Category Archives: NY Queens County

Mapping Statistical Data

.. GIS tools & data resources that you can use for statistical mapping & visual data analysis … Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide flexible and powerful capabilities to combine maps with data. In our increasingly data rich environment, we often experience “drowning in data.” GIS tools can help harness disparate and voluminous data and assist with data linkage. This section provides links to other sections that provide information on no cost GIS software and “production” GIS projects and datasets that you can use.

Patterns of Per Capita Personal Income Change 2008-14 by County
— relative to U.S. PCPI 2008-14 change
To illustrate, the following graphic shows patterns of per capita personal income change 2008 to 2014 by county relative to the U.S. See more information. Click graphic for larger view with legend and additional details. Make variations of this map view using resources described in this section. Optionally integrate your own data.

— view created using CV XE GIS and associated REIS GIS Project

GIS provides us with a way to improve collaboration; we can more easily comprehend and understand geographic relationships and patterns among “variables” and statistical data. As we reduce tabular data to visual representations, we are better able to communicate “what the data are telling us” among stakeholders and teams/committees. This second dimension, learning what the data are telling us, provides the power of creating insights for more effective decision-making.

Mapping Statistical Data Topics
Most applications presented in this section involve use of Windows-based desktop GIS software. The software and GIS project files and datasets are installed on your computer. These resources are available for use by members of the User Group at no fee.  Click a link below to view additional details about a topic of interest.  There you find a description of the scope and use of the data/geography, steps to access and use the GIS projects/datasets and getting started tutorials.
World by Country
U.S. by State
U.S. by Congressional District
U.S. by Metropolitan Area
U.S. by County
U.S. by City/Place
U.S. by ZIP Code Area
State by Census Tract (each/all states)
State by Block Group
State by Census Block
K-12 Schools & School District Data Analytics

Applications make use of a range of statistical data from the Federal Statistical System, and other sources, integrated with shapefiles from the Census Bureau TIGER/Line shapefiles, OpenStreetMaps, and other sources.

Join me in a Data Analytics Lab session to discuss accessing, integrating and using these resources … and linking these data/geography with other data that relate to your situation.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

New York City: Census Block Demographics

.. census blocks are the smallest geographic areas for which decennial census data (and data from any Federal statistical program) are tabulated. Census blocks are geographically defined by the Census Bureau in coordination with local agencies. For Census 2010, there were a total of 11,078,297 census blocks covering the U.S. wall-to-wall. 541,776 of these blocks are water blocks, mainly located in coastal areas. Approximately one-third of all census blocks have zero population. See more about accessing and using census block demographics in this related Web section

Related New York City posts:
Manhattan Financial Sector Earnings – monthly/quarterly attributes
    .. examine establishment characteristics by type of business
        for any New York City borough or the metro
NYC Chelsea area and demographic analysis
Patterns of Block Group Income Inequality
    .. illustrative applications in Pelham, NY vicinity; north of NYC & NYC overall

Census block data are important to demographic/market analysis in part due to the data being counts of population and housing units rather than estimates (subject to errors of estimation). Block data are also important due to their geographic granularity, very detailed geography. Block data provide a good way to aggregate small area demographics into territories, markets and service areas using GIS tools. We have not only demographic data for blocks but also their geographic attributes: location/boundary and area. Make maps and perform geospatial analysis using census block shapefiles. Use census block geography with non-census data for wide-ranging analyses.

Largest Population New York City (NYC) Census Blocks
The following graphic shows the NYC Census 2010 census block having the largest Census 2010 population that is not a group quarters population block.
The Lincoln Center census block shown in the graphic (red boundary) has 4,067 population and 2,922 housing units.

– click graphic for larger view; view developed using CV XE GIS

This block (36 061 015500 6000) occupies 0.033 square miles. It has a population density of 122,333 (population per square mile).

The NYC block with the largest population is on Rikers Island and has a group quarters population of 8,634 and 0 housing units.

For Census 2010, there were 350,169 census blocks covering the state of New York; 13,356 census blocks were water blocks. For the State of New York, as of Census 2010 the average census block population was 55 (57 excluding water blocks).

