Category Archives: CVGIS

Urban Area Demographic Trends 2010-15

.. tools and analytics to examine all urban areas with particular focus on Urbanized Areas and demographic change between 2010 and 2015 .. examining urban areas in context of metropolitan areas .. the four fastest growing Urbanized Areas (UAs) from 2010 to 2015 were in Texas. McKinney, TX UA led the nation with an increase of 27.5% in total population. View, rank, compare 2010 and 2015 demographic characteristics for UAs using the interactive table in this related section. Urban areas (Urbanized Areas and Urban Clusters) are important for many reasons. More than metros and cities, urban area geography better reflects how the urban and rural population is changing. Both metros and cities can change geographic boundary over the years. Urban areas are based on Census 2010 and unchanging between 2010 and 2020. Annual demographic updates are available from the American Community Survey (ACS 2015).

This section is focused on tools and analytics to examine all urban areas with particular focus on Urbanized Areas and demographic change between 2010 and 2015. Use the interactive table >in the related section to view, rank, query urban areas and demographic change for larger urban areas. Use the related GIS tools and data to develop related thematic and relationship maps. Perform geospatial analysis of geographic and demographic-economic characteristics using the resources we have developed. Gain insights into patterns that might affect you. Use these resources to collaborate on how, where, what, when and why of change.

McKinney TX Urbanized Area in Context of City
The McKinney, TX UA (bold orange pattern) is shown in context of McKinney city (cross-hatched area) and other urban areas (lighter orange pattern). It is easy to see that some parts of the city are rural and that the UA extends beyond the city in many areas. See more about the McKinney UA and in comparison to other urban areas using the interactive table.


– view created using CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Most Urbanized Areas (UAs, 435 of 487) have population 65,000 population or more resulting in the availability of annual demographic-economic estimates. Data are fresher than available for smaller urban areas (ACS 5-year estimates for areas under 65,000). This means more current data to assess more recent characteristics. As annual data are available UAs enabling analysis of change over time. The “2010s” marks the first time these refreshed, time series-like data have been available for urban areas. Businesses and those examining change performing market analysis benefit from the ability to examine characteristics or urban areas in combination with counties and metros.

Houston Urbanized Area in Context of Houston Metro
The Houston metro has a bold brown boundary. It is easy to see how the Houston UA (darker orange fill pattern) geographically relates to the metro. Other urban areas (all) are shown with a lighter orange fill pattern. It is easy to see the urban/pattern character of the general region. While the Houston UA is the largest, there are four UAs that intersect with Houston metro. Use the interactive table below to view their names and characteristics.


– view created using CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Urbanized Areas tend to be associated with metropolitan areas having a similar name. But very often there are multiple UAs within a metro; sometimes one is not dominant. Often there are several UAs in a metro having similar size. Use the interactive table below to view the relationship of UAs and metros (CBSAs).

Using Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query urban areas based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

The graphic shows the urbanized areas ranked in descending order based on 2010-2015 population. The rightmost column shows the area percent change in population over the period.

Fastest Growing Urbanized Areas, 2010-15

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine urban area patterns and characteristics based on your selected criteria.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Creating Maps & GIS Projects

.. follow these steps to create custom maps & GIS projects .. while maps are “everywhere,” there is a continuing need to make new maps. Reasons for this include changing underlying geography, new features (like stores or customers to be viewed), visually examining geographic relationships not available elsewhere (e.g., census tracts and ZIP codes), different geographic depictions for an area (smoothed versus precise vertices) and other reasons. A map can provide view(s) that relate to geospatial analysis; map visualization can be indispensable (showing road features adjacent to selected properties).

View of Initial Map Objective — University Park, TX; Dallas Metro area
Census tracts (black boundary) shown with census tract code as label.

— view developed using CV XE GIS software

Follow steps in this section to make a map like above for any area in the U.S. This section provides an overview of how to use the CVGIS software to quickly build a map. It is actually more than a map, it is the process of building a GIS project. A map is one rendering that can be displayed, and optionally published, using a GIS project. Map/GIS project development steps reviewed here can be performed using the no fee CVGIS software and no fee data resources, CVGIS Levels 1 and higher can save the GIS project and have additional geography available. With geographic extension, the process illustrated here can work for any place in the world. A GIS project is a file itself that contains references to map files (shapefiles) located on your computer. Once a GIS project has been created and saved, it can be immediately opened with CVGIS using the File>Open operation. After turning your computer off, and restarting it, the GIS project can be re-opened to display the same view as saved in an earlier session.

No Previous GIS/Mapping Experience Required
This section is designed for use by anyone including those with no previous GIS/mapping experience. Requirements are a Windows computer and Internet access. This section is a part of a module used in the Certificate in Data Analytics and the CVGIS Certification Programs. Developers can also benefit from this and related tutorials to learn more about how GIS can be integrated with other data analytics tools and methods.

