Characteristics .. Housing Characteristics

More about ZIP Code Areas

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about demographic economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Making Custom Congressional District Maps

.. using GIS resources to create custom congressional district maps and visually analyze urban-rural patterns …

Houston Area Texas CD 22 Intersects 3 Counties

Semi-transparent layer shows TX22 by county.
Overlayed on urban areas — orange fill patern.
See details about above map below.

Maps of the 113th congressional districts are widely available in many shapes and forms. See the CD Gallery to view patterns of economic prosperity by neighborhood for each/every 113th congressional district. Flexibly associating a congressional district boundary with related geography and subject matter requires special tools — as reviewed in this section and available to members of the ProximityOne UserGroup.

Creating congressional district maps is often specific to a particular analysis, zoom-view, labeling, combination of different geographies or other considerations. While there are no estimates of unemployment by congressional district, using GIS tools it is possible to view/geospatially analyze patterns of unemployment within a congressional district by county, census tract, block group and other geography.

Create Your Own Custom Congressional District Maps
This section reviews tools that you can use to flexibly develop your own maps that show U.S. 113th Congressional Districts of interest using Geographic Information System (GIS) tools. The GIS resources enable you to view/show the congressional district boundaries in context with roads, landmarks and other geography. Flexibly add labels. Create pattern views. Add your own data. Metro maps can be saved as a graphic and used in any manner. There are no fees to use resources described in this section.

See additional details about topics covered here in this Web page.

Examining Congressional Districts & Urban/Rural Patterns
GIS resources reviewed in this section enable you to make a map of any congressional district using the U.S. by congressional district shapefile. A second layer shows the U.S. by urban area. By using these layers in combination, you can examine urban/rural patterns by congressional district. A third layer uses the U.S. by congressional district by county shapefile. By using this layer, pattern analysis can focus on a particular part of a congressional district contained within a county as illustrated by a map view below (see #2. Houston Area; Congressional District by County). The 113th CD urban/rural mapping makes use of the latest latest smoothed boundary shapefiles (July 2014).

113th Congressional District Urban/Rural Patterns Chicago Area
 — create similar map view for any area

• Congressional districts: black boundaries with CD code/number.
• Urban areas: orange fill pattern.
• It is easy to see which congressional districts are 100% urban.

Steps to Develop Custom Congressional District Maps (requires Windows computer with Internet connection)
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the U.S. 113th Congressional Districts GIS project fileset
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now, no fee)
… unzip U.S. CD113 Urban Rural GIS project files to local folder c:\cd113_urbanrural
3. Open the c:\cd113_urbanrural\cd113_urbanrural_chicago.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named c:\cd113_urbanrural\cd113_urbanrural_chicago.gis
4. Done. The start-up view is shown above with additional instructions.

Using the CD 113 Urban/Rural Maps Projects
There are three GIS project files included with the ZIP file. Each GIS project (*.gis) includes the same set of layers/shapefiles. Only attributes of layers set by the CV XE GIS Layer Editor differ.
1. cd113_urbanrural1.gis
2. cd113_urbanrural2.gis
3. cd113_urbanrural_chicago.gis

See this Web page for details on how to modify a layer appearance (queries, labels, zoom-view, etc.)

1. Houston Area — cd113_urbanrural1.gis
When the c:\cd113_urbanrural\cd113_urbanrural1.gis is opened, the view shown below appears.
This project illustrates use of the query “GEOID=’4822′” placed on the CD113 layer displays only the congressional district Texas 22.

2. Houston Area; Congressional District by County — cd113_urbanrural2.gis
When the c:\cd113_urbanrural\cd113_urbanrural2.gis is opened, the view shown below appears.
This project illustrates use of three queries placed on the CD113 by county layer, resulting in the displays of congressional district Texas 22 by county (three color patterns).
1. query 1: CD113FP=’22’ and countyfp=’039′
2. query 2: CD113FP=’22’ and countyfp=’201′
3. query 3: CD113FP=’22’ and countyfp=’157′

3. Chicago Area — cd113_urbanrural_chicago.gis
When the c:\cd113_urbanrural\cd113_urbanrural_chicago.gis is opened, the view shown below appears.
In this project, no queries are placed on any layer.

Saving/Publishing a Map View
When you have a view that you want to save, click the Save to Image button on the toolbar. You will then be prompted for the folder and filename. Once the graphic has been saved to a folder it can be used just as any other graphic.

Saving, Closing and Opening Projects
If CV XE GIS is closed with no changes made to the project settings are saved. Reopening the project will create the same start-up view as shown above. Repeat the steps to create views for other cities.

If you have made adjustments to the project and want to save it, to be reopened later with the same view, use File>SaveAs to save a new project name. It is recommended that you do not save the project with the same name as you will not be able to recall the original start-up view.

Additional Views
Phoenix area

Los Angeles area

Houston area

Support & DMI Web Sessions
Learn more about using resources described in this section. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants. We can address your specific questions about using congressional district and urban area demographic economic data and related applications.