More about census blocks. In built-up urban areas, a census block often shares a boundary with a conventional 4-sided city block. Census blocks are normally bounded by roads and in some cases other types of physical boundaries. For Census 2010, each census block is coded as urban or rural; this is the basis for defining urban or rural population and geographies such as urbanized areas. See urban population and urban/rural ZIP Codes. Census block geography nest within block groups and census tracts.

Upcoming sections will focus on accessing, integrating and using New York City block group and census tract demographic-economic data. Unlike census blocks, annually updated demographic-economic data are available for block groups and census tracts from the American Community Survey.

About the Author
— Warren Glimpse is former senior Census Bureau statistician responsible for innovative data access and use operations. He is also the former associate director of the U.S. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards for data access and use. He has more than 20 years of experience in the private sector developing data resources and tools for integration and analysis of geographic, demographic, economic and business data. Contact Warren. Join Warren on LinkedIn.

State Population 2014 & Demographic Change

.. state population dynamics are changing. Learn more about how states are changing and why — using tools and resources reviewed here. Examine how these changes might impact you.

Births as one component of change … births in the U.S. for the years 2011 through 2014 are estimated at 3.97M, 3.94M, 3.96M and 3.96M (birth rates of 12.80, 12.58, 12.54, 12.46). This relatively flat pattern varies substantially by state and region. The Northeast, Midwest and West regions experienced declining births 2010-14, while the South region had a modest increase. View extensive detail on the population and population components of change in the interactive table below. Sort, rank compare states and regions based on single years or change over time. Use our GIS project to visually examine patterns. Details below. These new 2014 state population and components of change (births, deaths, migration) estimates were released December 23 and will update with 2015 estimates in late 2015. See the related Web section with interactive table and more details.

State Migration Patterns, 2010-2014
The following view shows patterns of total cumulative state net migration for the years 2011-2014 (7/1/10 to 7/1/14). See inset legend. The label shows total state net migration for the period as a percent of 2014 total population. In expanded view, the top label shows the total state net migration for the period and the bottom label shows total state net migration for the period as a percent of 2014 total population. Use the GIS project (details below) to create views with other population and population components of change or rates for any year or year group. Label areas are desired. Add other layers such as regions or divisions. Add your own data.

View created with CV XE GIS. Click graphic for larger view with more detail.

Importance of these Data; Projecting Future Patterns
These data are important. They tell stakeholders how the population is changing, when, and where by state, multi-state regions and for the U.S.; overall. Annual measures of population change provide insights into recent patterns and how the population might change during the next few years. These data do not, in general, tell us why the population is changing. More detailed estimates of state and sub-state 2014 population by age, gender and race origin will be released between now and mid-2015.

These historical data, based on facts or near-facts, are used in models to develop projections of how the population size, characteristics and distribution might evolve in the years ahead. The projections need to be updated annually to reflect the more factually based estimates. The models endeavor to capture/specify the why of population change and how change manifests itself by age, gender and race/origin — and the all important where and when.

Selected Top 10 State Rankings

Using the GIS Resources: Flexible Visual Pattern Analysis
1. Install the ProximityOne CV XE GIS
… run the CV XE GIS installer
… take all defaults during installation
2. Download the U.S. by State Population 2014 GIS project fileset
… requires ProximityOne User Group ID (join now, no fee)
… unzip U.S. State Population GIS project files to local folder c:\popest
3. Open the c:\popest\stpop2014.gis project
… after completing the above steps, click File>Open>Dialog
… open the file named c:\popest\stpop2014.gis
4. Done. The start-up view is similar to the graphic shown at the top of this section.

Using the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, query and compare states based on detailed characteristics. The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to rank states in descending order based on population change 2010 to 2014 (see pointer in rightmost column).

Click graphic for larger view.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about demographic economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

Outlook2020 Trend Analysis

.. how will the population distribution by age in one county compare to another county, metro or region between 2010 and 2020?  This section reviews how you can perform such analyses using the no fee  Outlook2020 Trend Analysis Windows-based tools.  The Outlook2020 software accesses Web-based Outlook 2020 U.S. by county annual demographic estimates and projections, 2010 through 2020. The Outlook 2020 estimates and projections are part of the Situation & Outlook database and information system.