Making Maps Steps
The objective of this session is to develop a map (and GIS project) to view characteristics of census tract “48113019301”. The first step in making a map (GIS project) is to have a clear objective. This 11 character geocode uniquely identifies this Census 2010 census tract among all other 73,057 tracts in the U.S. See more about census tract geography and geocodes. While this application shows a process for adding only two layers, it could be extended by adding more. Similarly, while this application uses a census tract boundary files (shapefile), alternatives are census blocks, block groups, ZIP code areas, among others.

These steps should take an inexperienced user 10-15 minutes to develop a new CVGIS project view. If anything becomes confused, close the program and start over.
Step 1. Install CVGIS (1/1/2017 or later version)
Step 2. Open Base Project
Step 3. Get Census Tract Shapefile
Step 4. Get Roads Shapefile
Step 5. Modify Map View
Step 6. Optionally Save GIS Project

The view should now be similar to the view at the top of this section.

Next Steps
Try the process yourself with geography of interest to you. View/use other “Creating Maps & GIS Projects” tutorials to learn about:
• integrating subject matter
• developing and using thematic maps
• creating site profiles

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State Population & Components of Change: 2010-2016

.. data and tools to examine how state demographics are changing 2010-2016 … using the new 2016 population and components of changes estimates. The U.S. population changed from 308,758,105 (2010) to 323,127,513 (2016), a change of 14,369,408 (4.7%). Only three states lost population. See the growth rates for DC and the remaining states in this table. Highest growth rates were in D.C., North Dakota, Texas, Utah and Colorado.

Patterns of Population Change, 2010-2016, by State
The following graphic shows the percent population change by state with labels showing the rank among all states based on the percent change in population, 2010-16.

View created with CVGIS and related GIS project. Click graphic for larger view.

Resources to Analyze these Data
Use our tools to view and analyze annual population estimates, 2010 to 2016, rankings and components of change for the U.S., regions and states. Use the interactive table below in this section to view, rank, compare these data. Use the GIS tools and ready-to use project described below in this section to create maps for states and regions of interest. Create thematic maps for any of the fields/measures shown in the interactive table. Change color patterns and labels. Integrate your own data.

Using Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query states based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

The graphic shows the largest 10 states ranked in descending order based on 2016 population. The column “PopChg Rank 10b16” (second from right) shows the rank of this state, among all states, based on the population change from 2010 to 2016. The rightmost column shows the state’s rank for the period based on percent change in population over the period.

Largest 10 States based on 2016 Population

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine state patterns and characteristics based on your selected criteria.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

School District Demographic Trends: 2010-2015

.. data and tools to examine how school districts of interest are changing … based on total population, the largest 10 school districts in 2015, all experienced an increase in total population over the period 2010-2015. Five of these districts had a decrease in school age population (ages 5-17 years). Four of these districts had a decrease in the number of related children in families ages 5-17 years. See characteristics of districts in this interactive table. See the related Web section for more details.

School Districts with 2015 Population 100,000 or More
More than 600 of the total 13,245 school districts have a total 2015 population of 100,000 or more (red markers).

– view developed with CVGIS software and related GIS project.

Using New 2015 Estimates Released December 2016
– for use in 2017 ESEA Title I Allocations
Analyze annual demographic data for each U.S. school district for the period 2010 through 2015. These data include the Federal official 2015 estimates available for all districts. Developed for use as inputs for the ESEA Title I allocation formula, the data have broader uses of interest to school district demographics stakeholders. Use the interactive table in this section to view, rank, compare, query demographic characteristics of districts of interest.

The annual estimates for each school district include:
• total population
• number of children ages 5 to 17
• number of related children ages 5 to 17 in families in poverty

Using Interactive Data Tools
Use the interactive table to view, rank, compare, query ZIP codes based on a selection of demographic measures. The following graphics illustrate how the table can be used. Click graphic for larger view.

Total Population — 10 districts with largest change 2010-15
– ranked descending on rightmost column

– click graphic for larger view.

School Age Population — 10 districts with largest change 2010-15
– ranked descending on rightmost column

– click graphic for larger view.

Related Children Ages 5-17 in Poverty
– 10 districts with largest change 2010-15
– ranked descending on rightmost column

– click graphic for larger view.

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine a set of districts on your selected criteria in for a state/area of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

2016 Presidential Election – Voting & Citizen Voting Age Population by County

In 2015, the U.S. citizen voting age population (CVAP) was 227,019,486 of the total U.S. resident population of 321,418,821 (70.6%). 2016 CVAP data are not yet available. In the 2016 presidential election, 128,298,470 votes were cast — approximately 56% of the citizen voting age population. For individual counties the 2016 presidential election vote ranged from 16% of the CVAP to near 100%. Use the interactive table in this section to examine characteristics of the 2016 presidential election vote and citizen voting age population by county.

This section reviews access to tools to view/analyze characteristics of the U.S. voting population (ages 18 and older and citizen) and participation in the 2016 presidential election. Data are based on Census Bureau annual population estimates, American Community Survey 2010-14 5 year (ACS 2014) Citizen Voting Age Population (CVAP) special tabulation and 2016 presidential election results.

Visual Analysis of 2016 Presidential Election Vote by County
The following graphic shows the 2016 presidential vote as a percent of the citizen voting age population.

