State-to-State Geographic Mobility: Migration Flows

.. migration data are one of the key components (births, deaths, migration) in estimating and projecting population using model-based methods.  It is the most challenging component of population change to project/forecast.  Migration data that we can “observe” are important in determining how migration has been trending and how it might change in the future for any given state or sub-state area. State-to-state and county-to-county migration flows data are important in their own right. These data tell us about where the population is moving to or from and can help develop insights into the “why” of migration from one area to another … and learn about net migration flows.

In 2013, there were an estimated 548,034 people who moved from a residence 1 year earlier, in a different state, to Texas. Texas experienced the largest number of movers (inflows) from other states among all states. 66,318 of these movers were from California. Use the interactive table to examine similar characteristics for any state. These data are based on the 2013 American Community Survey. See related data. See the related Web section for more detail about topics reviewed here and interactive access to migration data.

New York State OutMigration by Destination State

View created with CV XE GIS. Click graphic for larger view with more detail.

Visual Analysis of Mobility Patterns
The above view shows patterns of New York state outmigration by destination state. See inset legend. Note the legend shows only those states that account for 2% or more of New York out migration. Florida is the largest New York 2013 out migration destination state with 55,419 movers from New York to Florida. Intervals/colors could be changed to any configuration. The label shows total New York state out migration for that state. Expanded view shows detail more clearly. See this related view that shows a zoom-in to east coast area. Use the GIS project (see details) to create similar views for any state; visual analysis of outmigration for any state showing outmigration by destination state. Label areas as desired. Add other layers. Add your own data.

More About These Data
The American Community Survey (ACS) asks respondents age 1 year and over whether they lived in the same residence 1 year ago. For people who lived in a different residence, the location of their previous residence is collected. The state-to-state migration flows are created from tabulations of the current state (including the District of Columbia) of residence crossed by state of residence 1 year ago. An important reason to use the ACS data to examine migration patterns is because related attributes of the population can also be studied. By using the ACS Public Use Microdata Samples (a sample of individual respondent records), we can also examine patterns of state to state movers who are of a specific race/origin, age group, educational attainment, employment status and many other attributes. In addition, since the ACS data are collected/tabulated annually, these data also provide a means to examine migration trends.

Using the Interactive Table
Use the interactive table to view, rank, query and compare states based on origin and destination of movers. The following graphic illustrates use of the interactive table to rank California movers (rightmost column) descending order by migration destination state. The blue highlighted cell shows that there were 66,318 movers from California to Texas during 2013. It is easy to see the top destination states for any state by clicking the header cell for a state of interest and sorting in descending order.

Click graphic for larger view.

Support Using these Resources
Learn more about demographic economic data and related analytical tools. Join us in a Decision-Making Information Web session. There is no fee for these one-hour Web sessions. Each informal session is focused on a specific topic. The open structure also provides for Q&A and discussion of application issues of interest to participants.

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