Analytical Features
Outlook2020 Trend Analysis operations and analytical features include:
  1. display estimates and projections in a grid.
2. show annual age-cohort population data as a percent of total population.
3. save the grid display of population or percent data as an Excel file.
4. select two or more counties and aggregate the data for the composite area.
5. create percentage views and save to Excel just like for a single county.
— features 4 and 5 enable aggregation of data to a metro or region.
6. use a metro listbox to automatically select all metro counties.
7. compare any one area with another area, optionally multi-county.
8. all U.S. counties and all metros are supported.

Start-up View
Start Outlook2020 using the desktop icon. The start-up view appears as shown below. The start-up view illustrates one of the basic features of the application. Johnson County, KS is selected in the lower left listbox. When this selection is run (dbl-click the county name), the total population by age profile is displayed in the grid. The leftmost column shows age group. The remaining columns show annual population estimates and projections to 2020. The year is shown in the top cell of the column.

Click graphic for larger view.

Percent of Total by Year
Click the “Show % of Total” button to view cells as a percent of total population.

Click graphic for larger view.

Select/Sum all Counties in a Metro
In this view, the Phoenix, AZ metro is dbl-clicked in metro listbox. The two component counties are displayed in the lower/county listbox. Multi-selecting both counties, the Run button is clicked. The grid refreshes with the sum of both counties, or the metro total. Perform a similar application for any metro.
Click graphic for larger view.

Saving Grid to Excel File — the Metro (any multi-county region)
In this view, the File>SaveGridAs feature is used to save the current grid cells to an Excel file. The file was saved as c:\outlook2020\phoenix_metro.xls; it will be used in a comparative analysis reviewed below.
Click graphic for larger view.

Grid to Excel File — a Metro Component County
In this view, the File>SaveGridAs feature is used to save the current grid cells to an Excel file. Maricopa County is dbl-clicked; the grid populates with population values for this one county. The file was saved as c:\outlook2020\maricopa.xls; it will be used in a comparative analysis reviewed below.
Click graphic for larger view.

Comparative Analysis
What part of the Phoenix metro is comprised by Maricopa County? The File>Comparative Analysis feature is used to compare Maricopa County (the numerator by cell) to the Phoenix metro (the denominator by cell). The following view shows that Maricopa County comprises 89.7 percent of the Phoenix metro population ages 0-4 years. The percent of this age group accounted for this county as a percent of total metro is slowly declining since 2010. Smaller Pinal County has a relatively increasing rate for this age group.

Click graphic for larger view.

More About Analyses & Insights
Questions that can be answered with this tool …
• what part of the Kansas City metro is comprised by the Missouri counties?
• in total population? as a percent of metro?
• how is this projected to trend 2010 through 2020?
• what do these analyses suggest about trends by age cohort by county for metro?

User Group Access
Members of the ProximityOne User Group may install the Outlook2020 software and perform operations described in this section. Join the User Group now, there is no fee. See Outlook2020 installation notes

Support & DMI Web Sessions
Learn more about using resources described in this section. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants. We can address specific questions about using metro and county demographic economic data and related applications.

See more about topics covered here in the corresponding Outlook2020 Web section.

County Population Projections 2020

.. examining county demographic trends 2010-2020: population estimates & projections by age in structured profiles.

Find out about the recent past and expected future demographic trends and patterns in your county(s) of interest. Examine the distribution of the population by 5 year age cohort, other age groups and by year.

This section reviews how you can access and use ProximityOne national scope county annual demographic estimates and projections for the period 2010 through 2020. These estimates and projections are a part of the ProximityOne Situation & Outlook program. Estimates and projections are developed using county simultaneous equation models. See methodology.

Visual Trend Analysis
The graphic below shows projected population change 2010 to 2020 by county for the south central U.S. Use CV XE GIS with ready-to-use GIS project for collaboration and visual analysis.

Click graphic for larger view of U.S. with color legend details.

User Group Access
Members of the ProximityOne User Group may access any of the total population county level profiles shown in the interactive table in the corresponding Outlook 2020 web section.  Join the User Group now, there is no fee.