– Click graphic for larger view.
– View developed with CV XE GIS software.

U.S. Electorate Profile: Characteristics of the Citizen, 18 and Older Population

– based on 2015 American Community Survey 1-Year estimates
*Except where noted, “race” refers to people reporting only one race.
**Hispanic refers to the ethnicity category and may be of any race.
***Households with citizen householders.

U.S. by County Interactive Table Analysis 
Use the interactive table to examine characteristics of the 2016 presidential election vote and citizen voting age population by county. The following graphic illustrates how the table can be used to examine patterns in the Houston, TX metro by county. The Find in CBSA button is used below the table to select only counties in this CBSA/metro. The rightmost column header cell is clicked to rank counties on the voter participation rate for the 2016 presidential election.

– click graphic for larger view.

Try it yourself. Use the table to examine a set of counties in a metro or state of interest.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Census 2020 LUCA Program and You

.. what would be the financial impact of a one-percent understatement in the Census 2020 population count? Many political districts are drawn based upon population change and shifts, and allocations of government funding and services are made based upon official population data. Consider this one specific example. For each one-percent of the Atlanta MSA population missed in Census 2020, potentially due to less than fully accurate address and location data, the financial impact could be on the order of $414 million per year. How and why? At margin, each person not counted in the decennial census results in a per capita disposable income loss for the area in the magnitude of $5,494 in 2000, and $6,770 per person in 2020. 61,100 people undercounted times $6,770 yields $414 million.

This section is about the Censue 2020 Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) program and how it might impact the reduction in undercount .. and make the data more accurate for wide-ranging needs and uses. Read on for details about the LUCA program.

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA MSA
The Atlanta metro shown with black bold boundary. More about this metro.

– View developed with CV XE GIS software.
– Click graphic to view patterns of neighborhood economic prosperity.

Financial Impact Details … the 2015 per capita current transfer payments (PCTP) in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta MSA were $6,132, up from $5,494 in 2010. The PCTP figure in 2020 may be $6,770. For each one-percent of the Atlanta MSA population (61,100 people) missed in Census 2020, potentially due to less than fully accurate address and location data, the financial impact could be in the order of $414 million (61,100 x $6,770) per year as of Census 2020.  $414 million per year based on the 2020 population and PCTP.

Financial Impact in Your Areas of Interest
Estimate the financial impact in your areas of interest. Get the 2010 and 2015 population and PCTP data from the REIS Interactive Table for any county or state.  Compute the 2020 population and PCTP values, potential undercount to determine the financial impact on an area of interest

Census 2020 LUCA Overview
The Census 2020 LUCA program is an initiative of the Census Bureau, partnering with thousands of state and local governments across the U.S. At the core of this program, Census provides address list data to communities; those communities compare those data with their own data and provide address/geographic updates back to the Census Bureau.  The updated address and geographic data are integrated into the TIGER/Line files  — geographic backbone for collecting and tabulating the Census results. This important MAF/TIGER address-plus update program will help insure improved accuracy for Census 2020. LUCA is a geographic data development program engaging local communities across the U.S.

ProximityOne works with local areas to improve the TIGER/Line files leading up to Census 2020. Using the CV XE GIS software and specialized expertise, we helped hundreds of governmental units, including all of the State of Georgia, improve the coverage and content of the TIGER/Line files and thus the accuracy and completeness of Census 2010.

The Census 2020 LUCA program is starting now in 2016.  See the full schedule and related details in the LUCA Web section.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

Regional Economic Information System: Annual Updates

.. which counties are experiencing the fastest economic growth? by what economic component? what does this look like on a per capita level?

.. access & analyze economic characteristics and patterns by county and state .. annual time series 1969 through 2015 with projections.  Personal income is the income available to persons for consumption expenditures, taxes, interest payments, transfer payments to governments and the rest of the world, or for saving. Use the interactive table to examine characteristics of counties and regions of interest. The table provides access to 31 personal income related summary measures. These data are a selection of a broader set of annual time series data from the Regional Economic Information System (REIS). REIS is a part of the ProximityOne State & Regional Income & Product Accounts (SRIPA) and Situation & Outlook (S&O) featuring current (2016) estimates and demographic-economic projections. Go to table.

Visual Analysis of Per Capita Personal Income Patterns
The following map shows the Houston metro (view profile) with bold brown boundary. Counties are labeled with county name and 2014 per capita personal income.

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-2014 by County
.. relative to U.S 2008-2014 change

Click graphic for larger view. View developed with CV XE GIS software.

Interactive Analysis – County or State Profiles
The following graphic illustrate use of the interactive table to view an economic profile for Harris County, TX. Use the table to examine characteristics of any county or state. Click graphic for larger view.

Interactive Analysis
– comparing per capita personal income across counties
The next graphics illustrates use of the interactive table to rank/compare per capita personal income across counties. Rank/compare states. Choose any of the economic profile items. Click graphic for larger view.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss more details about accessing and using wide-ranging demographic-economic data and data analytics. Learn more about using these data for areas and applications of interest.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.