Sample County Profile
The graphic shown below illustrates the projections profile structure for Jackson County, MO. Descriptive stubs at left show the age group. Columns show the estimates and projections (only a few columns appear in the graphic).

Related Demographic-Economic Projections
More about ProximityOne demographic-economic estimates and projections:
• Outlook 2018 | Outlook 2030 | Outlook 2060 | Quarterly 3 year
• integrated multi-sourced Situation & Outlook demographic-economic data

County Demographic Estimates & Projections Interactive Table
The graphic shown below illustrates structure/use of the interactive table. Click graphic to open the table (http://proximityone.com/outlook2020.htm). Navigate to a county of interest in the table. Clicking a link shown in the table opens a new page showing demographic patterns and trends for that county. All links require a userid and password. Members of the ProximityOne User Group may use their userid and password to view the Total population profile. Access to other profiles is available on a fee basis.

Terms of Use. Estimates and projections described in this section and in related files are proprietary to ProximityOne. The data may be used in any manner without further authorization except that the data may not be redistributed. There is no warranty or guarantee of any type. The user is solely responsible for any use.

Support & DMI Web Sessions
Learn more about using resources described in this section. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants. We can address your specific questions about using demographic economic data and related applications.

Linguistic Isolation Patterns

Goto ProximityOne  Size and distribution data on speakers of languages other than English and on their English speaking ability are important for many reasons. These data help us understand where populations with special needs exist and how they are changing. The data are used in a wide-ranging legislative, policy, and research applications. Many legal, financial and marketing decisions involving language-based issues make use of data on language use and English-speaking ability.

This post reviews data useful to analyze “household linguistic isolation” based on American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates at the block group geographic level. The same scope of subject matter is available for higher level geography.  The following graphic shows patterns of linguistic isolation in Queens County, NY.  Block groups colored in red have more than 50-percent of households where no household member age 14 years and over speaks English “very well”.

Patterns of Linguistic Isolation; Queens County, NYli_queens

One definition of a “linguistically isolated household” is a household in which all adults have substantial limitation in communicating English. In the ACS data, a household is classified as “linguistically isolated” if 1) no household member age 14 years and over spoke only English, and 2) no household member age 14 years and over who spoke another language spoke English “very well”.

Like many demographic measures, linguistic isolation tends to be “masked” when analyzing data for larger geographic areas, even census tracts, are used. Block group geography provides an ability to locate linguistic isolation in sub-neighborhood areas.

Census Block Groups sit in a “mid-range” geography between census blocks and census tracts. All cover the U.S. wall-to-wall and nest together, census blocks being the lowest common denominator for each. Block Groups (BGs) are the smallest geographic area for which annually updated American Community Survey (BG) data are tabulated.

Advantages of using BG geodemographics include the maximum degree of geographic drill-down (using ACS data) … enabling the most micro-perspective of demographics for a neighborhood or part of study area. A disadvantages of using BG estimates is that typically the smaller area estimates have a relatively higher error of estimate.

Language Spoken by Households
The table presented below shows data from ACS Table B16002 Households by Linguistic Isolation for block group 1 in census tract 046300 in Queens County (081) New York (36); geoid=360810463001. This block group is shown in the above map at the pointer. Data for this block group are shown in the rightmost column of the table below. 62.8 percent of households (610) are linguistically isolated (232+60+91).

Table B16002. Household Language by Households
Item Code Item Description Households
B16002001 Total 610
B16002002   English only 12
B16002003   Spanish language 321
B16002004     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 232
B16002005     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 89
B16002006   Other Indo-European languages: 60
B16002007     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 60
B16002008     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 0
B16002009   Asian & Pacific Island languages: 217
B16002010     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 91
B16002011     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 126
B16002012   Other languages: 0
B16002013     No one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 0
B16002014     At least one person 14 and over speaks English only or speaks English “very well” 0

“Language Spoken” categories are based on four major language groups.

Next Steps
Use the CV APIGateway to access Table B16002 and related data for block groups in cities or counties of interest.  Join us in the upcoming December 17, 2013 one hour web session where we talk about using the ACS 2012 5-year demographics for small area analysis.  Those new data are scheduled to be released that day.